Aureole etc.




Nimbus on-line




If it’s the Czech works you’re after, do not hesitate

  Founder: Len Mullenger
Classical Editor: Rob Barnett


Some items
to consider

 


Enjoy the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra wherever you are. App available for iOS and Android


Tudor 7188


Vaughan Williams Symphony 3 etc.


Lyrita New Recording


Lyrita Premiere Recordings

Lyrita 4CDs £16 incl.postage

Lyrita 4CDs £16 incl.postage


Decca Phase 4 - 40CDs


Judith Bailey, George Lloyd


BAX Orchestral pieces


CASKEN Violin Concerto

Schumann Symphonies Rattle


Complete Brahms
Bargain price

 

 

 

 

REVIEW



Gerard Hoffnung CDs

Advertising on
Musicweb


Donate and get a free CD

New Releases

Naxos Classical

Hyperion

Musicweb sells the following labels
Acte Préalable
Alto
Arcodiva
Atoll
CDAccord
Cameo Classics
Centaur
Hallé
Hortus
Lyrita
Nimbus
Northern Flowers
Redcliffe
Sheva
Talent
Toccata Classics


Follow us on Twitter

Subscribe to our free weekly review listing
sample
 

Purchase from
Fuga

Ylistaron kirkon urut (The organ of Ylistaro Church)
Kalevi KIVINIEMI (b. 1958)
Ylistaro-fantasia [4:22]
Oskar LINDBERG (1887-1955)
Vanha virsi Taalainmaalta [5:51]
Bengt GRANSTAM (b. 1932)
Vanha virsi Leksandista [3:21]
Hugo ALFVÉN (1872-1960)
Elegi, Op. 49 (arr. Oskar Lindberg) [4:46]
William B. BRADBURY (1816-1868)
Saviour, like a Shepherd lead us (arr. James Pethel) [2:00]
Alexander EWING (1830-1895)
Jerusalem, the Golden (arr. James Pethel) [3:11]
Felice de GIARDINI (1716-1796)
Come, Thou almighty King (arr. James Pethel) [3:13]
Alexandre GUILMANT (1837-1911)
Lamento, Op. 90/4 [2:23]
Kalevi KIVINIEMI
Urkukoraal ‘Ystävä sä lapsien’ [2:20]
Johann Sebastian BACH (1685-1750)
Päätöskuoro Matteuspassiosta [3:17]
Marcel DUPRÉ (1886-1971)
79 Chorales, Op. 28 (excerpts)
Kalevi KIVINIEMI
Ylistaro-runoelma [4:57]
Kalevi Kiviniemi (organ)
rec. 2002; reworked for SACD release June 2012. Stereo/multichannel 5.0
FUGA-9340/MKSACD-60 [55:08]
 

Experience Classicsonline

 
Regular readers will know how much I admire Fuga’s organ recordings. At the heart of this ongoing enterprise are the organist Kalevi Kiviniemi and his producer/engineer Mika Koivusalo, whose Lakeuden Risti SACD was my top pick for 2009 (review). Quite simply, this and their other discs are among the most natural and immersive organ recordings I know. That wouldn’t count for much without Kiviniemi, whose unerring musical instincts are seldom in doubt, whether it’s a Dupré showpiece played on a great, roaring Cavaillé-Coll or a Nordic hymn tune picked out on a well-behaved local instrument.
 
Indeed, hearing the remarkable range and quality of Finnish organs has been one of the abiding pleasures of this series. The fairly modern Kangasala in Ylistaro Church, south Ostrobothnia, is no exception. Inaugurated at the church’s 100th anniversary in 1952, it was the focus of Kiviniemi and Koivusalo’s 2002 recording which, in turn, was ‘reworked’ for release as an SACD in 2012. I wasn’t aware of this until after I’d played the disc for the first time, and such is the technical wizardry employed here that I’m sure most listeners would also assume this was an up-to-the-minute Super Audio original.
 
That’s only the first surprise; the second is the music itself. Chosen for its devotional character – it was the church’s sesquicentennial after all – this unusual programme contains much that is new to me. Kiviniemi sets the scene with his lovely little fantasia on a Ylistaro chorale melody. The warm, forgiving tones of this organ are most beautifully rendered, and the discreet ‘walking bass’ is pure delight. There’s a pleasing blend of clarity and spaciousness too, and no disfiguring echo.
 
The Lindberg and Granstam pieces, based on Swedish chorale tunes from Dalecarlia and Leksand respectively, are blessed with a simple gravitas that’s intensely moving. The rich, dark hues of the Lindberg – and its glowing cadences – are especially memorable; and while the religious character of this music is unmistakable, Kiviniemi imbues it with a quiet splendour that’s impossible to resist. Similarly, the Granstam piece has an understated majesty, the all-embracing swirl of sound as close to ‘being there’ as it’s possible to get.
 
Lindberg’s arrangement of the Alfvén Elegy brings out the open-hearted loveliness of this fine instrument, whose honeyed tones rarely seem too fulsome or too sweet. Kiviniemi is as judicious as ever, his registrations and self-effacing style ideal for this repertoire. As a recording one is constantly aware of serried ranks of sound rather than a towering wall of it, and that adds greatly to one’s enjoyment of this disc. Even the rather more extrovert Bradbury hymn emerges with an amplitude that, while impressive, is always carefully scaled and cleanly articulated. As for Alexander Ewing’s Jerusalem the Golden, it’s a tantalising vision built from the most radiant sounds imaginable; indeed, that long, sustained finale evokes a marvellous sense of certainty and strength.
 
Much of the material on this disc lasts for just a few minutes, which could so easily result in a ‘bitty’ recital. That it doesn’t is a mark of good programming, the luminous Giardini a pleasing contrast to what’s gone before. True, it’s not all memorable music, but that matters less when it’s recorded with such an powerful sense of presence. The deep bass – so essential to the organ experience – has an almost bodily resonance that’s very rare in a recording. No qualms about the quality of the Guilmant Lamento, whose rocking motif and Stygian pedals have seldom sounded so plangent.
 
As for Kiviniemi’s chorale prelude, based on a Swedish chorale melody, it’s dwarfed by the somewhat glutinous arrangement of the closing chorus from Bach’s St Matthew Passion. The latter is the one piece I’d happily forgo, which certainly isn’t the case with the nine chorale preludes from Marcel Dupré’s 79 Chorales (1931). They’re not played in chronological order, which may seem strange, but if that makes for more contrast and variety then it’s hardly an issue. In any case, this is organ music of the highest quality, the mellow Kangasala well-suited to this selection. Indeed, ‘In dulci jubilo’ (No. 41) sounds unusually playful here.
 
I did say there were no showpieces, but No. 74 is suitably stirring. It’s the perfect foil for the haunting No. 1, in which the organ sounds deliciously ‘woody’. As for No. 29, Kiviniemi keeps it light and supple, before making a most joyful noise in No. 19. The disc ends, parenthetically as it were, with Kiviniemi’s ‘outro’ based on another Ylistaro chorale melody. The organ’s sparkling upper reaches and its tight, rolling bass are shown to best advantage here.
 
This recital achieves three things; it celebrates spiritual continuity, it showcases this organ, and it marks something of a pilgrimage for Koivusalo, who has strong and enduring ties with Ylistaro. As with the Espoo recording – review – there’s a rare sense of connection with a church and its community. In that sense this low-key programme seems utterly right, even if its appeal may be somewhat limited. That said, anyone looking for something more flamboyant and/or familiar need only turn to the other superb discs in the Fuga catalogue.
 
A very unusual issue, thoughtfully played and beautifully recorded.
 
Dan Morgan
http://twitter.com/mahlerei
 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 


EXPLORE MUSICWEB INTERNATIONAL

Making a Donation to MusicWeb

Writing CD reviews for MWI

About MWI
Who we are, where we have come from and how we do it.

Site Map

How to find a review

How to find articles on MusicWeb
Listed in date order

Review Indexes
   By Label
      Select a label and all reviews are listed in Catalogue order
   By Masterwork
            Links from composer names (eg Sibelius) are to resource pages with links to the review indexes for the individual works as well as other resources.

Themed Review pages

Jazz reviews

 

Discographies
   Composer
      Composer surveys
   National
      Unique to MusicWeb -
a comprehensive listing of all LP and CD recordings of given works
.
Prepared by Michael Herman

The Collector’s Guide to Gramophone Company Record Labels 1898 - 1925
Howard Friedman

Book Reviews

Complete Books
We have a number of out of print complete books on-line

Interviews
With Composers, Conductors, Singers, Instumentalists and others
Includes those on the Seen and Heard site

Nostalgia

Nostalgia CD reviews

Records Of The Year
Each reviewer is given the opportunity to select the best of the releases

Monthly Best Buys
Recordings of the Month and Bargains of the Month

Comment
Arthur Butterworth Writes

An occasional column

Phil Scowcroft's Garlands
British Light Music articles

Classical blogs
A listing of Classical Music Blogs external to MusicWeb International

Reviewers Logs
What they have been listening to for pleasure

Announcements

 

Community
Bulletin Board

Give your opinions or seek answers

Reviewers
Pat and present

Helpers invited!

Resources
How Did I Miss That?

Currently suspended but there are a lot there with sound clips


Composer Resources

British Composers

British Light Music Composers

Other composers

Film Music (Archive)
Film Music on the Web (Closed in December 2006)

Programme Notes
For concert organizers

External sites
British Music Society
The BBC Proms
Orchestra Sites
Recording Companies & Retailers
Online Music
Agents & Marketing
Publishers
Other links
Newsgroups
Web News sites etc

PotPourri
A pot-pourri of articles

MW Listening Room
MW Office

Advice to Windows Vista users  
Questionnaire    
Site History  
What they say about us
What we say about us!
Where to get help on the Internet
CD orders By Special Request
Graphics archive
Currency Converter
Dictionary
Magazines
Newsfeed  
Web Ring
Translation Service

Rules for potential reviewers :-)
Do Not Go Here!
April Fools






Untitled Document


Reviews from previous months
Join the mailing list and receive a hyperlinked weekly update on the discs reviewed. details
We welcome feedback on our reviews. Please use the Bulletin Board
Please paste in the first line of your comments the URL of the review to which you refer.