Aureole etc.




Golden Age singers

Nimbus on-line




Faure songs
Charlotte de Rothschild (soprano);

  Founder: Len Mullenger
Classical Editor: Rob Barnett


Some items
to consider


New App by the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra for iOS and Android!

Schumann Symphonies Rattle


Complete Brahms
Bargain price

 

REVIEW



Gerard Hoffnung CDs

Advertising on
Musicweb


Donate and get a free CD

New Releases

Naxos Classical

Hyperion

Musicweb sells the following labels
Acte Préalable
Alto
Arcodiva
Atoll
CDAccord
Cameo Classics
Centaur
Hallé
Hortus
Lyrita
Nimbus
Northern Flowers
Redcliffe
Sheva
Talent
Toccata Classics


Follow us on Twitter

Subscribe to our free weekly review listing
sample
 

Availability
CD & Download: Pristine Audio

Dohnányi in London
Wolfgang Amadeus MOZART (1756-1791)
Piano Concerto No.17 in G major K453 (1784) [28:41] ¹
Franz LISZT (1811-1886)
Hungarian Rhapsody No.1 [10:38]
Hector BERLIOZ (1803-1869)
Hungarian March from The Damnation of Faust; two versions (1846) [4:05 + 4:01]
Béni EGRESSY (1814-1851)
Szózat (Summons) [1:53]
Ernst von DOHNÁNYI (1877-1960)
Hiszekegy (I Believe) [2:45]
Ruralia Hungarica Op.32b No.5 (1924) [2:10] and No.2 [3:46] ²
Variations on a Nursery Tune Op.25 (1914) [21:38] ²*
Budapest Philharmonic Orchestra/Ernst von Dohnányi (and piano¹)
London Symphony Orchestra/Ernst von Dohnányi ²/*Lawrance Collingwood
rec. 1928-31, London
PRISTINE AUDIO PASC 252 [79:37]

Experience Classicsonline




This disc usefully gathers together all the recordings made by Ernst von Dohnányi (1877-1960) during two visits to London in 1928 and 1931. He paid the first of these visits with the Budapest Philharmonic Orchestra, of which he was music director from 1919 until the orchestra was disbanded in 1941. The recordings appear here in new transfers by Mark Obert-Thorn.
 
The recording that I was most keen to hear is of the piece that is Dohnányi’s best-known, the Variations on a Nursery Tune in which the composer plays the solo piano part. He recorded the work again - also in London - in 1956 for EMI when he was partnered by the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and Sir Adrian Boult. By a nice piece of serendipity the producer of that 1956 recording was Lawrance Collingwood, who wielded the baton - very effectively - for Dohnányi’s 1931 LSO recording, preserved here. The recording, made in the Kingsway Hall, is not the greatest in terms of sonics; the sound is, inevitably, a bit shrill and boxy. However, once my ears had adjusted - which didn’t take too long - I enjoyed the performance very much. It’s full of good humour and no little brilliance. The composer is a good soloist and the contribution of the LSO is equally good. The waltz, Variation VII, has a good swing to it and the Presto, Variation IX, sounds akin to The Sorcerer’s Apprentice. The concluding fugato fairly skips along. Mark Obert-Thorn has done a fine job of restoration and we hear far more detail than we have a right to expect from a recording that’s now over eight decades old.
 
Directing his Budapest orchestra from the keyboard in 1928, Dohnányi gives a good account of K.453. The Budapest band isn’t in the same class as the LSO - the rather stodgy introduction to the slow movement confirms that - but they support Dohnányi loyally. As soloist, Dohnányi is graceful in the first movement. He performs his own cadenza (9:01 - 10:43), which I enjoyed. His cadenza in the slow movement (7:45 - 9:07) is a thoughtful re-examination of that movement’s material. The finale, one of Mozart’s most engaging rondos, finds the orchestra on more deft form and Dohnányi offers spirited playing, especially in the concluding presto.

The remaining contents of the disc aren’t as noteworthy. However, there’s an interesting opportunity to compare two recordings of the Berlioz Hungarian March. The first recording was made on 16 June 1928 in an unknown but clearly acoustically confined location. That recording was for Columbia. Just two days later Dohnányi and the Budapest Philharmonic decamped to the Queen’s Hall to record the same piece and other material but this time for HMV. As Mark Obert-Thorn points out, the first recording is pretty constricted and, frankly, it’s not a very pleasant listening experience. The Queen’s Hall recording is much better and offers a more flattering - or, perhaps, fairer - representation of what the orchestra could do. It’s also interesting to compare the two excerpts from Ruralia Hungarica. Both as a performance and a recording the piece set down in 1931 with the LSO (Op.32b, No 2) is superior to the 1928 traversal of Op.32b No 5 with the Budapest Orchestra.
 
Ernst von Dohnányi was a considerable, all-round musician and these recordings are welcome as they give us a good representation of him as composer, conductor and pianist. Mark Obert-Thorn has done a fine job in giving a new lease of life to these recordings some eighty years after they were made.

John Quinn  

See also review by Jonathan Woolf  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


EXPLORE MUSICWEB INTERNATIONAL

Making a Donation to MusicWeb

Writing CD reviews for MWI

About MWI
Who we are, where we have come from and how we do it.

Site Map

How to find a review

How to find articles on MusicWeb
Listed in date order

Review Indexes
   By Label
      Select a label and all reviews are listed in Catalogue order
   By Masterwork
            Links from composer names (eg Sibelius) are to resource pages with links to the review indexes for the individual works as well as other resources.

Themed Review pages

Jazz reviews

 

Discographies
   Composer
      Composer surveys
   National
      Unique to MusicWeb -
a comprehensive listing of all LP and CD recordings of given works
.
Prepared by Michael Herman

The Collector’s Guide to Gramophone Company Record Labels 1898 - 1925
Howard Friedman

Book Reviews

Complete Books
We have a number of out of print complete books on-line

Interviews
With Composers, Conductors, Singers, Instumentalists and others
Includes those on the Seen and Heard site

Nostalgia

Nostalgia CD reviews

Records Of The Year
Each reviewer is given the opportunity to select the best of the releases

Monthly Best Buys
Recordings of the Month and Bargains of the Month

Comment
Arthur Butterworth Writes

An occasional column

Phil Scowcroft's Garlands
British Light Music articles

Classical blogs
A listing of Classical Music Blogs external to MusicWeb International

Reviewers Logs
What they have been listening to for pleasure

Announcements

 

Community
Bulletin Board

Give your opinions or seek answers

Reviewers
Pat and present

Helpers invited!

Resources
How Did I Miss That?

Currently suspended but there are a lot there with sound clips


Composer Resources

British Composers

British Light Music Composers

Other composers

Film Music (Archive)
Film Music on the Web (Closed in December 2006)

Programme Notes
For concert organizers

External sites
British Music Society
The BBC Proms
Orchestra Sites
Recording Companies & Retailers
Online Music
Agents & Marketing
Publishers
Other links
Newsgroups
Web News sites etc

PotPourri
A pot-pourri of articles

MW Listening Room
MW Office

Advice to Windows Vista users  
Questionnaire    
Site History  
What they say about us
What we say about us!
Where to get help on the Internet
CD orders By Special Request
Graphics archive
Currency Converter
Dictionary
Magazines
Newsfeed  
Web Ring
Translation Service

Rules for potential reviewers :-)
Do Not Go Here!
April Fools






Untitled Document


Reviews from previous months
Join the mailing list and receive a hyperlinked weekly update on the discs reviewed. details
We welcome feedback on our reviews. Please use the Bulletin Board
Please paste in the first line of your comments the URL of the review to which you refer.