£16 post free World-wide

 


555 sonatas 9Cds mp3 files
Only £22


 


Benjamin: Written on Skin £16

Search
What's New
Previous CDs
Concerts
Jazz
Nostalgia
Composers
Resources
Announce
Labels index


Every day we post 10 new Classical CD and DVD reviews. A free weekly summary is available by e-mail. MusicWeb is not a subscription site. To keep it free please purchase discs through our links.

  Classical Editor Rob Barnett    



Some items
to consider


Shostakovich 14 Petrenko


Rachmaninov #3
Prokofiev #2

 


Dunedin Consort

Peter Grimes

Hymn of Jesus: Sea Drift

Complete Mozart Edition
Mozart complete edition

Vaughan Williams Symphonies 5 & 8 £11

Weiner, Klepper, Bloch, Schulhoff £12 post free


Available again

REVIEW



Gerard Hoffnung CDs

Advertising on
Musicweb


Donate and get a free CD

New Releases

Naxos Classical

Hyperion

Musicweb sells the following labels
Acte Préalable
Alto
Arcodiva
CDAccord
Centaur
Hallé
Hortus
Lyrita
Nimbus
Northern Flowers
Redcliffe
Sheva
Talent
Toccata Classics


Follow us on Twitter

Subscribe to our free weekly newsletter
 

alternatively
CD: MDT AmazonUK AmazonUS

Robert SCHUMANN (1810-1856)
Piano Trio No. 1 in D minor, Op. 63 (1847) [30:42]
Piano Trio No. 3 in G major, Op. 110 (1851) [27:53]
Voces Intimae (Riccardo Cecchetti (fortepiano); Luigi de Filippi (violin); Sandro Meo (cello))
rec. 19-22 May 2011, FWL Studios, Leipzig, Germany.
CHALLENGE CLASSICS CC72520 [58:40]

Experience Classicsonline

Played on period instruments, Voces Intimae has recorded Schumann’s first and third Piano Trios. They use a violin by A. Mariani (1648), a copy of a C. Bergonzi cello from the late 1700 and a J.B. Streicher fortepiano (1847).
 
Another disc would have accommodated the Piano Trio No. 2 in F major, Op. 80 and the Fantasiestücke for piano, violin and cello, Op.88. There is also Theodor Kirchner’s arrangement for piano trio of the 6 Études in Canonic Form, Op. 56. Schumann’s works for Piano Trio were greatly inspired by the chamber music of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Mendelssohn and Schubert; all of whom he passionately revered.
 
The four movement Piano Trio No. 1 was a present for his wife Clara’s twenty-eighth birthday. Of the three Piano Trios this is the longest, most symphonic and most reflective in character, regarded by many as the greatest of the three. Clara recorded in her diary that, “The first movement is one of the most beautiful that I know.” The lengthy opening movement feels symphonic in texture, breezy, ebbing and flowing in intensity. In the hands of Voces Intimae the music feels attractive rather than having the beauty that Clara heard. The Scherzo gallops carefully along leaving me wanting additional forward momentum. Its relatively calm central section soon gives way to the return of the surging writing. Like an extended lament the third movement felt sorrowful, rather than exuding the deeply aching melancholy that the finest versions convey. The Finale here conveys a sense of regaining strength and energy. I was left feeling that an input of extra boldness and vigour was required.
 
Following the Piano Trios in D minor, Op. 63 and F major, Op. 80 it was four years before Schumann in 1851 wrote his four movement Piano Trio No. 3. Amiable and high-spirited this G major score made quite an impression on Clara who commented, “It is unique, full of passion, through and through …” In the highly passionate opening movement with its sweeping lines the finest versions communicate a convincing sense of torment. With Voces Intimae I felt merely apprehension and loneliness. The refined and sensitive second movement has a stormy central section that rudely interrupts the mood before the gentle dance returns. Curiously paced and agitated the Scherzo would have felt more convincing with extra energy. The Finale is played with a moderate degree of spirit but I wanted it to overflow with joy and highlight the uplifting bursts of energy. Schumann however ensures that a sense of restlessness is never far way.
 
I wanted Voces Intimae to provide a wider dynamic range and broader contrasts of tempi to accord with the firebrand Schumann’s passionate Romanticism. Sadly there was insufficient intensity, deeply felt passion and spontaneity to their playing to emphasise the extremes of emotion that the finest interpreters like the Beaux Art Trio communicate. Recorded in the FWL Studios, Leipzig the sound quality was slightly congested with the instruments not as vividly clear as I wanted. The balance left the recessed cello sounding rather muffled. I usually love the sound of music played on period instruments but the recording failed to allow the instruments appealing sonority or purity of intonation. The fortepiano by J.B. Streicher (1847) is somewhat woody and ‘clompy’ making it generally uncomfortable on the ear.
 
I can highly recommend the wonderful set of Schumann’s Piano Trios from the masterful Beaux Arts Trio. Recorded in 1971 at La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland the polished trio play with remarkable expression, liveliness and refinement. As one would expect from a 1971 recording the Beaux Arts play on instruments with modern stringing. Now over forty years old these evergreen accounts belie their age with the recordings sounding extremely impressive on Philips 456 323-2 (c/w Schumann Piano Quintet, Op. 44, Piano Quartet, Op. 7). Also worthy of praise is the Florestan Trio who play the three Schumann Piano Trios beautifully throughout and with considerable expression. They use modern instruments. The Florestan was recorded in 1998 at St. George’s, Brandon Hill, Bristol and in 1999 at the Henry Wood Hall, London. These are on two separate discs: Piano Trios No. 1 and No. 2 recorded in 1998 on Hyperion CDA67063 and Piano Trio No. 3 on CDA67175 (c/w Schumann Piano Quartet, Fantasiestücke). More recently I have enjoyed the set of Schumann’s Complete Works for Piano Trio played on instruments with modern stringing on EMI Classics 0 94180 2. Recorded in 2009/10 at Østre Fredrikstad Kirke, Fredrikstad, Norway the trio are pianist Leif Ove Andsnes, violinist Christian Tetzlaff and cellist Tanja Tetzlaff. These players evince natural musicianship in stirring and highly satisfying performances. After four decades the Beaux Arts Trio remains supreme in this repertoire.
 
Michael Cookson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


EXPLORE MUSICWEB INTERNATIONAL

Making a Donation to MusicWeb

Writing CD reviews for MWI

About MWI
Who we are, where we have come from and how we do it.

Site Map

How to find a review

How to find articles on MusicWeb
Listed in date order

Review Indexes
   By Label
      Select a label and all reviews are listed in Catalogue order
   By Masterwork
            Links from composer names (eg Sibelius) are to resource pages with links to the review indexes for the individual works as well as other resources.

Themed Review pages

Jazz reviews

 

Discographies
   Composer
      Composer surveys
   National
      Unique to MusicWeb -
a comprehensive listing of all LP and CD recordings of given works
.
Prepared by Michael Herman

The Collector’s Guide to Gramophone Company Record Labels 1898 - 1925
Howard Friedman

Book Reviews

Complete Books
We have a number of out of print complete books on-line

Interviews
With Composers, Conductors, Singers, Instumentalists and others
Includes those on the Seen and Heard site

Nostalgia

Nostalgia CD reviews

Records Of The Year
Each reviewer is given the opportunity to select the best of the releases

Monthly Best Buys
Recordings of the Month and Bargains of the Month

Comment
Arthur Butterworth Writes

An occasional column

Phil Scowcroft's Garlands
British Light Music articles

Classical blogs
A listing of Classical Music Blogs external to MusicWeb International

Reviewers Logs
What they have been listening to for pleasure

Announcements

 

Community
Bulletin Board

Give your opinions or seek answers

Reviewers
Pat and present

Helpers invited!

Resources
How Did I Miss That?

Currently suspended but there are a lot there with sound clips


Composer Resources

British Composers

British Light Music Composers

Other composers

Film Music (Archive)
Film Music on the Web (Closed in December 2006)

Programme Notes
For concert organizers

External sites
British Music Society
The BBC Proms
Orchestra Sites
Recording Companies & Retailers
Online Music
Agents & Marketing
Publishers
Other links
Newsgroups
Web News sites etc

PotPourri
A pot-pourri of articles

MW Listening Room
MW Office

Advice to Windows Vista users  
Questionnaire    
Site History  
What they say about us
What we say about us!
Where to get help on the Internet
CD orders By Special Request
Graphics archive
Currency Converter
Dictionary
Magazines
Newsfeed  
Web Ring
Translation Service

Rules for potential reviewers :-)
Do Not Go Here!
April Fools






Untitled Document


Reviews from previous months
Join the mailing list and receive a hyperlinked weekly update on the discs reviewed. details
We welcome feedback on our reviews. Please use the Bulletin Board
Please paste in the first line of your comments the URL of the review to which you refer.