£16 post free World-wide

 


555 sonatas 9Cds mp3 files
Only £22


 


Benjamin: Written on Skin £16

Search
What's New
Previous CDs
Concerts
Jazz
Nostalgia
Composers
Resources
Announce
Labels index


Every day we post 10 new Classical CD and DVD reviews. A free weekly summary is available by e-mail. MusicWeb is not a subscription site. To keep it free please purchase discs through our links.

  Classical Editor Rob Barnett    



Some items
to consider


Shostakovich 14 Petrenko


Rachmaninov #3
Prokofiev #2

 


Dunedin Consort

Peter Grimes

Hymn of Jesus: Sea Drift

Complete Mozart Edition
Mozart complete edition

Vaughan Williams Symphonies 5 & 8 £11

Weiner, Klepper, Bloch, Schulhoff £12 post free


Available again


 REVIEW


Gerard Hoffnung CDs

Advertising on
Musicweb


Donate and get a free CD

New Releases

Naxos Classical

Hyperion

Musicweb sells the following labels
Acte Préalable
Alto
Arcodiva
CDAccord
Centaur
Hallé
Hortus
Lyrita
Nimbus
Northern Flowers
Redcliffe
Sheva
Talent
Toccata Classics


Follow us on Twitter

Subscribe to our free weekly newsletter
 

alternatively
CD: AmazonUK AmazonUS


Franz LEHÁR (1870-1948)
Friederike - Operetta in three Acts (1928) [106:14]
Friederike - Kristiane Kaiser (soprano)
Salomea - Sylvia Schwartz (soprano)
Goethe - Klaus Florian Vogt (tenor)
Lenz - Daniel Behle (tenor)
Chor des Bayerischen Rundfunks
Münchner Rundfunkorchester/Ulf Schirmer
rec. live, Prinzregententheater, München, 9 March 2008
CPO 777 330-2 [47:04 + 59:10]
Experience Classicsonline


Franz Lehár’s Friederike was a relatively late composition. The huge success of The Merry Widow occurred back in 1905. Between the Widow and Friederike came other successes like: Der Graf von Luxemburg (1909), Zigeunerliebe (1910), Frasquita (1922), Paganini (1925) and Der Zarewitsch (1927). Lehár, despite hostility loved Friederike and regarded it as more opera than operetta - a realisation that would fully flower in his last great production, Giuditta (1934) after another great success Das Land des Lächelns (1929)

Friederike was considered to be very daring. Its concept was the early life and ill-fated love of Germany’s beloved Johann Wolfgang Goethe. Just imagine an English composer being rash enough to consider creating an operetta around the life of William Shakespeare! The critics loathed it. The public adored it. Friederike with its more than 300 performances, was Berlin’s most successful work during the 1928/29 season. Yet, later, Hitler’s Third Reich would subsequently crush it as subversive to patriotic German sensibilities.

Richard Traubner writing in his book, “Operetta, A Theatrical History”, remarked, “Friederike is one of the most passionate Léhar works, allowing Tauber a field-day.” Richard Tauber played Goethe for the then exorbitant evening fee of 2,000 marks. He had to repeat the operetta’s hit song ‘O Mächen, mein mädchen…’, alone, a total of five times at the premiere. In fact at the Berlin Six-Day cycle race in 1928 the crowd of 6,000 spectators frenetically demanded that he sing that song. ‘O mädchen, mein mädchen, wie lieb’ ich dich’ (‘O maiden … how I love you’) appears again and again, either subtly or overtly throughout the work as its basic motif; it is not sung until Act II.

Friederike, tells the rather improbable story of how the young Goethe had been kissed by a French girl who then cursed the girl who would kiss him after her. Consequently Goethe had been wary of allowing any other maiden within kissing distance of him - even Friederike the object of his love. Friederike, unafraid of the curse, kisses him and seals her doom because her lover is soon summoned to the court of Duke Karl August of Weimar who does not welcome attached creative artists. Friederike, anxious not to stand in the way of Goethe’s career sacrifices her love for him.

Lehár’s music scintillates as ever. Much of the music is true to 18th century styles - the dainty and elegant Minuet that opens Act II - but it is also tinged with more modern, often ironic little orchestral colourations to comment on character, atmosphere and action. Ulf Schirmer directs the ensemble in a sunny and animated performance. Klaus Florian Vogt is hardly a new Tauber but he does make a good fist of Goethe. Both sopranos shine as the two sisters, Friederike and Salomea. Theirs are ingénue and soubrette roles that depart from the usual stock stereotypes. There are many highlights as well as that song. These include Goethe’s dreamily romantic Act I arias ‘O, wie schön, wie wunderschön’ (O how lovely, how wondrously lovely’) and ‘Sah ein Knab’ ein Röslein stehn …’ in which he confesses his love for Friederike, the magical Act II duet for Friederike and Goethe ‘All mein Fühlen, all mein Sehen …’; and the glittering tune-filled finale to Act I.

CPO are gradually working through and recording the Lehár operettas (see below). As before, one has to be familiar with the German language to enjoy these recordings to the full, especially the many German dialogue tracks so important to fully grasp the subtleties of the plot developments. Is it not possible for CPO to follow the lead of so many other recording companies, these days, and include access, via the Internet, to the libretto (preferably in three or more languages including English)?

Another Lehár hit from CPO.

Ian Lace

Reviews of other Lehár operattas on CPO
7770552 Schön is die Welt
7771482 Eva
7773032 Das land des Lachelns
7773312 Bleue Mazur
9993262 Wiener Frauen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


EXPLORE MUSICWEB INTERNATIONAL

Making a Donation to MusicWeb

Writing CD reviews for MWI

About MWI
Who we are, where we have come from and how we do it.

Site Map

How to find a review

How to find articles on MusicWeb
Listed in date order

Review Indexes
   By Label
      Select a label and all reviews are listed in Catalogue order
   By Masterwork
            Links from composer names (eg Sibelius) are to resource pages with links to the review indexes for the individual works as well as other resources.

Themed Review pages

Jazz reviews

 

Discographies
   Composer
      Composer surveys
   National
      Unique to MusicWeb -
a comprehensive listing of all LP and CD recordings of given works
.
Prepared by Michael Herman

The Collector’s Guide to Gramophone Company Record Labels 1898 - 1925
Howard Friedman

Book Reviews

Complete Books
We have a number of out of print complete books on-line

Interviews
With Composers, Conductors, Singers, Instumentalists and others
Includes those on the Seen and Heard site

Nostalgia

Nostalgia CD reviews

Records Of The Year
Each reviewer is given the opportunity to select the best of the releases

Monthly Best Buys
Recordings of the Month and Bargains of the Month

Comment
Arthur Butterworth Writes

An occasional column

Phil Scowcroft's Garlands
British Light Music articles

Classical blogs
A listing of Classical Music Blogs external to MusicWeb International

Reviewers Logs
What they have been listening to for pleasure

Announcements

 

Community
Bulletin Board

Give your opinions or seek answers

Reviewers
Pat and present

Helpers invited!

Resources
How Did I Miss That?

Currently suspended but there are a lot there with sound clips


Composer Resources

British Composers

British Light Music Composers

Other composers

Film Music (Archive)
Film Music on the Web (Closed in December 2006)

Programme Notes
For concert organizers

External sites
British Music Society
The BBC Proms
Orchestra Sites
Recording Companies & Retailers
Online Music
Agents & Marketing
Publishers
Other links
Newsgroups
Web News sites etc

PotPourri
A pot-pourri of articles

MW Listening Room
MW Office

Advice to Windows Vista users  
Questionnaire    
Site History  
What they say about us
What we say about us!
Where to get help on the Internet
CD orders By Special Request
Graphics archive
Currency Converter
Dictionary
Magazines
Newsfeed  
Web Ring
Translation Service

Rules for potential reviewers :-)
Do Not Go Here!
April Fools




Return to Review Index

Untitled Document


Reviews from previous months
Join the mailing list and receive a hyperlinked weekly update on the discs reviewed. details
We welcome feedback on our reviews. Please use the Bulletin Board
Please paste in the first line of your comments the URL of the review to which you refer.