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EAST-CENTRAL EUROPEAN & BALKAN SYMPHONIES
From the 19th Century To the Present

A Discography Of CDs And LPs
Prepared by Michael Herman

Page 2

All national discographies

Page 1


OTMAR MACHA
(1922-2006, CZECH)

Born in Ostrava. As a child, he learned the violin from a village teacher then studied composition with Jaroslav Řídký at the Prague Conservatory. He worked as a music adviser at Czechoslovak Radio in Prague but then became a freelance composer. He composed operas and other stage works as well as orchestral, chamber and vocal music. He composed a Symphony for Large Orchestra (1947-8) and his ultimate orchestral work was his Symphonia Bohemorum (2002-3).

Sinfonietta No. 1 (1971)

Jaroslav Kromholc/Czechoslovak Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Ostrčil: Suite in C minor)
PANTON 8110 0066 (LP) (1979)


Sinfonietta No. 2 "Whether the New Things Emerge" (1979-80)

Václav Neumann/Czech Phlharmonic Orchestra
( + Matej: Violin Concerto)
PANTON 8110 0634 (LP) (1986)


Sinfonietta da Camera (1993)

Marek Stilec/Quattro Orchestra
( + Suk: Meditation on the Old Czech Chorale, Bodorová: Carmina Lucemburgiana, Mertzig: 3 Esquisses, Wengler: Novellette for Saxophone and Strings and Guillaume de Machaut - Messe de Nostre Dame-Selections)
ARCO DIVA UP 0113-2 (2010)

JAN MÁLEK
(b.1938, CZECH)

Born in Prague. At the Prague Conservatory, he studied composition with Miloslav Kabeláč who became his advisor on modern composition trends. He became a music and recording director for Czechoslovak Radio first in in Plzeň and then in Prague. He has composed orchestral, chamber, vocal and electronic works. His later Symphonies are: Nos. 2 (1987) and
3 "Sinfonia III, per B" (2002).

Symphony No. 1 "Sinfonia su una Cantilena" (1981)

Jaromil Nohejl/Moravian Philharmonic, Olomouc
( + Hurnik: Maryka)
PANTON 81100529 (LP) (1985)




JOZEF MALOVEC
(1933-1998, SLOVAK)

Born in Hurbanovo. After initial musical studiesin secondary school, he took private lessons in harmony, counterpoint and musical forms from Ján Zimmer and then studied composition with Alexander Moyzes at the Academy of Music and Drama in Bratislava. In addition, he studied at the Academy of Music and Drama in Prague with Jaroslav Ŕídký and Vladimír Sommer. He worked as programme adviser and editor of the Czechoslovak Radio in Bratislava. He composed in varios genres with an emphasis on chamber and vocal works. His Symphony No. 1 is from 1988.

Symphony No. 2 (1989)

Marian Vach/Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra, Bratislava
( + Chamber Symphony and Quasi una Sonata)
SLOVAK RADIO RECORDS RB 0078-2331 (2004)

Chamber Symphony (1980)

Ondrej Lenárd/Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra, Bratislava
( + Symphony No. 2 and Quasi una Sonata)
SLOVAK RADIO RECORDS RB 0078-2331 (2004)


CZESŁAW MAREK
(1891-1985, POLISH > SWITZERLAND)

Born in Przemyśl. He studied harmony at the Lemberg Music Institute with Stanisław Niewiadomski, piano and composition with Teodor Leschetizky and Karl Weigl in Vienna and further training in composition with Hans Pfitzner in Strasbourg. From 1915, he settled in Switzerland where he taught at the Berre-Conservatory of Music in Zürich and then headed the Conservatory in Poznan before returning permanently to Switzerland. He composed orchestral, chamber, choral music and vocal music. Some of his other works for orchestra are a Symphonic Scherzo, Serenade for Violin and Orchestra, Meditations and Suite.

Sinfonia, Op. 28 (1928)

Gary Brain/The Philharmonia London
( + Sinfonietta, Suite for Orchestra, Capriccio, Serenade for Violin and Orchestra and Meditations)
GUILD GMCD7360-61 (2 CDs) (2012)
(original CD release: KOCH INTERNATIONAL 3-6439-2) (1995)


Sinfonietta (1916)

Gary Brain/The Philharmonia London
( + Sinfonietta, Suite for Orchestra, Capriccio, Serenade for Violin and Orchestra and Meditations)
GUILD GMCD7360-61 (2 CDs) (2012)
(original CD release: KOCH INTERNATIONAL 3-6440-2) (1997)


IVAN MARINOV
(1928-2003, BULGARIAN)

Born in Sofia. He graduated from the State Academy of Music in Sofia where he studied composition with Vesselin Stoyanov and Parashkev Hadjiev and conducting under Marin Goleminov. After further training in Berlin, he was appointed to various posts including head of the Opera Theatres Department at the Bulgarian Ministry of Culture and Music Director of the Bulgarian Cinematography Enterprise . Later he worked as a chief conductor of the opera in Plovdiv (1962-66), Sofia and Ruse and eventually became chief conductor and artistic director of the Varna Philharmonic as well as chief conductor of the Sofia Opera. He composed orchestral, chamber and vocal works as well as many film scores. His orchestral output includes Symphony “A Boy Is Counting the Stars” (1962).

Symphony No. 1 for Bass and Orchestra (1967)

Ivan Marinov/Pavel Gerdzhikov (bass)/Sofia Opera House Orchestra
BALKANTON BCA 1158 (LP) (1970s)




ALBERT MÁRKOS
(1914-1981, ROMANIAN)

Born in Cristuru Secuiesc, Transylvania. He studied composition with Marţian Negrea as well as the violin and choral
conducting at the Cluj Conservatory. He was a professor at the George Dima Conservatory in Cluj-Napoca. He also wrote a Sinfonia Per
Prospera ad Libertatemin (1961).

Symphony Concertante for Wind Quintet and Chamber Orchestra (1964)

Mircea Cristescu/Cluj Napoca Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Demian: Oboe Concerto)
ELECTRECORD ST-ECE 1926 (LP) (1970s)




MIKLÓS MARÓS
(b.1943, HUNGARIAN > SWEDEN)

Born in Pécs, Hungary, the son of composer Rudolf Marós (1917-1982). He studied composition with Ferenc Szabo at the State Academy of Music in Budapest and Reszö Sugár at the Bela Bartók Conservatory. He came to Sweden in 1968 and studied composition with Ingvar Lidholm at the State Academy of Music in Stockholm also studying with György Ligeti who has had an important influence on his compositional technique. He has taught electronic music at Electronic Music Studio and at the Stockholm College of Music and founded the Marós Ensemble to promote the performance of contemporary music. He has composed operas, orchestral, chamber and vocal music. Thus far, he has written 4 numbered Symphonies of which Nos. 2 for Wind Band (1979) and 4 (1998) have not been recorded. Among his other orchestral works there is also a Sinfonietta for Chamber Orchestra (1985), a Concerto Grosso and several Concertos for solo instruments.

Symphony No. 1 (1974)

Miklós Marós/Budapest Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 3, Gitanjali Songs and Alto-Saxophone Concerto)
PHONO SUECIA PSCD 023 (1992)
(original LP release: PHONO SUECIA PS 23) (1984)


Symphony No. 3 for Strings "Sinfonia Concertante" (1986)

Juha Kangas/Ostrobothnian Chamber Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 1, Gitanjali Songs and Alto-Saxophone Concerto)
PHONO SUECIA PSCD 023 (1992)




RUDOLF MARÓS
(1917-1982, HUNGARIAN)

Born in Stachy. He studied composition with Zoltán Kodály and Albert Siklós at the Budapest Academy of Music and later had some studies with Alois Haba. He played viola in the Budapest Concert Orchestra and joined the faculty of the Budapest Academy of Music. He composed ballets, orchestral, chamber and vocal works. In his orchestral catalogue are 2 Sinfoniettas: Nos. 1 (1944) and 2 (1948). He is the father of composer Miklós Marós.

Symphony for Strings (1956)

Gyorgy Lehel/Hungarian Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Musica da Ballo)
HUNGAROTON LPX 1144 (LP) (1963)



BOHUSLAV MARTINŮ
(1890-1959, CZECH > USA)

Born in in Polička, Bohemia. He learned the violin as a child. He attended the Prague Conservatory where he studied theory and the organ but was expelled. He later reentered this school and studied briefly with Josef Suk but failed to graduate. He earned a living as a violinist in the Czech Philharmonic before going to Paris for private composition lessons with Albert Roussel. His reputation as a composer grew but the advent of World War II found him in America. His catalogue of compositions is enormous covering all genres from oplera and ballet to solo instrumental works. Practically all of his important works have been recorded.

Symphony No. 1 (1942)

Karel Ančerl/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1963)
( + Symphonies Nos. 3 and 5)
MULTISONIC 31 0023-2 (2 CDs) (1991)

Jiří Bělohlávek/BBC Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6)
ONYX ONYX4061 (3 CDs) (2011)

Jiří Bělohlávek/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Double Concerto for 2 String Orchestras)
CHANDOS CHAN 8950 (1992)

Arthur Fagen/Ukrainian National Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 6)
NAXOS 8.553348 (2000)

Claus Peter Flor/Berlin Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2)
RCA VICTOR RED SEAL 60154 (1990)

Neeme Järvi/Bamberg Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6)
BIS CD-1371-2 (2 CDs) (2003)
(original CD release: BIS CD-362 (1987)

Václav Neumann/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2)
SUPRAPHON 111966 (1995)
(original LP release: SUPRAPHON 1102166) (1977)

Bryden Thomson/Royal Scottish National Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6)
CHANDOS CHAN 10316 (3 CDs) (2005)
(original CD release: CHANDOS CHAN 8915 (1991)

Vladimír Válek/Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6)
SUPRAPHON SU 3940-2 (3 CDs) (2008)

Walter Weller/National Orchestra of Belgium
( + Violin Concerto No. 2)
FUGA LIBERA FUG 589 (2012)


Symphony No. 2 (1943)

Jiří Bělohlávek/BBC Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6)
ONYX ONYX4061 (3 CDs) (2011)

Arthur Fagen/Ukrainian National Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 4)
NAXOS 8.553349 (2001)

Claus Peter Flor/Berlin Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 1)
RCA VICTOR RED SEAL 60154 (1990)

Neeme Järvi/Bamberg Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6)
BIS CD-1371-2 (2 CDs) (2003)
(original CD release: BIS CD-362 (1987)

Paavo Järvi/Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra
( + Dvo·ák: Symphony No. 9)
TELARC CD-60616 (2005)

Václav Neumann/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 1)
SUPRAPHON 111966 (1995)
(original LP release: SUPRAPHON 1102096) (1978)

Gennady Rozhdestvensky/USSR Ministry of Culture Symphony Orchestra (rec. 1985)
( + Symphony No.3)
YEDANG CLASSICS YCC-0119 (2002)

Bryden Thomson/Royal Scottish National Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6)
CHANDOS CHAN 10316 (3 CDs) (2005)
(original CD release: CHANDOS CHAN 8916) (1991)

Vladimír Válek/Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6)
SUPRAPHON SU 3940-2 (3 CDs) (2008)


Symphony No. 3 (1944)

Karel Ančerl/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1966)
( + Symphonies Nos. 1 and 5)
MULTISONIC 31 0023-2 (2 CDs) (1991)
( + Bouquet of Flowers)
PRAGA PR 254 061 (1996)

Karel Ančerl/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1967)
( + Bouquet of Flowers)
PRAGA PR 254 061 (1996)

Bŕetislav Bakala/Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra
MUZA L 150 (LP) (1950s)

Jiří Bělohlávek/BBC Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 4, 5 and 6)
ONYX ONYX4061 (3 CDs) (2011)

Jiří Bělohlávek/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 4)
SUPRAPHON SU 3631-2 (2004)

Arthur Fagen/Ukrainian National Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 5)
NAXOS 8.553350 (2002)

Neeme Järvi/Bamberg Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 4, 5 and 6)
BIS CD-1371-2 (2 CDs) (2003)
(original CD release: BIS CD-363 (1987)

František Jilek/Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1980)
( + Concerto for String Quartet and Orchestra and Julietta: Suite)
PANTON 81 1301-2 (1994)
(original LP release: PANTON 81100205) (1981)

Václav Neumann/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 4)
SUPRAPHON 111967 (1995)
(original release: SUPRAPHON 14102771 {2 LPs}) (1979)

Gennady Rozhdestvensky/USSR Ministry of Culture Symphony Orchestra (rec. 1985)
( + Symphony No. 2)
YEDANG CLASSICS YCC-0119 (2002)

Karel Šejna/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1949)
( + Concerto for Piano, Percussion and Strings and Dvoŕák: American Suite)
SUPRAPHON SU 1924-2 (1996)
(from SUPRAPHON 78's)

Bryden Thomson/Royal Scottish National Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 4, 5 and 6)
CHANDOS CHAN 10316 (3 CDs) (2005)
(original CD release: CHANDOS CHAN 8917) (1991)


Symphony No. 4 (1945)

Ernest Ansermet/Orchestre de la Suisse Romande (rec. 1967)
( + Frescoes of Piero della Francesca and Parables)
CASCAVELLE VEL 2007 (2005)

Ernest Ansermet/Orchestre de la Suisse Romande (rec. 1976)
( + Dutilleux: Symphony No. 1)
CASCAVELLE VEL 3127 (2010)

Jiří Bělohlávek/BBC Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6)
ONYX ONYX4061 (3 CDs) (2011)

Jiří Bělohlávek/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Memorial to Lidice and Field Mass)
CHANDOS CHAN 9138 (1993)

Jiří Bělohlávek/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 3)
SUPRAPHON SU 3631-2 (2004)

Jiří Bělohlávek/Prague Symphony Orchestra (rec. 1979)
( + Symphony No. 5)
PANTON 8112052 (1991)
(original LP release: PANTON 81100023) (1980)

Arthur Fagen/Ukrainian National Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2)
NAXOS 8.553349 (2001)

Neeme Järvi/Bamberg Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6)
BIS CD-1371-2 (2 CDs) (2003)
(original CD release: BIS CD-363 (1987)

Rafael Kubelik/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1946)
( + Janáček: Sinfonietta, Dvoŕák: Slavonic Rhapsody No. 3, Berlioz: Damanation of Faust-Ballet of the Sylphs, Mendelssohn: A Midsummer Night's Dream-Overture, Hindemith: Symphonic Metamorphosis of Themes by Carl Maria von Weber, Schumann: Genoveva-Overture, Schubert: Symphony No. 3 and Mahler: Symphony No. 10-Adagio)
EMI GREAT CONDUCTORS OF THE 20TH CENTURY 5 62863-2 (2 CDs) (2004)
( + Memorial to Lidice, Dvořák: Symphony No. 8, Piano Concerto and Shostakovich: Symphony No. 9 )
SUPRAPHON SU 4080-2 (2012)

Václav Neumann/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 3)
SUPRAPHON 111967 (1995)
(original release: SUPRAPHON 14102771 {2 LPs}) (1979)

Klaus Tennstedt/Southwest German Radio Symphony Orchestra, Stuttgart (rec. 1973)
( + Brahms: Symphony No. 1)
ICA CLASSICS ICAC 5090 (2013)

Bryden Thomson/Royal Scottish National Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6)
CHANDOS CHAN 10316 (3 CDs) (2005)
(original CD release: CHANDOS CHAN 8917) (1991)

Martin Turnovský/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Piano Concerto No.4 and Tre Ricercari)
APEX 092749822-2 (2003)
(original LP release: SUPRAPHON SUA ST 50669/ERATO STU 70401) (1967)

Vladimír Válek/Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 4, 5 and 6)
SUPRAPHON SU 3940-2 (3 CDs) (2008)

Walter Weller/Belgian National Orchestra
( + Éstampes and Le Départ)
FUGA LIBERA FUG531 (2007)

Walter Weller/Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Memorial to Lidice, Sinfonietta La Jolla, Frescoes of Piero della Francesca for Orchestra, Double Concerto for 2 String Orchestras, Concerto for String Quartet and Orchestra and Sinfonia Concertante for Oboe, Bassoon, Violin, Cello and Chamber Orchestra)
EMI CLASSICS GEMINI 64350-2 (2 CDs) (2009)
(original LP release: HMV ASD 3888) (1980)


Symphony No. 5 (1946)

Karel Ančerl/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 5 and Memorial to Lidice)
SUPRAPHON SU 3694-2 (2004)
(original LP release: SUPRAPHON DM 5599) (1960)

Karel Ančerl/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1962)
( + Symphonies Nos. 1 and 5)
MULTISONIC 31 0023-2 (2 CDs) (1991)

Karel Ančerl/Toronto Symphony Orchestra (rec. 1971)
( + Dvo·ák: Symphony No. 8, Slavonic Dance No. 8, V. Novák: In the Tatras, Shostakovich: Festive Overture, Janáček: Taras Bulba, Mácha: Variations on a Theme by and on the Death of Jan Rychlík, Smetana: Má Vlast- The Moldau and Krejčí: Serenade)
EMI GREAT CONDUCTORS OF THE 20TH CENTURY 575091-2 (2 CDs) (2002)

Jiří Bělohlávek/BBC Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6)
ONYX ONYX4061 (3 CDs) (2011)

Jiří Bělohlávek/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 6)
SUPRAPHON SU 4007-2 (2009)

Arthur Fagen/Ukrainian National Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 3)
NAXOS 8.553350 (2002)

Claus Peter Flor/Berlin Symphony Orchestra (1988)
( + Symphony No. 6)
RCA VICTOR RED SEAL 7806/RD 87805 (1990)

Neeme Järvi/Bamberg Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6)
BIS CD-1371-2 (2 CDs) (2003)
(original CD release: BIS CD-402 (1988)

Václav Neumann/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 6 and Inventions for Piano and Orchestra)
SUPRAPHON 111968 (1995)
(original release: SUPRAPHON 14102771 {2 LPs}) (1979)

Gennady Rozhdestvensky/USSR State Symphony Orchestra (rec. 1985)
( + Symphony No. 6)
RUSSIAN REVELATION 10005 (1996)

Bryden Thomson/Royal Scottish National Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6)
CHANDOS CHAN 10316 (3 CDs) (2005)
(original CD release: CHANDOS CHAN 8915 (1991)

Otakar Trhlik/Janáček Philharmonic Orchestra, Ostrava (rec. 1980)
( + Symphony No. 4)
PANTON 8112052 (1991)
(original LP release: PANTON 81100163) (1981)

Vladimír Válek/Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6)
SUPRAPHON SU 3940-2 (3 CDs) (2008)

Robert Whitney/Louisville Orchestra
( + Oboe Concerto, Intermezzo and Éstampes)
FIRST EDITION FECD-0018 (2003)
(original LP release: LOUISVILLE LS 663) (1966)


Symphony No. 6 "Fantaisies Symphoniques" (1953)

Karel Ančerl/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1955)
( + Symphony No. 5 and Memorial to Lidice)
SUPRAPHON SU 3694-2 (2004)
(original LP release: SUPRAPHON DV 5475) (1960)

Karel Ančerl/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1962)
(included in collection: "Karel Ančerl-Live Recordings")
TAHRA ANC 001 (7 CDs) (2001)

Jiří Bělohlávek/BBC Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5)
ONYX ONYX4061 (3 CDs) (2011)

Jiří Bělohlávek/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Suk: Scherzo Fantastique and Janáček: Sinfonietta)
CHANDOS CHAN 8897 (1990)

Jiří Bělohlávek/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Mahler: Lieder eines Fahrenden Gesellen)
SUPRAPHON SU 3026-2 (1996)

Jiří Bělohlávek/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 5)
SUPRAPHON SU 4007-2 (2009)

Michael Bialoguski/New Philharmonia Orchestra
( + Vořišek: Symphony in D)
UNICORN RHS 309 (LP) (1977)

Arthur Fagen/Ukrainian National Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 1)
NAXOS 8.553348 (2000)

Claus Peter Flor/Berlin Symphony Orchestra (1988)
( + Symphony No. 5)
RCA VICTOR RED SEAL 7806/RD 87805 (1990)

Neeme Järvi/Bamberg Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5)
BIS CD-1371-2 (2 CDs) (2003)
(original CD release: BIS CD-402 (1988)

Jiří Kout/St. Gallen Symphony Orchestra
( + Frescoes of Piero della Francesca and Julietta: Ballet Suite)
ARTE NOVA 8287657740-2 (2004)

Charles Munch/Boston Symphony Orchestra
( + Saint-Saëns: La Princesse Jaune- Overture, Beethoven: Symphony No. 9, Berlioz: Corsair Overture, Mendelssohn: Octet-Scherzo, Bizet: Symphony in C and Prokofiev: Romeo and Juliet-Selections)
EMI GREAT CONDUCTORS OF THE 20TH CENTURY 5 75477 2 (2 CDs) (2002)
(original LP release: RCA VICTOR LM-2083/RCA RB 16030) (1957)

Charles Munch/Czechoslovak Radio Symphony Orchestra, Prague (rec. 1967)
(included in collection: "The Prague Spring Festival: Legendary Broadcast Recordings, 1947-1968")
NAÏVE/ANDANTE AN 2150 (4 CDs) (2006)
(original CD release: PANTON 8111222) (1993)

Václav Neumann/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 5 and Inventions for Piano and Orchestra)
SUPRAPHON 111968 (1995)
(original LP release: SUPRAPHON 1102096) (1978)

Jaromir Nohejl/Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra, Olomouc
( + Krejčí: 14 Variations on a Folksong)
PANTON 8110 0028 (LP) (1979)

Gennady Rozhdestvensky/USSR State Symphony Orchestra (rec. 1985)
( + Symphony No. 6)
RUSSIAN REVELATION 10005 (1996)

Wolfgang Sawallisch/Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra (rec. 1986)
(included in collection: "Anthology of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, VOL. 5-The Radio Recordings 1980-1990")
RCO LIVE RCO08005 (14 CDs) (2009)

Ladislav Slovák/Prague Symphony Orchestra
( + Režác: Sinfonietta and Loudova: Chorale)
PANTON 8113 73-2 (1995)

Bryden Thomson/Royal Scottish National Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5)
CHANDOS CHAN 10316 (3 CDs) (2005)
(original CD release: CHANDOS CHAN 8916) (1991)

Vladimír Válek/Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra (rec. 1986)
( + Memorial to Lidice, Frescoes of Piero della Francesca and Vigile)
PRAGA PR 254050 (1994)

Vladimír Válek/Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5)
SUPRAPHON SU 3940-2 (3 CDs) (2008)


Sinfonia Concertante No.1 for 2 Orchestras (1932)

Jiří Bělohlávek/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Overture, La Rhapsodie, Concerto Grosso and Parables)
SUPRAPHON SU 3743-2 (2003)
(original LP releae: SUPRAPHON 110381)


Sinfonia Concertante No. 2, for Violin, Cello, Oboe, Bassoon and Chamber Orchestra (1949)

Richard Hickox/Nicholas Daniel (oboe)/Stephen Reay (bassoon)/Andrew Watkinson (violin)/
Stephen Orton (cello)/City of London Sinfonia
( + Symphony No. 4, Memorial to Lidice, Frescoes of Piero della Francesca for Orchestra, Double Concerto for 2 String Orchestras, Concerto for String Quartet and Orchestra and Sinfonietta La Jolla)
EMI CLASSICS GEMINI 64350-2 (2 CDs) (2009)
(original CD release: VIRGIN CLASSICS VC7 91099-2 (1991)

Christopher Hogwood/Julia Schröder (violin)/Christoph Dangel (cello)/Matthias Arter (oboe)/Matthias Bühlmann (bassoon)/Basel Chamber Orchestra
( + Haydn: Sinfonia Concertant for Violin, Cello, Oboe and Bassoon and Mozart: Sinfonia Concertante for Violin and Viola)
ARTE NOVA 82876 86375-2 (2006)

Zdeněk Košler/Bruno Belčk (violin)/Karel Novotný (cello)/Ji·í Mihule (oboe)/Ji·í Formácek (bassoon) (oboe)/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Rhapsody-Concerto for Viola and Orchestra)
SUPRAPHON 1110 3378 (LP) (1984)


Sinfonietta Giocosa for Piano and Small Orchestra (1940, rev. 1941)

Bohumil Gregor/Jan Panenka (piano)/Prague Chamber Orchestra
( + Piano Concertino "Divertimento")
SUPRAPHON 1103732 (1990)
(original LP release: SUPRAPHON 110373)

Zdeněk Košler/Jan Panenka (piano)/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Concertino for Piano Trio and Strings)
SUPRAPHON 410 2198 (LP) (1977)

Jaroslav Krombholc/Germaine Leroux (piano)/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Janáček: Lachian Dances)
MERCURY MG 10040 (LP)

Charles Mackerras/Dennis Hennig (piano)/Australian Chamber Orchestra
( + Rhapsody Concerto for Viola and Concerto for Piano, Percussion and Strings)
CONIFER 75605-512102 (1992)

Václav Neumann/Jan Panenka (piano)/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Concertino for Piano Trio and String Orchestra)
SUPRAPHON 14102198 (LP)

Gennady Rozhdestvensky/Anatoly Vedernikov (piano)/Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Hidas: Oboe Concerto)
MELODIYA SM 02727-8 (LP) (1971)

Václav Smetá·ek/Stanislav Knor (piano)/Prague Symphony Orchestra
( + Piano Concerto No. 4)
SUPRAPHON SUA ST 58591/ERATO STU 70428 (LP)

Tamás Vasary/Julian Jacobson (piano)/Bournemouth Sinfonietta
( + Sinfonietta La Jolla and Toccata e Due Canzoni)
CHANDOS CHAN 8859 (1990)

Pascal Verrot/Claire Désert (piano)/Orchestre de Picardie
( + Toccata e due Canzoni and Jazz Suite)
CALLIOPE CAL9394 (2009)


Sinfonietta La Jolla for Piano and Small Orchestra (1950)

James Conlon/Jean-François Heisser (piano)/Orchestre National de France
( + Concerto for Piano, Percussion and Strings, Concerto for String Orchestra, Ricercari and Toccata e Due Canzoni)
ERATO 3984-24238-2 (2 CDs) (1999)
(original CD release: ERATO 2292-45794-2) (1992)

Libor Hlaváček/Pardubice Chamber Phulharmonia
( + Voříšek: Symphony in D)
PANTON 81100369 (LP)

Zdeněk Hnát (piano)/Prague Chamber Orchestra
( + Toccata e Due Canzone)
SUPRAPHON 1110 1619 (LP) (1974)

Christopher Hogwood/Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra
( + La Revue de Cuisine, Merry Christmas 1941, Ricercari and Toccata e Due Canzone)
DECCA 4336 602 (1993)

Marko Ivanovic/Czech Chamber Philharmonic Orchestra, Pardubice
( + Beethoven: Symphony No.2 and Smetana: Festive Symphony-Scherzo)
ARCO DIVA UP 0136-2 131 (2011)

Ondrej Kukal/Josef Hála (piano)/Prague Chamber Orchestra
( + Concerto Grosso and Toccata e Due Canzoni)
SUPRAPHON SU 3958-2 (1998)

Nikolai Sokoloff/Orchestra of the Musical Arts Society
( + Britten: Les Illumnations)
ALCO ALP 1211 (LP) (1950s)

Václav Jan Sykora (piano)/Prague Chamber Orchestra
( + Toccata e Due Canzoni)
SUPRAPHON SUA 10135 (LP) (1950s)

Jan Valta/Marta Singerová (piano)/Zilina State Chamber Orchestra
( + Respighi: Trittico Botticelliano)
OPUS 9350 1844 (1990)
(original LP release: OPUS 93101844)

Tamás Vasary/Julian Jacobson (piano)/Bournemouth Sinfonietta
( + Sinfonietta Giocosa and Toccata e Due Canzoni)
CHANDOS CHAN 8859 (1990)

Walter Weller/Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 4, Memorial to Lidice, Frescoes of Piero della Francesca for Orchestra, Double Concerto for 2 String Orchestras, Concerto for String Quartet and Orchestra and Sinfonia Concertante for Oboe, Bassoon, Violin, Cello and Chamber Orchestra)
EMI CLASSICS GEMINI 64350-2 (2 CDs) (2009)
(original LP release: HMV ASD 3888) (1980)




LOVRO VON MATAČIĆ
(1899-1985, CROATIAN)

Born in Sušak. He was a member of the Vienna Boys Choir and studied piano, organ, composition and conducting at the Vienna Hochschule für Musik where one of his conducting teachers was Oskar Nedbal. He had a brilliant career as an orchestral and operatic conductor both in Yugoslavia and other European locations. He composed few works.

Symphony of Confrontations (1979)

Lovro von Matačić/NHK Symphony Orchestra
DENON 33CO-1004 (1986)




JOSEF MATĚJ
(1922-1992, CZECH)

Born in Brušperk, Moravia. He first studied with František Míta Hradil at the Masaryk Institute of Music and Singing in Ostrava and then studied composition with Emil Hlobil as well as organ at the Prague Conservatory. He moved on to the Academy of Musical Arts for further training in composition with Jaroslav Řídký and Karel Janeček. He was a lecturer in music theory and composition teacher on the drama faculty of the Academy before becoming a full-time composer. He composed an opera and a ballet as well as orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. His unrecorded Symphonies are: Nos. 1 (1956) and 2 (1960).

Symphony No. 3 "Sinfonia Dramatica" (1970)

Josef Hrnčíř/Czechoslovak Radio Symphony Orchestra, Prague
( + Podešva: Symphony No. 6)
PANTON 11 0269 (LP) (1971)


Symphony No. 4 (1974)

Josef Hrnčíř/Czechoslovak Radio Symphony Orchestra, Prague (rec. 1975)
( + Doubrava: Symphony No. 2)
PANTON 81 0902 (LP) (1989)
(original LP release: SUPRAPHON 110 1958)) (1978)

Symphony No. 5 (1977)

Zdeněk Košler/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Lukáš: Bagatelles)
PANTON 8110 0125 (LP) (1981)




KRZYSZTOF MEYER
(b.1943, POLAND)

Born in Kraków. He learned the piano as a child and then studied theory and composition with Stanislaw Wiechowicz. After graduating from the Fryderyk Chopin State Secondary School of Music in Kraków, he began to study composition at the College of Music in Kraków under Krzysztof Penderecki as well as theory with Aleksander Fraczkiewicz. He then had further studies with Nadia Boulanger in France and in Warsaw he became a private pupil of Witold Lutosławski. He first appeared as a pianist, often playing his own works, and then taught theoretical subjects at the Academy of Music in Kraków. He then became head of the Department of Music Theory and he also teaches composition in Hochschule für Musik in Cologne. He has composed music for the theater and concert hall as well as music for children and film scores. His unrecorded Symphonies are: Nos. 1 (1964 ), 2 for Mixed Choir and Orchestra "Epitaphium Stanislaw Wiechoicz in Memoriam" (1967) and 3 for Chorus and Orchestra "Symphonie d'Orphee" (1968 as well as Symphony in D major "In Mozartean Style" (1976).

Symphony No. 4, Op. 31 (1973)

Jerzy Maksymiuk/Polish Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + A. Bloch: Jubilate)
MUZA SX 1313 (1965 WARSAW AUTUMN non-commercial LP) (1975)

Antoni Wit/Krakow Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Hommage à Johannes Brahms)
MUZA SX 2696 (LP) (1990)


Symphony No. 5 for 15 Strings, Op. 44 (1979)

Jerzy Maksymiuk/Polish Chamber Orchestra
( + Stachowski: Divertimento)
MUZA SX 1848 (1965 WARSAW AUTUMN non-commercial LP) (1979)


Symphony No. 6, Op. 57 "Symfonia Polska" (1982)

Christopher Keene/NDR Symphony Orchestra
PROVIVA ISPV 127 (LP) (1985)

Antoni Wit/Polish Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Canti Amadei)
PROVIVA ISPV 179 (1998).


Symphony No. 7, Op. 97 "Sinfonia del Tempo che Passa" (2003)

Gabriel Chmura/Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra, Katowice
( + Concerto for Violin, Cello and Orchestra)
DUX DUX0695 (2009)

 

COSTIN MIEREANU
(b. 1943, ROMANIAN > FRANCE)

Born in Bucharest. He studied at the Music Academy of Bucharest with Alfred Mendelsohn, Dan Constantinescu, and Lazar Octavian Cosma and later in Paris at the École des Hautes Études et Sciences Sociales and Schola Cantorum. In addition, he was a student of Karlheinz Stockhausen, György Ligeti, and Ehrhard Karkoschka at the Internationale Ferienkurse für neue Musik in Darmstadt. He settled permanently in France where he became a Professor of Philosophy, Aesthetics, and the Science of Art at the Sorbonne. He has composed in various genres ranging from opera to aleatoric works. A later work is Symphony No. 3 "Blick auf die Frühe" (2001).

Symphony No..1 "Un Temps sans Memoire" (1989-92)

François-Xavier Bilger/Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France (rec. 1982)
( + Voyage d'Hiver II, Miroirs Celestes and Rosenzeit)
SALABERT SCD 9501 (1995)


ANDRÁS MIHÁLY
(1917-1993, HUNGARY)

Born in Budapest. He entered the Liszt Academy of Music in 1934 as a cello pupil of Adolf Schiffer but also studied chamber music with Leo Weiner and then took private lessons in composition with Pál Kadosa and István Strasser. He worked as a cellist and choral conductor and was appointed professor of chamber music at the Budapest Academy and later music adviser to the music section of Hungarian Broadcasting. He composed an opera as well as orchestral, chamber and indtrumental works. His earlier Symphonies are: Nos.1 "‘Sinfonia da Requiem" (1946) and 2 (1950).

Symphony No. 3 (1962)

György Lehel/Hungarian Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Apokryphs and Psalms of Rapture)
HUNGAROTON SLPX 11455 (LP) (1971)




PAVEL MIHELČIČ
(b.1937, SLOVENE)

Born in Novo Mesto. He studied composition with Matija Bravničar at the Ljubljana Academy of Music. He taught music theory at the Ljubljana Secondary School of Music, then worked as music editor at Radio Slovenia was appointed assistant professor of composition at the Ljubljana Academy of Music. He composed orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. He composed a Sinfonietta No. 2 for Chamber Orchestra in 2003.

Sinfonietta (No. 1) for Woodwinds, Brass and Percussion (1990)


Anton Nanut/Slovenian Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Solange - Concerto for Oboe, Harp, Strings and Percussion, Exposition and Reflections, Games and Reflections, Free Landing and Return to Silence)
EDICIJ DSS 997009




PREDRAG MILOŠEVIĆ
(1904-1988, SERBIAN)

Born in b Knjaževac. He first studied at the Belgarde Music School and at the Munich Academy. He then went on to study piano and conducting at the Prague Conservatory as well as composition with Jaroslav Kŕička and also attended Josef Suk's master classes. He became an important force in Serbian music as an orchestral and operatic conductor as well as a teacher of composition and conducting at the Belgrade Academy of Music. His catalogue comprises chamber and instrumental works and many scores for theater productions.

Sinfonietta (1930)

Mladen Jagušt/Belgrade Radio Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Sonatina)
RTB LP 2510 (LP) (1970s)




EMIL MŁYNARSKI
(1870-1935, POLISH)

Born in Kibarty, near Suwałki. He studied at the St. Petersburg Conservatory with Leopold Auer for violin and Anatol Lyadov for composition. While a student, he led the Imperial Musical Society Orchestra and was a member of Auer’s String Quartet. He first taught in Odessa but returned to Poland as a conductor and director of the Warsaw Conservatory. An eminent conductor, he held appointments with the Scottish Orchestra and at the Curtis Institute and worked in London, Moscow and Paris. As a composer he is best known for his Violin Concertos but he also wrote other orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works.

Symphony in F major, Op. 14 "Polonia" (1910)

Kazimierz Kord/Warsaw National Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra
( + Violin Concerto No. 2)
POLSKIE NAGRANIA PNCD 074 (1990)




VASILIJE MOKRANJAC
(1923-1984, SERBIAN)

Born in Belgrade. He graduated from the piano class of Emil Hajek and the composition class of Stanojlo Rajićić at the Belgrade Academy of Music, where he later became professor of composition and orchestration. He composed orchestral, chamber and piano works as well as incidental music. Among his other orchestral woorks is a Sinfonietta for Strings (1969).

Symphony No. 1 in A major (1961)

Mladen Jagust/Belgrade Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Overture and Lyric Poem)
RTB 2518 (LP) (1970s)


Symphony No. 2 (1965)

Živojin Zdravković/Belgrade Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 4 and 5, Overture and Lyric Poem)
UKS SOKOJ MIC 7003 (1998)


Symphony No. 3 (1967)

Živojin Zdravković/Belgrade Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Ulrich: Piano Concerto No 1)
RTB JSM 6 (LP)


Symphony No. 4 (1972)

Živojin Zdravković/Belgrade Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 2 and 5, Overture and Lyric Poem)
UKS SOKOJ MIC SO507 (1998)


Symphony No. 5 "Quasi un Poema" (1978)

Mladen Jagust/Belgrade Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 2 and 4, Overture and Lyric Poem)
UKS SOKOJ MIC 7003 (1998)




OSKAR MORAWETZ
(1917-2007, CZECH > CANADA)

Born in Světlá nad Sázavou, Bohemia. He had his musical training with Jaroslav Kŕička in Prague, Julius Isserlis in Vienna and Lazare Lévy in Paris. Nazism necessitated his emigration to Canada in 1942 where he completed his musical education at the University of Toronto. In addition to composing, he had a distinguished teaching career at the Royal Conservatory of Music of Toronto and the University of Toronto. He composed music in almost all instrumental genres as welll as vocal works. His Symphony No. 1 (1950-3) has movements that can be played as independent works and he also wrote a Sinfonietta for Strings (1963) as well as Concertos for Piano, Harp and Clarinet.

Symphony No. 2 (1959)

Jean Deslauriers/Toronto Symphony Orchestra
( + Weinzweig: Piano Concerto and Symonds: The Nameless Hour)
CBC BR SM-104 (LP) (1969)


Sinfonietta for Winds and Percussion (1965)

Jean Deslauriers/Ensembles d'Instruments à Vent de Montréal
( + Weinzweig: Divertimento No. 5 and Morel: Prismes-Anamorphoses)
RADIO CANADA INTERNATIONAL RCI-292 (LP) (1969)


IGNAZ MOSCHELES
(1794-1870, CZECH)

Born in Prague. He had piano lessons as a child and was then taught by B.D. Weber, director of the Prague Conservatory. Moving to Vienna, he studied counterpoint with Johann Georg Albrechtsberger and composition with Antonio Salieri. He achieved fame as a pianist, conductor, teacher and composer and was a close associate of Felix Mendelssohn. He composed in varios genres but his catalogue is highly weighted towards music for the piano (including 8 Concertos) and chamber music.

Symphony No. 1 in C major, Op 81 (1829)

Nikos Athinäos/Brandenburg State Orchestra, Frankfurt
( + Piano Concerto No. 6 and The Maid of Orleans: Overture)
CHRISTOPHORUS ENTRÉE CHE 0135-2 (2008)


MIHÁLY MOSONYI (MICHAEL BRAND)
(1815-1870, HUNGARIAN)

Born in Boldogasszonyfalva, Hungary (now Frauenkirchen, Austria). He learned wind instruments as a child and then taught himself music by copying Hummel's manual of exercises for the piano. He worked as a journeyman musician (as well as other occupations) while he studied the piano and music theory with Károly Turányi. He obtained a position as a piano teacher and became an accomplished pianist and composer. His copious catalogue covers all musical genres from opera to pieces for solo voices and instruments. He wrote a Symphony No. 2 in A minor in 1846.

Symphony No. 1 in D major (1843-4)

Robert Stankovsky/Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra, Bratislava
( + Piano Concerto)
MARCO POLO 8223539 (1994)

 

PIOTR MOSS
(b. 1949, POLISH)

Born in Bydgoszcz. He studied composition with Piotr Perkowski at the State Higher School of Music in Warsaw and continued his studies with Nadia Boulanger in Paris. He has lived in Paris since 1981. A prolific composer, his catalogue covers the genres of orchestral, chamber, instrumental, choral and vocal works. Among his other orchestral works are “Charon” Symphony (1972) and Sinfonia in Dieci Parti (1978).

Symphonie Concertante for Flute, Piano and Orchestra (1985)

Zbigniew Graca/Elzbieta Gajewska (flute)/Barbara Halska (piano)/Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Krakow
( + Piano Concerto "Portraits" and Adagio No. 3)
DUX 0839 (2011)


ALEXANDER MOYZES
(1906-1984, SLOVAK)

Born in Kláštor pod Znievom, the son of composer Mikuláš Moyzes (1872-1944). He studied at the Conservatory in Prague where his teachers included Otakar Šín for composition, Jaroslav Kŕička for orchestration, Karel Bohuslav Jirák for musical forms and Otakar Ostrčil for conducting. He then attended the composition master classes of Vitězslav Novák. He became a teacher of theoretical subjects and composition at the Bratislava Academy of Music and Drama (later renamed to the State Conservatory) in Bratislava and the head of the Department of Music of the Czechoslovak Radio in Bratislava among other important posts and honors. He composed in various genres but his biggest contributions are in the fields of orchestral and chamber works. There are also 2 unrecorded Symphonies: Sinfonia-Cantata, Op. 12 for Tenor, Mixed Chorus and Orchestra " Demontage" (1930-1932) and Sinfonia da Chiesa, Op. 36 for Soprano, Tenor, Baritone, organ, Mixed Chorus and Orchestra (1941-2).

Symphony No. 1 in D major, Op. 4, (1929, rev. 1936)

L'udovit Rajter/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Ferenczy: Hurbanovska Overture)
SUPRAPHON LPV 356 (LP) (1960s)

Ladislav Slovák/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
( + In Autumn)
OPUS 9110 1290 (LP) (1982)

Ladislav Slovák/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1993)
( + Symphony No. 2)
MARCO POLO 8.225088 (2000)


Symphony No. 2 in A mnor, Op. 16 for Soprano, Tenor and Orchestra (1932, rev. for orch . only 1941)

Ladislav Slovák/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1994)
( + Symphony No. 2)
MARCO POLO 8.225088 (2000)


Symphony No. 3 in B flat major, Op. 18 "Little Symphony" (arr. of Wind Quintet, 1933/1942)

Ladislav Slovák/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1994)
( + Symphony No. 4)
MARCO POLO 8.225089 (2000)


Symphony No. 4 in E flat major, Op. 38 (1947, rev. 1957)

Ladislav Slovák/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
SUPRAPHON DV 5947 (LP) (1963)

Ladislav Slovák/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1993)
( + Symphony No. 3)
MARCO POLO 8.225089 (2000)


Symphony No. 5 in F major, Op. 39, 1948 (arr. from Mikuláš Moyzes "Little Highland Symphony", 1936/1948)

Ladislav Slovák/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1973)
( + Symphony No. 6)
MARCO POLO 8.225090 (2001)


Symphony No. 6 in G major, Op. 45 (1951)

Ladislav Slovák/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1994)
( + Symphony No. 5)
MARCO POLO 8.225090 (2001)


Symphony No. 7, Op. 50 (1955)

Laldislav Slovák/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Babušek: Preludium)
SUPRAPHON DM 5468–9 (2 LPs) (1957)

Ladislav Slovák/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1990)
( + Symphony No. 8)
MARCO POLO 8.225091 (2001)


Symphony No. 8, Op. 64 (1969)

Ladislav Slovák/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1994)
( + Symphony No. 7)
MARCO POLO 8.225091 (2001)

Symphony No. 9, Op. 69 (1971)

Ladislav Slovák/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1995)
( + Symphony No. 10)
MARCO POLO 8.225092 (2001)


Symphony No. 10, Op. 77 (1978)

Ladislav Slovák/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1994)
( + Symphony No. 9)
MARCO POLO 8.225092 (2001)


Symphony No. 11, Op. 79 (1978)

Ladislav Slovák/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1993)
( + Symphony No. 12)
MARCO POLO 8.225093 (2002)

Symphony No. 12, Op. 83 (1983)

Bystrík Režucha/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Kardoš: Symphony No. 7)
OPUS 9310 1634 (LP) (1986)

Ladislav Slovák/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1995)
( + Symphony No. 11)
MARCO POLO 8.225093 (2001)


REXHO MULLIQI
(1923–1982, ALBANIAN/KOSOVAR)

Born in Guci, Montenegro. His initial musical training was in his hometown and then in Skopje, Macedonia. Later he enrolled at the Academy of Music in Belgrade but could not finish his studies because of political reasons. After some time in prison, he returned to Kosovo where he initially taught harmony and counterpoint at the Music High School in Pristina. He is one of the creators of professional musical tradition in Kosovo as well as the author of the first symphony by an Albanian in Kosovo and the second in all of Albanian music. His compositions cover the whole spectrum of genres with the exception of opera. His Symphony No. 1 (1955) has not been recorded.


Symphony No. 2 "Kosovarian" (1972)

Samo Hubad / Radio and Television Ljubljana Symphony Orchestra
RTB NL-25 (non-commercial LP) (1970s)


VIOREL MUNTEANU
(b. 1944, ROMANIAN

Born in the town of Suceava Reuseni. He has composed vocal-symphonic, symphonic, chamber, choral, and pop music, and is also a conductor and arranger. His academic career includes an appointment as Rector of the "George Enescu" University of Arts in Iaşi.

Symphony No. 1 for Tenor, Chorus and Orchestra "Glossa"

M. Budoiu (tenor)/Ovidiu Balan/ Romanian Radio Chorus and Orchestra
( + Odăgescu-Ţuţuianu: Choregraphic Poem and Tăutu: Piano Concerto)
ROMANIAN MINISTRY OF CULTURE EDITURA MUZICALA 041 (non-commercial CD) (2006)

ZYGMUNT MYCIELSKI
(1907-1987, POLISH)

Born in Przeworsk. His musical education began in Kraków before going for composition studies with Nadia Boulanger and Paul Dukas in Paris. After service during World War II, he took a leading role in Polish music as a music critic and President of the Polish Union of Composers. He composed a ballet, orchestral, chamber, choral and vocal works. His unrecorded Symphonies are: Nos. 2 (1961), 3 "Sinfonia Breve" (1967), 4 (1961), 5 (1977) and 6 "Piesni" (Songs) (1985-6).

Symphony No. 1 "Polish Symphony" (1951)

Jerzy Gert/Kraków Radio Symphony Orchestra
MUZA L-0099 (LP) (1950s)

 

PAWEŁ MYKIETYN
(b. 1971, POLISH)

Born in Oława. He studied composition with Włodzimierz Kotoński in 1997 at the Warsaw Academy of Music. He plays the clarinet in the Nonstrom Ensemble, a group founded by the composer himself that specializes in the performance of contemporary music. He composes mostly orchestral, chamber and instrumental works.

Symphony No. 2 (2007)

Reinbert de Leeuw/National Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Serocki: Fantasia Elegiaca, Sikora: Le Chant de Salomon and Szymański: Ceci n'est pas une Ouverture)
WARSAW AUTUMN 2007-CD No. 3, POLMIC 032 (non-commercial) (2008)



OCTAVIAN NEMESCU
(b.1940, ROMANIAN)

Born in in Pascani. He studied composition with Mihail Jora at the Conservatory of Music in Bucharest and also attended the International Summer Master Classes in Darmstadt, Germany. He completed his studies at the Conservatory in Cluj, studying musicology with of Sigismund Toduţă. He has composed orchestral, chamber, choral, electro-acoustic, multimedia, metamusic, imaginary, and ritual works. His other works with "Symphony" in their titles are: Pre-Symphony No. 6 "of the Beginnings" for Orchestra, Spectacular Stage of Music (1996-2000), Pluri Symphony No. 1 for Mixed Chorus, Orchestra and Spectacular Stage of Music (2002) and Post-Symphony No. 2 for Orchestra and Spectacular Stage of Music (2003).

Non-Symphony No. 5 "Of the Endings" for Orchestra and Spectacular Stage of Music (1988-92)

Horia Andreescu/ Romanian National Radio Orchestra
(included in collection: "Romanian Symphonic Works, Volume 3")
EDITURA MUSICALA (UMCR) 006-7 (2 CDs) (2000)




ŞERBAN NICHIFOR
(b.1954, ROMANIAN)

Born in Bucharest. After studying the cello with Serafim Antropov at the Bucharest Academy, he took private composition lessons with Aurel Stroe and Walter Klepper. He then had further composition studies in Darmstadt, Germany and with Ton de Leeuw in Breukelen, Holland and with with Sergiu Celibidache in Munich. He has taught in the chamber music class at the Bucharest Academy. His catalogue includes an opera, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. His later Symphonies are: Nos. 5 for Chorus and Orchestra "Pro Patria" (1987), 6 "Arc in Time" (1988) and 7 "Cello-Memoirs" (2003).

Symphony No. 1 for Orchestra and Tape "Umbre" (1980)

Mircea Basarab/George Enescu Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra, Bucharest
( + Symphony No. 2)
ELECTRECORD ST-ECE 2824 (LP) (1980s)


Symphony No. 2 "Via Lucis" (1983-5)

Mircea Basarab/ George Enescu Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra, Bucharest
( + Symphony No. 1)
ELECTRECORD ST-ECE 2824 (LP) (1980s)

Symphony No. 3 "Echoes and Visions from Eastern America" (1985-6)

Szalman Lóránt/Tîrgu-Mureş Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 4)
ELECTRECORD ST-ECE 3482 (LP) (c. 1988)

Symphony No. 4 "From West to East" (1986-7)

Paul Popescu/Romanian Radio Television National Orchestra
( + Constantinescu: Violin Concerto and Toduţă: 4 Tablutures for Lute by Bakfark)
OLYMPIA OCD 417 (1991)
(original LP release: ELECTRECORD ST-ECE 3482) (c. 1988)



DIMITRI NICOLAU
(1946-2008. GREEK > ITALY)

Born in Keratea, Attica. He had his musical studies in Greece and France. Political opposition to the regime caused his relocation to Italy in 1967 where he eventually became a naturalized citizen. There he became a cinematographer as well as a composer. He was a teacher of stage song and vocal theatrical technique at the Institute of Ancient Drama of Syracuse, the Theatrical Academy of Calabria and the Theater of Calabria. A prolific composer, his output covers the genres of operas and film scores as well as orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works.His other Symphonies are: Nos. 1, Op. 50 for Strings and Percussion, 2, Op. Trumpets, Strings and Percussion, 3, Op. 54 for Contralto and Small Orchestra , 5, Op. 101 for Large Orchestra and Symphonie d'Été, Op. 18 for Large Orchestra.

Quarta Sinfonia (Symphony No. 4), Op. 70 for Voice and Saxophone Orchestra (1986)

Federico Mondelci/M.A. Rossi Berluti (soprano)/Ensemblo. Italiano di Sassofoni
( + Cesa: Citt? Viva, Citt? Morta, Citt?..., Tesei: Gesta and Minciacchi:The Rainbow Serpent No. 5)
EDIPAN PRC S2061 (LP) (1980s)


ŞTEFAN NICULESCU
(1927-2008, ROMANIAN)

Born in Moreni, Dâmboviţa. He studied in Bucharest at the Royal Academy of Music, the Polytechnic Institute and the Academy of Music with Mihail Andricu for composition, Mihail Jora for harmony and Muza Ghermani-Ciomac for piano. In Germany, he attended the Darmstadt summer courses and Mauricio Kagel's electronic music course in Munich. He worked as a piano teacher, researcher at the Institute of Art History and then taught composition and analysis at the Bucharest Academy of Music. He has composed a children's opera, orchestral, chamber, instrumental, choral and vocal works. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 1 (1975), 4 "Deisis" (1995) and 5 "Litanies" (1997).

Symphony No. 2 "Opus Dacicum" (1980)

Remus Georgescu/Timişoara Banatul Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Taranu: Symphony No. 2 and Bentoiu: Symphony No. 5)
OLYMPIA OCD 416 (1991)
(original LP release: ELECTRECORD ST-ECE 02036) (1983)


Symphony No. 3 (Concertante Symphony for Saxophone and Orchestra) "Cantos" (1984)

Iosif Conta/Daniel Kientzy (saxophone)/ Romanian Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Marbe: Concerto for Daniel Kientzy and Vieru: Narration II)
OLYMPIA OCD 410 (1990)
(original LP release: ELECTRECORD ST-CS 0197) (1986)

Symphony No. 4 "Deisis" (1995)

Arturo Tamayo/ÖRF Radio Symphony Orchestra, Vienna
( + Olah: Symphony No. 4, Vieru: Memorial and Marbe: Serenade)
ROMANIAN MINISTRY OF CULTURE EDITURA MUZICALA 004 (2000)

Symphony for 15 Soloists (1963)

Constantin Bugeanu/Cinematography Symphony Orchestra
( + Glodeanu: Piano Concerto and Stroe: Arcades)
ELECTRECORD ECE 0159 )LP) (1970s)


LAZAR NIKOLOV
(1922-2005, BULGARIAN)

Born in Sofia. His musical education was at the State High Musical School and then the State Academy Of Music where he studied composition with Marin Goleminov. After graduating, he became a Musical Editor for the Bulgarian National Radio and taught at the Sofia State Academy. He composed operas, orchestral, chamber, piano and vocal works. There is a Symphony No. 2 for 2 Oianos and Orchestra (1960-1).

Symphony No. 1 (1953)

Dobrin Petkov/Bulgarian National Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Piano Concerto No. 2)
BALKANTON BCA 1300/435 (LP) (c. 1980)


Symphonies for 13 Strings (1965)

Vasil KazandzhievSofia Soloists Chamber Orchestra
( + Divertimento Concertante)
BALKANTON BCA 1308 (LP) (1970s)




ZYGMUNT NOSKOWSKI
(1846-1909, POLISH)

Born in Warsaw. He studied at the Warsaw Music Institute where his teachers included Apolinary Katski for violin and Stanisław Moniuszko for harmony. He went to Berlin to study composition with Friedrich Kiel and orchestration with R.F. Wuersta. He was an important force in 19th century Polish musical life, as director of the Warsaw Music Society where he was active as a teacher and concert organizer, professor of composition at the Music Institute as well as director and conductor of the Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra and director of the Warsaw Opera. He composed operas, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 2 C in minor "Elegiac" (1879) and 3 in F "From Spring to Spring" (1904).

Symphony No. 1 in A major (1875)

Sławek Wróblewski/Polish National Symphony Orchestra
( + Morskie Oko and Pan Zolzikiewicz Overture)
STERLING CDS 1083-2 (2010)

Symphony No. 2 in C minor "Elegiac" (1879)

Łukasz Borowicz/Polish Radio Orchestra
( + Odgłosy Pamiątkowe (Memorial Sounds) and Variations on an Original Theme)
STERLING CDS 1093-2 (2011)



PAVEL NOVÁK-ZEMEK
(b.1957, CZECH)

Born in Brno. He studied oboe and composition at the Brno Conservatory and continued his studies with Miloslav Ištvan at the Janáček Academy of Music and later completed his education studying in London with George Benjamin and in Paris with Gérard Grisey. He was employed as a first oboist of the orchestra at Janáček's Theatre in Brno and now teaches composition at the Brno Conservatory as well as the Janáček Academy of Music. He has composed orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 1 in 7 Movements (1987), 2 for 9 Soloists, Mixed Choir and Orchestra "Passion After St. John" (1990-7), 3 for piano and 10 String Instruments "Medjugorie" (1995-2002), 4 in 5 Movements "Unisono for Orchestra" (2002) and 5 "Streams of the Miséricorde and Light in the St James Church in Brno" (2004) and also Chamber Symphony No. 2 for Clarinet and 10 String Instruments "Hommage to St Francesco d'Assisi" (1988).

Chamber Symphony No. 1 for 10 Strings (1985-6)

Jaroslav Vodnansky/South Bohemian String Orchestra
( + Macha: Eirene and Zahradník: 2 Monologues of Julia)
PANTON 81 0844 (LP) (1988)




ALEKSANDAR OBRADOVIĆ
(1927-2001, SERBIAN)

Born in Bled. He studied composition with Mihovil Logar at the Belgrade Academy. He first taught at at the Stankovič Music School in Belgrade before becoming a lecturer and then professor at the Belgrade Academy. Afterwards, he studied in London with Lennox Berkeley and at the Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center. He composed orchestral, chamber, instrumental, vocal and electronic works. His unrecorded Symphonies are: Nos. 1 (1952), 4 (1974), 6 "Explicatio Duplex, Expressio Triplex" (1977), 7 (1985) and 8 for for 2 Voices, Chorus and Orchestra "In Childhood's Bygone Meadow" (1989).

Symphony No. 2 (1959-61)

Mladen Jagust/Belgrade Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 3 and 5, Cello Concerto and Clarinet Concerto)
RTB 3130061 (2 LPs) (1970s)

Symphony No. 3 for Orchestra and Tape "Microsymphony" (1967)

Samo Hubad/Ljubljana Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 2 and 5, Cello Concerto and Clarinet Concerto)
RTB 3130061 (2 LPs) (1970s)

Symphony No. 5 (1973)

Mladen Jagust/Belgrade Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 2 and 3, Cello Concerto and Clarinet Concerto)
RTB 3130061 (2 LPs) (1970s)




ANDREJ OČENÁŠ
(1911-1995, SLOVAK)

Born in Selce. He studied at the Music and Drama Academy in Bratislava with Alexander Moyzes for composition and Josef Vincourek for conducting and continued his studies at the master classes of the Prague Conservatory with Vitězslav Novák. After World War II, he worked in the music department of the Bratislava Radio for Slovakia and became deputy programme director of the Czechoslovak Radio. He taught composition and became director of the Conservatory in Bratislava. His catalogue encompasses most genres from opera and ballet to works for solo instruments. His orchestral output includes a Sinfonietta, Op. 35
(1966).

Symphony of Earth and Man for Chorus and Orchestra, Op. 43 (1970)

Ladislav Slovák/Slovak Philharmonic Chorus/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
OPUS 9110 0205 (LP) (1971)



KRSTO ODAK
(1888-1965, CROATIAN)

Born in Siverič, near Drniš. After some private music lessons, he joined the Franciscan Order. He then went to Munich to study theology but also studied composition and organ with Pater Hartmann. Having left the Order, he went to Prague to study there at the Conservatory with Vitězslav Novák. He composed prolifically, producing over 200 works in various genres from opera to chamber works. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 1, Op. 36 "Simfonija Jadrana" (Adriatic) (1940), Symphony No. 2, Op. 52 "Sinfonia Brevis" (1951) and 4 (1965).

Symphony No. 3, Op. 72 (1961)

Nikša Bareza/Croatia Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Josipovic: Samba da Camera and S. Horvat: The Murmur of Wings, the Murmur of Water)
CROATIAN COMPOSERS' SOCIETY IFPI L554 (1998)
(original LP release: CROATIAN COMPOSERS' SOCIETY 0101 24)

Milan Horvat/Zagreb Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Suite No. 2 for Strings, Passacaglia for Strings and Violin Sonata)
CANTUS 989 052 0887-2 (2009)




TIBERIU OLAH
(1928-2002, ROMANIAN)

(b Arpăşel, Maramureş District. He studied theory At the Dima Conservatory, Cluj with Juliu Mureşianu, harmony and counterpoint with Max Eisikovits and the piano with Gheorghe Halmos. Then he continued his studies at the Moscow Conservatory under Yevgeny O. Messner for composition and Dmitri Rogal-Levitsky for orchestration and also participated in the Darmstadt, Germany summer courses. He taught at the Bucharest Conservatory. His catalogue includes a television opera, many film scores as well as orchestral, chamber, instrumental, vocal and choral works. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 1 (1956),and 2 ( and the choral symphony "Timpul Cerbilor" (The Time of the Stags) (1973).

Symphony No. 3 (1989)

Horia Andreescu/Romanian Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
(included in collection: "Rumanian Anthology"
ATTACCA BABEL 9264-66 (3 CDs) (1992)

Symphony No. 4 "Sinfonia Giocosa" (1991)

Horia Andreescu/Romanian National Radio Orchestra
( + Niculescu: Symphony No. 4, Vieru: Memorial and Marbe: Serenade)
ROMANIAN MINISTRY OF CULTURE EDITURAMUZICALA 004 2000)ROMANIAN MINISTRY OF CULTURE EDITURA MUZICALA 004 (2000)


OTAKAR OSTRČIL
(1879-1935, CZECH)

Born in Smichov, near Prague. Trained academically in modern languages, he studied music privately, taking piano lessons with Adolf Mikeš and then Zděnek Fibich, with whom he also studied composition and became his amanuensis. His career began as a conductor of various orchestras and he then joined the staff of the National Theatre as dramaturg in 1919 and became its musical director. In addition, he taught conducting at the Prague Conservatory. He composed operas, orchestral, chamber and vocal works.

Symphony in A major, Op. 7 (1905)


Jiří Bělohlávek/Prague Symphony Orchestra
( + Sinfonietta)
SUPRAPHON 11 1826-2 (1994)
(original LP release: SUPRAPHON 1110 2960) (1982)

Symfonietta, Op. 20 (1921)

Jiří Bělohlávek/Prague Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony in A)
SUPRAPHON 11 1826-2 (1994)
(original LP release: SUPRAPHON 1110 3638) (1985)




PETAR OZGIJAN
(1932-1979, SERBIAN)

Born in Dubrovnik, Croatia. He completed composition studies at the Belgrade Academy under Stanojlo Rajičić in 1959, with further studies until 1964, including conducting with Predrag Milošević. He taufgt at the Slavenski Music School in Belgrade and was a lecturer at the Belgrade Music Academy. He composed orchestral, chamber and vocal works. His earlier Symphonies are: (Nos. 1) "Simfonietta for Strings" (1960) and 2 (1967).

Symphony (No. 3) "Symphony '75" (1975)


Mladen Jagust/Belgrade Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Colic: Prelidijum, Fuga and Postludijum)
RTB 2521 (LP) (1970s)




TADEUSZ PACIORKIEWICZ
(1916-1998, POLISH)

Born in Sierpc. He studied the organ with Bronisłav Rutkowski in Warsaw and after World War II he was a composition pupil of Kazimierz Sikorski at the Łódż State College of Music. He then taught at the Conservatories of Łódż and Warsaw. He was also active as an organist and choral conductor. He composed orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 1 (1953), 3 (1989) and 4 (1992).

Symphony No. 2 (1957)

Karol Stryja/Moscow Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Lutos·awski: Silesian Triptych, Kisełewski: Concerto for Chamber Orchestra, Bacewicz: Music for Strings, 5 Trumpets and Percussion and Rudzinski: Concert Music for Piano and Orchestra)
MELODIYA D 013193-6 (2 LPs) (1964)




IGNACY JAN PADEREWSKI
(1860-1941, POLISH)

Born in Kuryłówska, Podolia. At an early age he took lessons with Piotr Sowinski and had later piano and composition studies at the Warsaw Conservatory, but he was mostly self-taught. He had a brilliant international career as a pianist and was an important political leader as well. He composed an opera, a few orchestral works as well as many piano pieces and songs.

Symphony in B minor, Op. 24 "Polonia" (1903, rev.1907-8)

Jerzy Maksymiuk /BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra
HYPERION HELIOS CDH55351 (2010)
(original CD release: HYPERION CDA67056) (1998)

Bohdan Wodiczko/Pomeranian Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra, Bydgoscz
( + Polish Fantasy)
OLYMPIA OCD 305 (1988)
(original LP release: MUZA SXL 0968 (1964)

 

DOMENIKOS PADOVAS I PADOVANIS
(1817-1892, GREEK)

Born in Corfu. His actual name was Domenico Padovani. He first took lessons with Nikolaos Mantzaros and finished his musical studies with a degree in Rome. Back in Corfu, he entered the Conservatory of the Philharmonic Society of Corfu , where he worked as a teacher and succeeded Mantzaros as musical director. He was also organist at the Catholic cathedral. He wrote several works for the musical theater including an opera as well as other vocal works and Italian-style symphonies.

Sinfonia a Piena Orchestra

Symeon Kogan/Volos Symphony Orchestra
(included in collection: "Cultural Olympiad)
HELLENIC MINISTRY OF CULTURE 0001-2 (12 CDs) (2003)

 

JOSEF PALENIČEK
(1914–1991, CZECH)


Born in Travnik, Bosnia. A pianist debuting at age 12, he studied music at the Prague Conservatory while simultaneously studying law. He became a pupil of Vitězslav Novák and finished his studies in Paris, with, among others, Albert Roussel. After 1963, he taught at the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague. His 3 piano concertos are his main compositions.

Sinfonietta for Strings (1975)


Josef Vlach/Suk Chamber Orchestra
( + Klusak: Partita and Lukaš: Concerto Grosso I)
PANTON 81 0777 (LP) (1988)



ROMAN PALESTER
(1907-1989, POLISH)

Born in Sniatyn, (now Snyatyn, Ukraine). He began his piano studies as a child and continued them at the Music Institute in Kraków and then at the conservatory in Lwów and later studied music theory and composition at the Warsaw Conservatory with Kazimierz Sikorski. He became a professor of composition at the State Higher School for Music (now the Academy of Music, Kraków) but left Poland after World War II and settled in Paris. He composed in all genres, including orchestral, chamber, vocal and stage works. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 1 (1935, lost), 2 (1941–2), 3 for 2 String Orchestras (1948–9) and 4 (1948–52, rev. 1972) as well as Sinfonietta for Chamber Orchestra (1948, rev. 1984).

Symphony No. 5 (1977-81)

Jan Krenz/Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra, Katowice
MUZA SX 2738 (WARSAW AUTUMN non-commercial LP) (1988)




PAVEL PALKOVSKÝ
(b.1939, CZECH)

Born in Zlín, son of the composer Oldŕich Palkovský (1907-1983). He studied composition with Theodor Schaefer at the Brno Conservatory and with Jan Kapr at the Janáček Academy of Music in that same city. He has composed orchestral and chamber works. His Symphony No. 1 is from 1961.

Symphony No. 2 for Piano and Orchestra (1968-9)

Josef Blacky/Pilsen Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Chaun: Hommage à Dubuffet and Šrom: Études)
SUPRAPHON 1191055 (LP) (1971)


ALKIS PANAYOTOPOULOS
(b.1950, GREEK)

Born in Athens. He studied harmony, counterpoint and fugue withYiannis Papaioannou, conducting with Hans Swarowsky in Vienna and Pierre Dervaux in Paris and Harold Genzmer and composition with Harold Genzmer in Munich. He has pursued a conducting career in Greece and abroad and became principal conductor of the Symphony Orchestra of Bulgaria. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 1 (1975), 2 "Goetz von Berlichingen" (1978), 3 "Josef K" (1981), 4 "Oswolt Krel" (1991), 7 "Houses at Night" (2000), 8 (2002), 9 "Vers le Soleil" (2007) and 10 "Allydis" (2007)
as well as a Sinfonietta (1973).

Symphony No. 5 "The Scream of the Full Moon" (1998)

Alkis Panayotopoulos/Bulgarian National Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 6, Moby Dick and Heroic Scenes)
LEGEND CLASSICS 2202260822 (2003)
( + Logothetis: Kollisionen, Konitopoulos: Speos, Filaktos: Aleatoric Sketches andSicilianos: Landscapes)
MEGA MUSIC1999 DDD MK 6293 (1999)/LYRA CD 1042 (2004)

Symphony No. 6 "Apparition" (2000)

Alkis Panayotopoulos/Bulgarian National Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 5, Moby Dick and Heroic Scenes)
LEGEND CLASSICS 2202260822 (2003)




ANDRZEJ PANUFNIK
(1914-1991, POLISH > UK)

Born in Warsaw. He studied composition at the Warsaw Conservatory with Kazimierz Sikorski, conducting with Felix Weingartner at the Vienna Academy of Music and had further lessons with Philippe Gaubert in Paris. He had a successful conducting career in Poland after 1939 until his emigration to England in 1954. He continued to conduct but was eventually able to devote himself entirely to composing. From his days in Poland he composed prolifically but most of his early works (including 2 Symphonies) were lost during the Warsaw Uprising in 1944. His other major orchestral works are Concertos for Piano, Violin, Cello and Bassoon and Arbor Cosmica.

Symphony No. 1 "Sinfonia Rustica" (1948)

Łukasz Borowicz/Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 4, Polonia Suite and Lullaby)
CPO 777496-2 (2010)

Andrzej Panufnik/Monte Carlo Opera Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 3 and 4)
EMI BRITISH COMPOSERS CD 352289-2 (2006)
(original LP release: HMV ASD 2298) (1967)


Symphony No. 2 "Sinfonia Elegiaca" (1957)

Łukasz Borowicz/Konzerthausorchester Berlin
( + Symphonies Nos. 3 and 10)
CPO 777683-2 (2011)

Robert Whitney/Louisville Orchestra
( + Nocturne and Rhapsody for Orchestra)
FIRST EDITION FECD 0017 (2003)
(original LP release: LOUISVILLE 624 (1962)


Symphony No. 3 "Sinfonia Sacra" (1963)

Łukasz Borowicz/Konzerthausorchester Berlin
( + Symphonies Nos. 2 and 10)
CPO 777683-2 (2011)

Kazimierz Kord/Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 10 and Cello Concerto {Andrzej Bauer - cello})
CD ACCORD ACD072 (2002

Andrzej Panufnik/Monte Carlo Opera Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1 and 4)
EMI BRITISH COMPOSERS CD 352289-2 (2006)
(original LP release: HMV ASD 2298) (1967)

Andrzej Panufnik/Monte Carlo Opera Orchestra
( + Concertino for Timpani, Percussion and Strings, Concerto Festivo, Katyn Epitaph and Landscape)
UNICORN-KAMCHANA UKCD 2020 (1989)
(original LP release: HMV ASD 2298 (1967)

Andrzej Panufnik/Concertgebouw Orchestra
( + Arbor Cosmica)
NONESUCH 79228-2 (1991)

John Storgards/Tampere Philharmonic
( + Symphony No. 5, Landscape and Heroic Overture)
ONDINE ODE11015 (2007)


Symphony No. 4 "Sinfonia Concertante" (1973)

Łukasz Borowicz/Anna Sikorzak-Olek (harp)/Łukasz Długosz(flute)/Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 1, Polonia Suite and Lullaby)
CPO 777496-2 (2010)

Andrzej Panufnik/Aurele Nicolet (flute), Ossian Ellis (harp)/Menuhin Festival Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1 and 3)
EMI BRITISH COMPOSERS CD 352289-2 (2006)
(original LP release: EMI EMD 5525) (1975)

Mark Stephenson/Karen Jones (flute), Rachel Masters (harp)/London Musici
( + Harmony and Concertino for Timpani, Percussion and Strings)
CONIFER CDCF 217 (1994)


Symphony No. 5 "Sinfonia di Sfere" (1974-5)

David Atherton/London Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 6)
EXPLORE RECORDS EXP 0014
(original LP release: DECCA HEADLINE HEAD 22) (1979)

Łukasz Borowicz/Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Bassoon Concerto; Love Song and Landscape)
CPO 777 686-2 (2014)

John Storgards/Tampere Philharmonic
( + Symphony No. 3, Landscape and Heroic Overture)
ONDINE ODE11015 (2007)


Symphony No. 6 "Sinfonia Mistica" (1977)

David Atherton/London Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 5)
EXPLORE RECORDS EXP 0014
(original LP release: DECCA HEADLINE HEAD 22) (1979)

Łukasz Borowicz/Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Autumn Music, Rhapsody and Hommage à Chopin)
CPO 777498-2 (2011)

Tadeusz Strugala/Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Krupowicz: Only Beatrice and Augusty: Sub Love)
MUZA 2854 (Warsaw Autumn 1989 No. 2) (LP) (1989)


Symphony No. 7 "Metasinfonia" (1978)

Łukasz Borowicz/Konzerthausorchester Berlin
( + Symphony No. 8 and Concerto Festivo)
CPO 777684-2 (2012)

Andrzej Panufnik/Jennifer Bate (organ)/Kurt Hans Goedike (timpani)/London Symphony Orchestra
( + Universal Prayer)
UNICORN DKP 9049 (LP) (1980)


Symphony No. 8 "Sinfonia Votiva" (1981)

Łukasz Borowicz/Konzerthausorchester Berlin
( + Symphony No. 7 and Concerto Festivo)
CPO 777684-2 (2012)

Norman Del Mar/BBC Symphony Orchestra (rec. 1983)
( + Szymanowski: Symphonies Nos. 3 and 4)
CARLTON BBC RADIO CLASSICS IMP 9124 (1995)

Seiji Ozawa/Boston Symphony Orchestra
( + Roger Sessions: Concerto for Orchestra)
HYPERION HELIOS CDH55100 (2002)
(original LP release: HYPERION CDA 66050) (1982)


Symphony No. 9 "Sinfonia della Speranza" (1986)

Łukasz Borowicz/Konzerthausorchester Berlin
( + Concertino for Timpani, Percussion and String Orchestra)
CPO 777685-2 (2013)

Jacek Kasprzyk/Cracow Philharmonic Orchestra
MUZA SX 2576 (non-commercial 1987 WARSAW AUTUMN LP) (1987)

Andzej Panufnik/BBC Symphony Orchestra (rec. 1987)
( + Bassoon Concerto)
HERITAGE HTGCD2 (2014)

Andrzej Panufnik/London Symphony Orchestra
( + Piano Concerto)
CATALYST 64280 (2005)
(original CD release: CONIFER CDCF 206) (1992)


Symphony No. 10 (1989)

Łukasz Borowicz/Konzerthausorchester Berlin
( + Symphonies Nos. 2 and 3)
CPO 777683-2 (2011)

Kazimierz Kord/Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 3 and Cello Concerto {Andrzej Bauer - cello})
CD ACCORD ACD072 (2002)

Gerard Schwartz/Seattle Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 3, Autumn Music and Heroic Overture)
JVC CLASSICS JVCC 6511-2 (1998)




YANNIS ANDREOU PAPAIOANNOU
(1910-1989, GREEK)

Born in Kavala. He studied the piano with Marika Laspopoulou and composition with Alekos Kontis at the Hellenic Conservatory, Athens as well as the piano and orchestration with Riadis in Thessalonica, but considered himself essentially self-taught. In addition, he took some composition lessons from Arthur Honneger in Paris. He taught at the Hellenic Conservatory. He composed a fairly substantial catalogue of orchestral, chamber, piano and vocal works. His other Symphonies are: Nos 1 (1946), 2 (1947), 4 (1963) and 5 (1964).

Symphony #3 (1953)

Miltos Logiades/Orchestra of Colours
(included in collection: "Cultural Olympiad)
HELLENIC MINISTRY OF CULTURE 0001-2 (12 CDs) (2003)




BORIS PAPANDOPULO
(1906-1991, CROATIA)

Born in Honnef am Rhein, Germany. He studied composition with Blagoje Bersa at the Zagreb Academy of Music and conducting with Alfred Fock at the New Vienna Conservatory. He then worked as an orchestral, operatic and choral conductor mostly in Zagreb where he led the Zagreb Opera and the Zagreb Radio Orchestra and also published music criticism. He composed operas, ballets, orchestral, chamber and vocal works. His other Symphonies are: Nos.1 (1930) and 2 (1946) and Sinfonia Brevis (1984).

Sinfonietta for String Orchestra, Op. 79 (1938)

Mladen Bašić/Zagreb Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Piano Concerto No. 2 - Rondo)
JUGOTON ULPSV-25 (LP) (1973)

Antonio Janigro/Zagreb Radio Chamber Orchestra
( + Lisinski: Evening, Bersa:Sunny Fields and Gotovac: Symphonic Kolo)
CROATIA RECORDS CD-S-1-VL5039525 (1993)
(original LP release: JUGOTON LPY 23) (1950s)

Lovro von Matačić/Zagreb Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1971)
( + Detoni: Elucubrations and Kelemen: Changeant)
ZAGREB PHILHARMONIC CD 37598 (1999)



FRANO PARAC
(b. 1948, CROATIAN)

Born in Split. He studied with Milan Horvat at the Academy of Music in Zagreb. After 1978, he taught at the Academy. His catalogue includes just this one symphony.

Symphony (1993)

Niksa Bareza/Symphonic Orchestra of the Croatian Radio and TV
( +Violin Concerto, Sarabande, and Serenade)
CROATIAN COMPOSERS' SOCIETY CD 2008 (1993)


JIŘÍ PAUER
(1919-2007, CZECH)

Born Libušín, near Kladno. He first studied composition privately with Otakar Šín, and then with Alois Hába at the Prague Conservatory as well as with Pavel Bořkovec at the Academy of Musical Arts . An important musical administrator and teacher, he was principal of opera at the Prague National Theatre, director of the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, professor of composition at the Academy of Musical Arts and general manager of the Prague National Theatre. He composed operas, ballets, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. He also composed a Symphony for Orchertra (1962–4).

Symphony for Strings (1978)

Josef Vlach/Czech Chamber Orchestra
( + Dobiaš: Prague the One and Only, Seidel: Message to the Living and Trojan: Spaliček-Suite)
PANTON 81100350-1 (2 LPs) (c. 1980)


DORA PEJAČEVIĆ
(1885-1923, CROATIAN)

Born in Budapest. She began to compose when she was 12. She studied music privately in Zagreb, Dresden and Munich and also received lessons in instrumentation from Dragutin Kaiser and Walter Courvoisier, and composition from Percy Sherwood). However, she was largely self-taught in composition. Despite her early death, she managed to compose a catalogue of 58 compositions, mostly in late-Romantic style, ranging from songs, piano works, chamber music, and several compositions for large orchestra.

Symphony in F sharp minor, Op. 41 (1916-20)

Ari Rasilainen/Rheinland-Pfalz State Philharmonic
( + Phantasie Concertante for Piano and Orchestra)
CPO 777418-2 (2011)


MICHAIL PEKOV
(b.1941, BULGARIAN)

Born in Vidin. He graduated from the Sofia State Academy of Music having studied composition with Vesselin Stoyanov. He had post-graduate studies in Leningrad with Vadim Salmanov and with Emil Petrovics in Budapest. He worked at the Sofia Philharmonic and at the Music State Agency before joining the Faculty of the State Academy of Music where he taught harmony and composition. He composed an opera, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. He composed 10 numbered Symphonies: Nos. 1 (1963), 2 (1974), 3 (1975), 4 (1977), 5 (1983), 6 (1986), 7 (1988), 8 (1993), 9 (1998) and 10 (2000).

Symphony for Strings (No. ?)

Kamen Goleminov/Bulgarian Radio Opera Symphony Orchestra
( + S. Ikonomov|: Music for 2 Pianos and Percussion)
BALKANTON BCA 19507 (LP) (c. 1990)




KRZYSZTOF PENDERECKI
(b.1933, POLISH)

Born in Dębica. He studied composition privately with Franciszek Skolyszewski and then with Artur Malawski and Stanisław Wiechowicz at the State Higher School of Music (now the Academy) in Kraków. On graduating, he joined the staff of that institution as a teacher of composition. In addition, he was a lecturer at the Volkwang Hochschule für Musik in Essen, and was appointed rector of the Kraków Conservatory. He became world famous as a leading composer of the avant-garde and accepted many composition residencies in Europe and America.and conducted his music on various tours. He composed prolifically in many genres including operas, orchestra, chamber, choral and vocal works. His Symphony No. 6 has not as yet been completed.

Symphony No. 1 (1972-3)

Krzysztof Penderecki/London Symphony Orchestra
( + Anaklasis, Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima, Fonogrammi, De Natura Sonoris Nos. 1 and 2, Capriccio for Violin and Orchestra, Canticum Canticorum Salomonis, The Dream of Jacob, Emanations for Two String Orchestras, Partita for Harpsichord and Chamber Orchestra and Cello Concerto No. 1)
EMI GEMINI 381508-2 (2 CDs) (2007)
(original LP release: EMI EMD 5507) (1973)

Krzysztof Penderecki/Polish Sinfonia Iuventus Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2)
DUX DUX0897 (2013)

Antoni Wit/Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Katowice
( + Symphony No. 5)
NAXOS 8.554567 (2000)


Symphony No. 2 "Christmas" (1979-80)

Wojciech Czepiel/Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra and Choir, Kraków
( + Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima, Anaklasis and Passacaglia and Rondo)
DUX DUX0475 (2005)

Jacek Kasprzyk/Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra
(+ Bruzdowicz: Double Bass Concerto)
OLYMPIA OCD 329 (1989)
(original LP release: MUZA SX 2310/PAVANE ADW 7100) (1981)

Krzysztof Penderecki/Polish Sinfonia Iuventus Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 1)
DUX DUX0897 (2013)

Krzysztof Penderecki/Leningrad Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Viola Concerto)
MELODIYA S10 23281 (LP) (1983)

Krzysztof Penderecki/Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Kraków
( + Magnificat, Te Deum, Lacrimosa and Kanon)
EMI GEMINI 217669-2(2 CDs) (2007)
(original LP release: EMI 067 2700411) (1984)

Antoni Wit/Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Katowice
( + Symphony No. 4)
NAXOS 8.554492 (2000)


Symphony No. 3 (1988-95)

Krzysztof Penderecki/Polish Sinfonia Iuventus Orchestra
DUX DUX0898 (2013)

Antoni Wit/Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Katowice
( + Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima, Fluorescences and De Natura Sonoris No. 2)
NAXOS 8.554491 (2000)


Symphony No. 4 "Adagio" (1989)

Krzysztof Penderecki/Polish Sinfonia Iuventus Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 5)
DUX DUX0899 (2013)
(original CD release: DUX 0822 (2011)

Antoni Wit/Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Katowice
( + Symphony No. 2)
NAXOS 8.554492 (2000)


Symphony No. 5 "Korean" (1992)

Krzysztof Penderecki/Polish Sinfonia Iuventus Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 4)
DUX DUX0899 (2013)

Antoni Wit/Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Katowice
( + Symphony No. 1)
NAXOS 8.554567 (2000)


Symphony No. 7 for Soloists, Chorus and Orchestra "Seven Gates of Jerusalem" (1995-6)

Kazimierz Kord/Bozena Harasimowicz Hass (soprano)/Izabela Kłosinska (soprano)/Ewa Podles (contralto)/Wiesław Ochman (tenor)/ Romuald Tesarowicz (bass)/Gustaw Holoubek (spoken vocals)/Warsaw Philharmonic Choir/Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra
WERGO WER66472 (2000)
(original CD release: CD ACCORD ACD036) (1997)

Krzysztof Penderecki/Marta Olga Mularczyk (soprano)/Izabella Matula (soprano)/ Maria Lenart (alto)/Pawel Fundment (tenor)/Leszek Solarski (bass)/Jerzy Trela (spoken vocals)/Krakow Academy of Music Symphonic Chorus/Krakow Academy of Music Symphonic Orchestra
DUX RECORDS DUX0546 (2008)

Krzysztof Penderecki/Iwona Hossa (soprano)/Izabela Klosinska (soprano)/Agnieszka Rehlis (alto)/Rafal Bartminski (tenor)/Wojciech Gierlach (bass)/Slawomir Holland (spoken vocals)/Opera Choir of the Bialystok Podlasie Philharmonic Orchestra/Polish Sinfonia Iuventus Orchestra
DUX RECORDS DUX0900 (2013)

Antoni Wit/Aga Mikolaj (soprano)/Olga Pasichnyk (soprano)/ Ewa Marciniec (alto)/Wieslaw Ochman (tenor)/Romuald Tesarowicz (bass)/Boris Carmeli (spoken vocals)/Warsaw National Philharmonic Choir/Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra
NAXOS 8.557766 (2006)

Symphony No. 8 for Soloists, Chorus and Orchestra "Lieder Vergänglichkeit" (2005)

Krzysztof Penderecki/Iwona Hossa (soprano)/Agnieszka Rehlis(alto)/Thomas E. Bauer (baritone)/Opera Choir of the Bialystok Podlasie Philharmonic Orchestra/Polish Sinfonia Iuventus Orchestra
DUX RECORDS DUX0901 (2013)

Antoni Wit/Michaela Kaune (soprano)/Agnieszka Rehlis (mezzo)/Wojciech Drabowicz (baritone)/Warsaw National Philharmonic Choir/Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Dies Irae and Psalm of David)
NAXOS 8.570450 (2008)


Sinfonietta No. 1 for String Orchestra (orchestration of String Trio) (1990-1/1992)

Robert Kabara/Dorota Imietowska (cello)/E. Szczepanska (viola)/Robert Kabara (violin)/Krakow Chamber Players
( + Husa: Music for Prague 1968, Perron: Séquences Voilées, Van De Vate: Viola Concerto and F. Weiss: Relazioni Variabili)
VIENNA MODERN MASTERS 3023 (1998)

Krzysztof Penderecki/Christoph Poppen (violin)/Kim Kashkashian (viola)/Boris Pergamenschikow (cello)/ Sinfonia Varsovia
( + Serenade for string orchestra, Intermezzo for 24 Strings, Paradise Lost: Adagietto, Chaconne, Requiem: Agnus Dei, 3 Pieces in Baroque Style and Seven Gates of Jerusalem: De Profundis)
DUX DUX0678 (2009)
(original CD release: SONY CLASSICS SK 66284) (1995)

Antoni Wit/Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Sinfonietta No. 2, Three Pieces in Old Style. Serenade, Intermezzo for 24 Strings and Capriccio for Oboe and String Orchestra)
NAXOS 8.572212 (2012)

Maciej Zoltowski/Radom Chamber Orchestra
( + Sinfonietta No. 2, Serenade for String Orchestra and Viola Concerto)
DUX RECORDS DUX0935 (2013)


Sinfonietta No. 2 for Flute/Clarinet and String Orchestra (1994)

Krysztof Penderecki/Sharon Kam (clarinet)/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
(included in collection: "Sharon Kam - Collected Recordings")
TELDEC 2564696734 (5 CDs) (2008)
(original CD release: SONY CLASSICS SK 66284) (1995)

Antoni Wit/Artur Pachlewski (clarinet)/Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Sinfonietta No. 1, Three Pieces in Old Style. Serenade, Intermezzo for 24 Strings and Capriccio for Oboe and String Orchestra)
NAXOS 8.572212 (2012)

Maciej Zoltowski/Lukasz Dlugosz (flute)/Radom Chamber Orchestra
( + Sinfonietta No. 1, Serenade for String Orchestra and Viola Concerto)
DUX RECORDS DUX0935 (2013)



ZBIGNIEW PENHERSKI
(b. 1935, POLAND)

Born in Warsaw. He studied composition with Bolesław Poradowski at the State Academy of Music in Poznan followed by studies with Tadeusz Szeligowski in Warsaw. He also studied conducting under Bohdan Wodiczko before going on for further studies at the Institute of Sonology at the University of Utrecht. His work consists predominantly of orchestral and chamber music as well as radio works and operas.

Little 'Autumn' Symphony (2006)

Peter Hirsch/Sinfonia Varsovia
( + Baginski: Circulations, N. Huber: Herbstfestival, Walter: Luftspiegelung, and Zawadzka-Golosz: Suite of Space)
WARSAW AUTUMN 2006-CD No. 5, POLMIC 023 (non-commercial) (2007)



PIOTR PERKOWSKI
(1901-1990, POLISH)

Born in Oweczacze (now in Ukraine). He studied composition with Roman Statkowski at the Warsaw Conservatory as well as privately with Karol Szymanowski and continued his studies in Paris with Albert Roussel. On his return to Poland in 1930 he was appointed director of the Friends of Symphonic Music Society in Warsaas well as vice-president of the International Society for Contemporary Music, Polish Section. After World War II, he was appointed director of the Music Department in the Ministry of Culture and also held other academic and administrative positions. His large catalogue includes an opera, ballets, orchestral, chamber, instrumental, choral and vocal works. Among these are Symphony No. 1 for Soloists, Choir, Organ and Orchestra (1925), Symphony No. 2 (1952-5), Sinfonia Drammatica (1963) and Symphony (1981).

Sinfonietta, Op. 17 (1927)

Janusz Przybylski/Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra, Katowice
( Violin Concerto No. 2, Cello Concerto and Nocturne)
POLSKIE RADIO PRCD 138 (2001)



HARILAOS PERPESSAS
(1907-1995, GREEK > USA)

Born in Leipzig. He was a pupil of Schoenberg in Berlin where he met Nikos Skalkottas. He spent more than a decade in Greece but emigrated to America where he remained for the remainder of his life. He composed orchestral, instrumental and choral works. His Symphony No. 1 is probably a 3 movement orchestral piece from 1934.

"Christus" Symphony (originally Symphony No.2, c.1936-7/1948-50)

Dimitri Mitropoulos/New York Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra (rec. 1950)
( + Mahler: Symphony No. 3)
DISCANTUS 189.609/10-2 (2 CDs) (1997)




NIKOLA PETIN
(1920-2004, SERBIAN)

Born in Belgrade. His musical studies began in the piano department of the Music Academy in Belgrade and then he studied composition there with Miloje Milojević, Marjan Kozina and Josip Slavenski. He was a was professor of theory subjects at the Secondary School of Music in Novi Sad, and later professor of the Academy of Art in Novi Sad. He composed orchestral, solo-instrumental and vocal works. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 1 "Classical Symphony - Amadeus", 2 "Symphony Brevis" (1958) and 4 "Horoscope Symphony" for Mixed Choir, Soprano, Reciters and Orchestra (1986).

Symphony No. 3 "Baroque Symphony" (1964)

Milan Horvat/Zagreb Philharmonic Orchestra
(+ The Man and the Hill)
JUGOTON ULS 526 (LP)




IVO PETRIĆ
(b.1931, SLOVENE)

Born in Ljubljana. At the Ljubljana Academy of Music, he studied harmony with Jurij Gregorc and began to write compositions for actual performance. He then studied composition, conducting and oboe and became a member of the new Radio Symphony Orchestra as an oboe and cor anglais player. He studied further at the Ljubljana Academy with Danilo Švara for conducting and Lucijan Škerjanc for composition. The list of his compositions includes orchestral, chamber and solo works. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 3 (1960), Autumn Symphony (1996) and Sinfonietta Giocosa for String Orchestra (2007).

Symphony No. 1 "Symphony Goga" (1954-60)


Marko Munih/Slovenian Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2 and Concerto Grosso)
RADIO SLOVENIA SIP 01 SAZAS (1998)

Symphony No. 2 (1957)

Marko Munih/Slovenian Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 1 and Concerto Grosso)
RADIO SLOVENIA SIP 01 SAZAS (1998)




PETROS PETRIDIS
(1892-1977, GREEK)

Born in Nigde, Turkey. His musical education began in Istanbul where he studied the piano. While studying law at the Sorbonne, he met the Greek composers Emilios Riadis, Marios Varvoglis and Theodoros Spathis and decided to have a career in music. In Paris, he had some studies with Albert Wolff and Albert Roussel, but considered himself self-taught as a composer. He worked as a music critic and lecturer on Greek culture. He composed operas, orchestral, chamber and vocal works. His unrecorded Symphonies are: Nos. 2 in D minor and A minor "Lyric" (1941), 3 in D "Parisian" (1944-6) and 5 in F "Pastoral" (1949-51, rev.1972-3). There is also a Chamber Symphony for Wind Quartet and String Quartet (before 1932).

Symphony No. 1 in G minor "Hellenic" (1928-9)

Byron Fidetzis/Bulgarian Radio andTelevision_Symphony Orchestra
( + Kleft Dances and Kalomiris: Magic Herbs Magic)
LYRA CD 0060 (2003)
(original LP release: GREEK DISCOGRAPHY 91009) (1986)


Symphony No. 4 in C minor "Doric" (1944-6)

Byron Fidetzis/Greek Radio National Symphony Orchestra
(included in collection: "Cultural Olympiad)
HELLENIC MINISTRY OF CULTURE 0001-2 (12 CDs) (2003)




RADOMIR PETROVIĆ
(1923-1991, SERBIAN)

Born in Belgrade. He studied music with Predrag Milošević at the Belgrade Music Academy He was a teacher of theory at the Josep Slavenski Music School in Belgrade and then lecturer in harmony and counterpoint at the Belgrade Faculty of Musical Arts and also worked as a choral conductor. He composed orchestral and chamber music but specialized in choral works.

Symphony (1972)

Anton Nanut/Slovene Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Concerto in Modo Antica and Carmina Iuventatis)
RTB 213081 (LP) (1981)




VILÉM PETRŽELKA
(1889-1967, CZECH)

Born in Brno. He studied at the Brno Organ School with Leoš Janáček and privately in Prague with Vitězslav Novák. He lectured in composition and theory at the Brno Conservatory and then at the Academy where he became a professor. He also worked as a music critic for newspapers in Ostrava and Brno. He composed operas, orchestral, chamber, vocal and choral works. His Symphony in 3 Movements, Op.13 "The Eternal Return (1922-3) and Symphony, Op. 56 (1955-6) have not been recorded.

Sinfonietta, Op. 38 (1941)

Miloš Konvalinka/Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Chlubna: Comedy Overture, Kvapil: Symphonic Variations and Kaprál: Lullabies)
PANTON 8110 0003 (LP) (1980)


Pastoral Sinfonietta, Op. 51 (1951)

Břestislav Bakala/Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Hlobil: Summer in the Giant Mountains)
SUPRAPHON DV 5439 (LP) (1950s)

 

VANGELIS PETSALIS
(b.1965, GREEK)

Born in Corfu in 1965. He took his piano lessons at the Conservatory of the Philharmonic Society of Corfu. He completed his studies in orchestration and composition in Athens with J. Papadatos. He has composed orchestral, piano and choral works as well music for the theater.

Symphony No. 1 (1995)

Alkis Panayotopoulos/Bulgarian National Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Adagio and Fugue for Strings and 9 Piano Preludes)
AGORA AG 072.1 (1996)

Symphony No. 2 (2005)

Alkis Panayotopoulos/Bulgarian National Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Samaras: Elegy for Clarinet, Percussion and Strings, Kanas: Zachlorou Project No. 19 and Karousas: Elegy for Alkistis)
LEGEND CLASSICS - MODERN TIMES (2009)


LUBOMIR PIPKOV
(1904-1974, BULGARIAN)

Born in Lovech. He studied at the Sofia State Music Academy and then in Paris at the Ecole Normale with Paul Dukas for composition, Yvonne Léfébure (piano) and Nadia Boulanger for music history. Back in Sofia, he worked at the National Opera, first as répétiteur, then as chorus master and finally as director and was appointed professor of vocal ensemble and opera at the Sofia State Academy. He composed operas, orchestral, chamber, instrumental, vocal and choral works as well as film scores and incidental music. He also composed a Symphony-Concerto for Cello and Orchestra, Op. 56 (1953-63).

Symphony No. 1, Op. 22 (1937-40)

Konstantin Iliev/Sofia State Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 4)
BALKANTON BCA 1212 (LP) (1960s)


Symphony No. 2, Op. 47 (1953-5)

Konstantin Iliev/Sofia State Philharmonic Orchestra
BALKANTON 121 (LP) (1960s)


Symphony No. 3, Op. 65 for Trumpet, Strings, Percussion and 2 Pianos (1965)

Konstantin Iliev/Sofia State Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Kazandjiev: Concerto for Piano, Saxophone and Orchestra)
BALKANTON BCA 505 (LP) (1960s)

Dimiter Manolov/Sofia State Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Revolutionary Symphony)
BALKANTON BCA 1305 (LP) (1970s)


Symphony No. 4, Op. 74 for String Orchestra (1968-70)

Plamen Djurov/Sofia Soloists
( + Tapkov: Microsymphony, Nikolov: Meditations and Pironkov: Requiem for an Unknown Young Man)
GEGA GD 273 (2002)

Vasil Kazandjiev/Sofia Soloists Chamber Ensemble
( + Symphony No. 1)
BALKANTON BCA 1212 (LP) (1960s)

Revolutionary Symphony (Cantata) "Svatba" (The Wedding), Op.10 for Mixed Chorus and Orchestra (1931-5)

Dimiter Manolov/Bulgarian A Capella Choir "Sv. Obretanov"/Sofia State Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 3)
BALKANTON BCA 1305 (LP) (1970s)

 

SIMEON PIRONKOV
(1927-2000, BULGARIAN)

Born in Lom. He studied at State Academy of Music majoring in composition under Parashkev Hadjiev and conducting under Assen Dimitrov. He worked as a freelance composer and then joined the teaching staff of the National Theatre and Film Art Academy. His compositions cover various genres from opera and oratorio to solo vocal and instrumental works and film scores. Among his orchestral works is a Symphony for Strings (1960).

Chamber Symphony for 11 Soloists (1990)

Simeon Pironkov Jr./Sofia Soloists Chamber Orchestra
( + Requiem for an Unknown Young Man, String Quartet No. 3 and Entrata e Capriccio)
GEGA NEW CD GD 160 (1995)



JAROMÍR PODEŠVA
(1927-2000, CZECH)

Born in Brno. Born into a musical family, his father oversaw his early musical studies. Then he studied composition under Jaromir Kvapil at the Brno Conservatory and then at the Janáček Academy of Music in Brno. In addition, he went abroad and had studies in France with Henri Dutilleux and in America with Aaron Copland. He taught composition at the Ostrava Conservatory and wrote musical textbooks. He wrote some stage music but composed mostly orchestral, chamber and vocal works. His unrecorded Symphonies are: Nos. 1 (1950-1), 2 for Strings and Flute (1961), 5 for Baritone and Orchestra "3 Fragments of the Quinquennium" (1967) and 9 (1989).

Symphony No. 3 "Culmination--The Pearl at the Bottom: 2 Symphonic Parallels to the Ideas of Milan Kundera and Bohumil Hrabal" (1966)

Jiří Pinkas/Brno State Philharmonic
( + Piňos: Double Concerto for Cello, Piano, Winds, and Percussion)
PANTON 040 9996 (LP) (1967)

Symphony No. 4 for Flute, Harpsichord and Strings "Sinfonia da Camera" (1967)

Miroslav Matyáš/Czech Chamber Soloists
( + Válek: Symphony No. 13)
SUPRAPHON 1110 3399 (LP) (1984)


Symphony No. 6 (1970)

Miloš Konvalinka/Prague Symphony Orchestra, Prague
( + Matěj: Symphony No. 3)
PANTON 11 0269 (LP) (1971)

Josef Hrnčíř/Czechoslovak Radio Chorus/Czechoslovak Radio Symphony Orchestra, Prague
( + Podešva: Symphony No. 6)
PANTON 110 269 (LP) (1971)


Symphony No. 7 "In Memoriam J.P. jun (1951–1972): 3 Parallels to Texts by K. Macha and L. Stehlik" (1982–83)

Petr Vronsky/Brno State Philharmonic
( + Feld: Harp Concerto)
SUPRAPHON 1119 3666 (LP) (1984)


Symphony No. 8 "Ostrava" (1987)

Rostislav Hališka/Gottwaldov State Symphony Orchestra
( + Vacek: Symphony No. 2)
PANTON 81 0480 (LP) (1988)


Symphony No. 10 "Initium Ultimum" (1993)

Otakar Trhlik/Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Kohoutek: The Only Hope, Matys: "Written by Grief into Silence," and Blatny: Play Jazz, Play Rock, Play New Music)
THE MORAVIAN COMPOSERS' CLUB BRNO "LIVE" 2 (promo CD) (2001)


Sinfonietta Festiva for Chamber Orchestra (1983)

Mario Klemens/Musici Pragensis
( + Matej: Bassoon Concerto and Báchorek: Excuses for Pupils in Detention)
PANTON 81120533 (LP) (1985)




JOZEF PODPROCKÝ
(b.1944, SLOVAK)

Born in Žakarovce. He studied piano with Irena Korenová and composition with Juraj Hatrík at the Košice Conservatory and then continued his composition studies with Jan Cikker and Alexander Moyzes at the Academy of Performing Arts, Bratislava. After graduating, he was appointed theory and composition lecturer at the Košice Conservatory. He composed orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. His other Symphonies are: Nos 2, Op. 39 "Ecce Homo" (1997) and 3, Op. 47 "Hommage à Jozef Grešák" (2004).

Symphony (No. 1) in 2 Movements, Op.30 (1987)

Bohdan Warchal/Slovak Chamber Orchestra
( + Domanský: A Praise Of Country, Zeljenka: Music for Warchal and Bokes: Symphony No. 3)
OPUS 9110 1778 (LP) (1988)

 

ZDENĚK POLOLANIK
(b. 1935, CZECH)

Born in Brno. He studied organ and composition with Vilem Petrželka and Theodor Schaefer at the Janáček Academy. As a freelance composer, he has written extensively, including more than 350 film, television, and radio scores. His unrecorded Symphonies are: Nos. 1 (1961), 2 for 11 Winds (1962), 3 for Percussion and Organ (1962) and 5 (1969). He also composed a Sinfonietta (1958).

Symphony No. 4 for Strings (1963)

Jiří Pinkas/Brno State Philharmonic
( + Klega: Violin Concerto-Partita)
PANTON 040 9995 (1966)


DORU POPOVICI
(b.1932, ROMANIAN)

Born in Reşiţa. He studied composition with Mihail Jora and Mihail Andricu at the Bucharest Academy) and also attended the summer courses in Darmstadt, Germany. He worked as a musical editor at Romanian Radio. His catalogue includes opera, ballets, orchestral, chamber and vocal works. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 1 (1962), 2 (1966) and 3 for Chorus and Orchestra "Byzantine" (1968).

Symphony No. 4 for Chorus and Orchestra "In Memoria lui Nicolae Iorga" (1973)

Emanuel Elenescu/ Romanian Radio and Television Symphony Chorus/Romanian Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Varga: Concerto for Orchestra)
ELECTRECORD ECE 01040 (LP) (1971)

 

TOMA PROŠEV
(1931–1996, MACEDONIAN)


Born in Skopje. He studied a the Zagreb Music Academy and Ljubljana Music Academy and completed his studies with Nadia Boulanger in Paris. Later he taught in various music schools and after 1967 at the
High School of Music in Skopie. He composed operas, ballets, orchestral, chamber, instrumental, choral and vocal works. His 3 unrecorded Symphonies are: Nos. 1 (1962), 2 for Strings (1971) and 4 (1977).

Symphony No. 3 (1976)

Uros Lajovic/Slovenian Philharmonic Orchestra, Ljubljana
( + Chamber Music No. 2, and Integrali for Piano and Chamber Orchestra)
DISKOS LPD 718/5 (LP 5 of a 10-LP set)



BRONISŁAW KAZIMIERZ PRZYBYLSKI
(1941-2011, POLISH)

Born in Łódź. He studied theory of music withr Franciszek Wesołowski and composition with Tomasz Kiesewetter at the State College of Music in Łódź. He completed his study of composition with Bołeslaw Szabelski in Katowice and Roman Haubenstock-Ramati at the Hochschule für Musik in Vienna. He then taught at the State College of Music in Łódź where he became the head of the Composition Department. He composed prolifically in various genres. His other Symphonies are: Sinfonia Corale (1981, Sinfonia Affresco (1982) and Sinfonia-Anniversario (1983-95).

Sinfonia Polacca (1974)

Antoni Wit/Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Sinfonia da Requiem, Four Nocturnes from Kurpie, In honorem Nicolai Copernici, Concerto Polacca, A Varsovie, Return and Folklore – Suite for String Orchestra)
DUX DUX0866-7 (2 CDs) (2012)

Sinfonia da Requiem for Voice and Orchestra (1976)

Jerzy Katlewicz/Jadwiga Gadulanka (soprano)/Polish Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra, Krakow
( + Sinfonia Polacca, Four Nocturnes from Kurpie, In honorem Nicolai Copernici, Concerto Polacca, A Varsovie, Return and Folklore – Suite for String Orchestra)
DUX DUX0866-7 (2 CDs) (2012)


ALEXANDER RAICHEV
(1922-2003, BULGARIAN)

Born in Lom. He studied composition with Assen Karastoyanov and Parashkev Hadjiev at the Sofia State Conservatory and then privately with Pancho Vladigerov. He went on for post-graduate studies at the Liszt Music Academy in Budapest where he studied composition with János Viski and Zoltán Kodály and conducting with János Ferencsik. He worked at the Music Section of Radio Sofia and later conducted the orchestra of the National Youth Theatre prior to joining the staff of the State Academy of Music as lecturer in harmony and later as professor of harmony and composition. He composed operas, operettas, ballets, orchestral, chamber and choral works. There is an unrecorded Symphony No. 6 (1994).

Symphony No. 1 (Symphony-Cantata) for Mixed Choir and Orchestra "He Never Dies" (1952)

Konstantin Iliev/Bulgarian A Capella Choir "Sv. Obretanov"/Sofia State Philharmonic Orchestra
BALKANTON BCA 1307 (LP) (1960s)

Vasil Stefanov/Bulgarian Radio Symphony Orchestra and Chorus
BALKANTON 0184 (LP) (1950s)


Symphony No. 2 "The New Prometheus" (1958)

Vasil Stefanov/Bulgarian Radio Symphony Orchestra
BALKANTON BCA 176 (LP) (1960s)

Yevgeny Svetlanov/USSR State Symphony Orchestra (rec. 1965)
( + Vladigerov: Piano Concertos Nos. 3 and 4 and Marinov: Fantastic Scenes)
MELODIYA D 016547-52 (3 LPs) (1965)


Symphony No. 3 "Strivings" (1966)

Dimiter Manolov/Sofia State Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Bulgaria-White, Green, Red Oratorio)
BALKANTON BCA 2035 (LP) (1970s)

Ivan Voulpe/Bourgas State Symphony Orchestra
( + Stravinsky: Firebird Suite)
BALKANTON BCA 1131 (LP) (c. 1968)


Symphony No. 4 for String Orchestra (1968)

Vasil Kazandjiev/Sofia Soloists Chamber Ensemble
( + Vladigerov: 7 Pieces for Strings)
BALKANTON BCA 1177 (LP) (1970s)

Symphony No. 5 for Chamber Orchestra (1972)

Vasil Stefanov/Bulgarian Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Burning Dawn Overture)
BALKANTON BCA 1392 (LP) (1970s)




MIROSLAV RAICHL
(1930-1998, CZECH)

Born in Náchod. He studied composition under Pavel Bořkovec at the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague where he stayed on as postgraduate composition student of Vaclav Dobiáš. He worked for the Czech Music Fund and the Union of Czechoslovak Composers and then taught at the Prague Conservatory and at the Conservatory in Pardubice. He composed an opera, orchestral, chamber and vocal works. His Symphony No. 1 is from 1955.

Symphony No. 2 (1958-60)

Alois Klíma/Czechoslovak Radio Symphony Orchestra
SUPRAPHON SUA 18501 (LP) (1960s)


Sinfonietta No. 1 for Chamber Orchestra (1976-7)

Eduard Fischer/Dvo·ák Chamber Orchestra
( + Stepanek: Promena)
PANTON 81110298 (LP) (1982)


Sinfonietta No. 2 for Chamber Orchestra (1985)

Vít Micka/Pilsen Radio Orchestra
( + Zamečnik: Concerto Grosso and Odstrčil: The White Dove)
PANTON 81100628 (LP) (1986)

 

ĽUDOVIT RAJTER
(1906-2000, SLOVAK)

Born in Pezinok. He studied at the School of Music for Slovakia in Bratislava with Frico Kafenda for piano and R. Rupník for cello and then went on to the Hochschule für Musik und darstellende Kunst in Vienna where he studied composition with Franz Schmidt and Joseph Marx and conducting with Clemens Krauss. He taught the theory of music and cello at the Town School of Music in Bratislava and the became an assistent to Clemens Krauss at his Master Courses in Salzburg.His composition studies continued at the Franz Liszt Academy in Budapest where his teacher was Erno Dohnányi.
1933 – 1945 the first conductor of the Symphony Orchestra of the Hungarian Radio in Budapest. He had an illustrious acdemic career at the Academy of Music and Drama in Bratislavaand and was also a co-founder and the first conductor of the Slovak Philharmonic. He composed a ballet, incidental music, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works.

Sinfonietta for Large Orchestra (1927-8)

David Porcelijn/Janáček Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Divertimento, Symphonic Suite, Das Pressburger
Maifest-Ballet Music and Impressioni Rapsodiche)
CPO 777574-2 (2011)



PRIMOŽ RAMOVŠ
(1921-1999, SLOVENE)

Born in Ljubljana. At the Ljubljana Academy of Music, he studied composition with Slavko Osterc and went to Italy for further studies in Siena with Vito Frazzi and with Alfredo Casella and Goffredo Petrassi in Rome. He joined the staff of the library of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts and also taught at the Ljubljana Conservatory. He produced a vast catalogue of ccompositions covering the genres of orchestral, chamber, instrumental, vocal and choral works as well as music for the stage and films. He composed these additional Symphonies: Nos. 1 (1940), 2 (1943) and 3 (1948) and a Symphony for Piano and Orrchestra (1970)

Symphony No. 4 "Simfonija 68" (1968)

Samo Hubad/Ljubljana Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Petric: Integrals in Colors and Sonorous Reflections to the Kosovel's Poetry)
HELODON FLP 10001 (LP) (1970s)

Marko Munih/Slovene Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 4 and Musiques Funebres)
RTVS/SAZAS 107870 CD


Symphony No. 5 "Simfonija Pieta" (1995)

Marko Munih/Slovene Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 4 and Musiques Funebres)
RTVS/SAZAS 107870 CD


Sinfonietta (1951)

Milan Horvat/Slovene Pholharmonic Orchestra
( + Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5)
SLOVENE PHILHARMONIC SF 995018

Uroš Lajovic/Ljubljana Radio and Television Chamber Orchestra
( + Cello Concerto and Concerto for for Violin, Viola and Orchestra)
RTV LJUBLJANA LD 540 (LP)




GYÖRGY RÁNKI
(1907-1992, HUNGARIAN)

Born in Budapest. He studied composition with Zoltán Kodály at the Budapest Academy of Music and later studied folk music with László Lajtha at the Museum of Ethnography in Budapest. He lived in London and Paris where he studiedc Asian folk musics. Back in Hungary, he directed the music section of Hungarian Radio before completely devoting himself to composing. He composed music over a broad range that included popular music but also opera, ballet, orchestral, chamber, choral and vocal works.

Symphony No. 1 (1977)

Ádám Medveczky/Hungarian State Orchestra
( + Cimbalom Concerto and Viola Concerto)
HUNGAROTON SLPX 12434 (LP) (1983)




KAROL RATHAUS
(1895-1954, POLISH > USA)

Born in Tarnopol, Galicia (now in Ukraine). At the age of 19, he moved to Vienna to enter the University and the Academy of Music where he studied composition with Franz Schreker. He made his début as a composer-pianist in Vienna in 1919 but moved to Berlin with Franz Schreker and other composers to form a select master class at the Hochschule für Musik.. After stays in Paris and London, Nazism moved him to America where he first worked in Hollywood but settled permanently in New York where he became professor of composition at Queens College for the remainder of his life. He composed in all genres from opera and ballet to works for solo instruments and voices. His only unrecorded Symphony is his Sinfonia Concertante, Op. 68 (1950–51).

Symphony No. 1, Op. 5 (1921-2)

Israel Yinon/Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin
( + Der Letzte Pierrot)
DECCA 455 315-2 (1998)


Symphony No. 2, Op. 7 (1923)

Israel Yinon/Brandenburg State Orchestra, Frankfurt
( + Symphony No. 3)
CPO 777 031-2 (2004)


Symphony No. 3, Op. 50 (1942-3)

Israel Yinon/Brandenburg State Orchestra, Frankfurt
( + Symphony No. 2)
CPO 777 031-2 (2004)




WERONIKA RATUSIŃSKA-ZAMUSZKO
(b.1977, POLAND)

Born in Warsaw. She studied composition with Włodzimierz Kotoński and Stanisław Moryto at the Fryderyk Chopin Music Academy in Warsaw. She had postgraduate studies with Louis Andriessen and Martijn Padding at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague. She holds appointments as assistant professor at the Fryderyk Chopin University of Music and at the Faculty of Instrumental Music and Music Education in Bialystok. She has composed orchestral, chamber, vocal and choral works.

Symphony (2008)

Miroslaw Jacek Błaszczyk/Silesian Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra
( + Sinfonietta, Cello Concerto, Divertimento and Gasherbrum)
DUX DUX 0723 (2010)

Sinfonietta for String Orchestra (1997)

Miroslaw Jacek Błaszczyk/Silesian Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony, Cello Concerto, Divertimento and Gasherbrum)
DUX DUX 0723 (2010)

 


ANTON REICHA
(1770–1836, CZECH)

Born in Prague. He studied in Bonn and later in Vienna where he studied with Antonio Salieri and Johann Albrechtsberger. He eventually settled in Paris. His fame rests on his for his substantial early contribution to the wind quintet literature and his role as a teacher. Among his pupils were Franz Liszt and Hector Berlioz. He composed a vast amount of music in mostf genres and forms, from opera to solo works. Much of his output does not survive.

Symphony in E flat major, Op. 41 (c. 1803)

Peter Gülke/Wuppertal Symphony Orchestra
( + Concertante for Flute, Violin and Orchestra and Overture in D)
MD&G (DABRINGHAUS & GRIMM) GOLD 3350661 (1996)

Hans-Martin Linde/Cappella Coloniensis
( + 18th century symphonies and overtures by J.C. Bach, Dittersdorf, Gossec, Kraus, Mahaut and Vanhal)
CAPRICCIO RECORDS 71110 (2 CDs) (2006)

Prague Chamber Orchestra
( + Vořišek: Symphony in D)
SUPRAPHON SUAST50007 (LP) (1962)

Vojtech Spurny/Czech Philharmonic Chamber Orchestra
( + 18th century symphonies by Brixi, Kozeluch and Linek)
MUSICAL CONCEPTS 1003 (2003)

Commemoration Symphony for Band (1815)

Eugene Migliaro Corporon/Cincinnati Wind Symphony
( + Gould: Symphony No. 4, Ives: Old Home Days, Gillingham: Heroes Lost and Fallen and McTee: Circuits)
KLAVIER RECORDS 11042 (1993)

 

IVAN ŘEZÁČ
(1924-1977, CZECH)

Born in Řevnice, Prague. He studied piano with František Rauch and composion with Václav Dobiáš at the Prague Academy of Performing Arts where he then worked as a teacher of theory and was he was director of the Prague Symphony Orchestra. He composed an opera, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. His other Symphonies are No. 1 (1958) and Sinfonietta for Cello and Orchestra "Homecoming" (1962).

Symphony No. 2 in C major (1961)

Jiří Bělohlávek/Prague Symphony Orchestra
( + Piano Concerto No. 3)
PANTON 8110 0155 (LP) (1981)


Sinfonietta "The Angel on the Garbage Heath" (1973)

Jindřich Rohan/Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Parsch: The Bird Flew Above the Clouds)
SUPRAPHON 1110 2339 (LP) (1978)

Ladislav Slovák/Prague Symphony Orchestra
( + Martinů: Symphony No. 6 and Loudova: Chorale)
PANTON 8113 73-2 (1995)




PAUL RICHTER
(1875-1950, ROMANIAN)

Born in Braşov. As a child, he began lessons on the piano, organ and in harmony. He went to Leipzig to study philosophy but transferred to the Conservatory there where he studied with Salomon Jadassohn, Artur Nikisch and Carl Reinicke. While in Germany, he worked as a choral conductor and when he returned to of Braşov he became well known as a concert pianist, chamber musician and conductor. He composed orchestrral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 1 in E minor (1905, rev. 1917), 2 in G minor (1907), 4 in A minor (1933), 5 in D (1936) and 6. in G (1946–9).

Symphony No. 3 in G minor (1926)

George Dima Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra, Brasov
( + Suite No. 2)
ELECTRECORD ST-ECE 01346 (LP) (1971)




JAROSLAV ŘÍDKÝ
(1897-1956, CZECH)

Born in Františkov, near Liberec. At the Prague Conservatory he studied with Karl Boleslav Jirák, Josef Bohuslav Foerster and Jaroslav Křička and continued his training in Foerster’s master classes. He worked as a harpist in the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra and conductor of the Czech Philharmonic Choir. In addition, he taught composition at the Prague Conservatory and Academy of Music where he was appointed a professor. He composed orchestral, chamber and vocal works as well as some light music and folksong arrangements. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 1, Op. 3 (1924), 2 (with obligato cello), Op. 4 (1925), 3, Op. 8 (1927), 4, Op. 10 (1928), 5, Op. 17 (1931) and 6, Op. 35 "The Year 1938" (unfinished sketch) (1938) and also a Sinfonietta in C minor, Op. 1 (1923).


Symphony No. 7, Op. 47 (1955)


Václav Neumann/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
PANTON 8110 0368 (LP) (1983)

 

MILAN RISTIĆ
(1908-1982, SERBIAN)

Born in Belgrade. He studied privately in Paris with Gabriel Piérson and then studied composition with Predrag Milošević and Josip Slavenski at the Belgrade Music School and also attended Alois Hába’s microtonal classes at the Prague Conservatory. He joined the staff of Belgrade Radio where he worked as a piano accompanist. He was a prolific composer of mostly orchestral, chamber and instrumental works. His unrecorded Symphonies are: Nos. 1 (1941), 2 (1951), 3 (1961), 4 (1966), 5 (1967), 6 (1968), 7 (1972) and 9 (1976) as well as a Sinfonietta (c. 1940).

Symphony No. 8 (1974)


Mladen Jagust/Belgrade Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + 5 Pieces for Chamber Orchestra)
RTB LP 2517 (LP) (1970s)


 

DOINA (NEMŢEANU)-ROTARU
(b.1951, ROMANIAN)

Born Bucharest. She studied at the Bucharest Conservatory where her teachers included Viorel Cosma, Tudor Ciortea, Ştefan Niculescu and Tiberiu Olah. She became a lecturer at the Enescu Academy and was then appointed professor of harmony, counterpoint and composition at the Bucharest Conservatory. She has composed orchestral, chamber, instrumental and choral works. Her Symphony I is from 1985.

Symphony II (1988)

Ludovic Bács/Romanian National Radio Orchestra (2000)
(included in collection: "Romanian Symphonic Works, Volume 3")
EDITURA MUSICALA (UMCR) 006-7 (2 CDs) (2000)
(original LP release: ELECTRECORD ST-ECE 03669) (1988)

Barrie Webb/Huddersfield University Orchestra
( + Flute Concerto No. 1 and Saxophone Concerto No. 1)
MPS CD007 (1998)

Symphony III "Spirit of Elements" (2001)

Norichika Iimori/Tokyo Philharmonic
( + Clocks, L'Éternel Rétour and Florilegium)
ELECTRECORD EDC 461 (2002)




MIKLÓS RÓZSA
(1907-1995, HUNGARIAN > USA)

Born in Budapest. As a child, he studied the piano with his mother, a classmate of Bartók at the Budapest Academy, and the violin and viola with his uncle, Lajos Berkovits, a musician with the Royal Hungarian Opera and started composing and collecting folk music. He then went to the Leipzig Conservatory, where he studied composition with Hermann Grabner and musicology with Theodor Kroyer. He moved on to Paris, London and eventually Hollywood where he established himself as one of the greatest masters of film composing. He also taught film music at the University of Southern California. In addition to his numerous film score, he composed orchestral, chamber, vocal and choral works.

Symphony in 3 Movements, Op. 6 (1930, rev. 1993)

James Sedares/New Zealand Symphony Orchestra
( + The Vintner's Daughter)
KOCH INTERNATIONAL CLASSICS 3-7224-2 (1994)


Sinfonia Concertante, Op. 29 for Violin, Cello and Orchestra (1966, rev. 1978)

James Sedares/Igor Grupppman (violin)/Richard Bock (cello)/New Zealand Symphony Orchestra
( + Viola Concerto)
KOCH INTERNATIONAL CLASSICS 3-7304-2 (1996)

Barry Wordsworth/Philippe Graffin (violin)/Raphael Wallfisch (cello)/BBC Concert Orchestra
( + Cello Concerto)
ASV GOLD GLD 4018 (2006)


ZBIGNIEW RUDZINSKI
(b.1935, POLISH)

Born in Czechowice. He studied composition with Piotr Perkowski at the Warsaw Academy and then with Nadia Boulanger in Paris. In the 1960s he formed the contemporary music ensemble "Ad Novum" with fellow-composer and pianist Tomasz Sikorski. He was appointed to the staff of the Warsaw Conservatory in 1973. He has composed operas, orchestral, chamber and vocal works as well as film scores.

Symphony for Male Choir and Orchestra (1969)


Jan Krenz/Men's Choir/Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Kotonski: Music for 16 Cymbals and Strings and Serocki: Poezje)
MUZA M-3 XW 1181–82.(non-commercial WARSAW AUTUMN LP) (1969)

 

RUDOLF RŮŽIČ KA
(b. 1941, CZECH)

He was born in Brno and studied music at the conservatory there and then at the Janáček Academy with Theodor Schaefer, Miloslav Ištvan and Miloslav Kabeláč. He is a pioneer in using computers to compose music, his first such piece appearing in 1965. He has composed more than 200 pieces for orchestra, electroacoustics and computers, and wrote the first book in the Czech language detailing the technique of computer composition. His 3 earlier unrecorded symphonies are not numbered: "Cosmic Symphony" for Organ and Orchestra (1971), Concerto-Symphony for Violin and Orchestra (1972), and Symphony for 2 Orchestras and Electroacoustic Sounds (1984).

Symphony No. 4 "Victory" (1974)

Stanislav Vavrinek/Moravian Philharmonic, Olomouc
( + Slezak: Symphony No. 4, Peska: 20 x 20, Lejsek: Preludes, and Mayer: Symphonia Islandica, movement III only)
THE MORAVIAN COMPOSERS' CLUB BRNO "LIVE" 3 (promo CD) (2006)


DIMITAR SAGAEV
(1915-2003, BULGARIAN)

Born in Plovdiv. He first studied the piano with Asen Dimitrov and Dimiter Nenov before entering the State Academy of Music where he studied composition with Vessilin Stoyanov and Pancho Vladigerov. He then worked as music a teacher, bandmaster, director of art music for Bulgarian Radio and as director of the music department of the Ministry of Culture. Subsequently, he was appointed as a teacher at the Sofia State Academy of Music where he became dean of the theory faculty, chair for music theory department and professor of orchestration. He composed operas, ballets, film scores, orchestral, chamber, instrumenyal, vocal and choral works. His unrecorded Symphonies are: Nos. 1 for Female Choir, Soloist, Reciter and Orchestra (1964), 2 for Large Wind Orchestra, Male and Children's Choir (1977), 4 (1980), 6 for Mezzo-Soprano, Reciter and Orchestra "The Samara Banner" (1982) and 7 "Romantic" (1987).

Symphony No. 3 for Mezzo-Soprano, Baritone, Narrator and Orchestra "Khan Asparukh" (1979)

Vasil Stefanov/Veselina Zorova (mezzo)/Emil Ugrinov (baritone)/Bulgarian National Radio Symphony Orchestra
BALKANTON BCA 1300437 (LP) (c. 1980)


Symphony No. 6 for Mezzo-Soprano, Narrator and Orchestra "September" (1981)

Emil Tabakov/Rena Penkova (mezzo)/Andrei Chapazov (narrator)/Bulgarian National Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + The Black Sun)
BALKANTON BCA 11495 (LP) (1980s)



BRANIMIR SAKAČ
(1918–1979, CROATIAN)


Born in Zagreb. He studied composition at the Music Academy in Zagreb and then taught there before becoming a conductor and later staff editor-in-chief at the Zagreb Radio. He taught music theory at the State School of Zagreb. In the 1950s, he became one of the first composers in the Yugoslavian region to adopt advanced musical techniques, which by the 1970s included electronic music. His one unrecorded symphony is his "Symphony of the Dead Soldier" (1951).

Matrix Symphony, for Voices and Orchestra (1972)

Uros Lajovic/3 vocal soloists/Slovenian Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Ad Litteram, Barasou, and Synthana)
JUGOTON LSY-61134





TIBOR SÁRAI
(1919-1995, HUNGARIAN)

Born in Budapest. He studied composition with Pál Kadosa and held administrative appointments with the Hungarian Musicians’ Free Association, music department at the Ministry of Culture and of the Hungarian Radio music department. He then taught at the Budapest Conservatory before becoming a professor at the Budapest Academy of Music. He composed, orchestral, chamber, instrumental, vocal and choral works. He composed his Symphony No. 3 in 1987.

Symphony No. 1 (1965-7)

Gyorgy Lehel/Hungarian Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Serenade for String Orchestra, String Quartet No. 2 and Diagnosis '69)
HUNGAROTON SLPX 11636 (LP) (1976)

Symphony No. 2 for Soprano and Orchestra (1972-3)

György Lehel/Katalin Szökefalvy-Nagy (soprano)/Budapest Symphony Orchestra
( + Musica per 45 corde and String Quartet No. 1)
HUNGAROTON SLPX 11753 (1977)




ISTVÁN SÁRKÖZY
(1920-2002, HUNGARIAN)

Born in Pesterzsébet. He studied composition at the Higher Music School in Budapest with Ferenc Farkas before study at the Liszt Academy of Music with Zoltán Kodály, Tibor Szatmári and János Viski. He worked at various jobs including secretary of the Bartók College and music critic of the daily paper Népszava. Later on he was appointed artistic adviser to the National Philharmonic Concert Bureau and the Hungarian Recording Company and as a teacher of theory and then composition at the Liszt Academy of Music. He composed music for the stage and film scores as well as orchestral, chamber, instrumental, choral and vocal works.

Sinfonia Concertante for Clarinet and 24 Strings (1963, 2nd version, + 12 Woodwinds, 1964)


Vilmos Tátrai/Béla Kovács (clarinet)/Hungarian Chamber Orchestra
( + Concerto Grosso and Shepherd's Ballad)
HUNGARITON SLPX 11667 (LP) (1975)

János Sándor/György Balassa (clarinet)/Hungarian State Orchestra
( + Tardos: Evocation and Kósa: Symphony No. 8)
HUNGAROTON SLPX 1297 (LP) (1968)


FAZIL SAY
(b.1970, TURKISH)

Born in in Ankara. He studied piano and composition at the Ankara State Conservatory. He then continued his studies with David Levine at the Robert Schumann Institute in Düsseldorf and went on to the Berlin Conservatory. In addition to composing, he has had a brilliant international career as a pianist. He has composed orchestral, chamber and piano music. He has also written Sinfonia Concertante for Piano and Orchestra, Op. 3 (1993).

Symphony No. 1, Op. 28 "Istanbul"(2009)

Dan Ettinger/Orchestra of Nationaltheater Mannheim
( + Concerto for Ney Flute)
NAIVE V5315 (2012)

Symphony No. 2, Op. 38 "Mesopotamia" (2011)

Gürer Aykal/Borusan Istanbul Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 3)
NAIVE V5346 (2012)

Symphony No. 3, Op. 43"Universe" (2012)

Gürer Aykal/Borusan Istanbul Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 3)
NAIVE V5346 (2012)

Chamber Symphony, Op. 6 (1996)

Scott Yoo/Metamorphosen Chamber Orchestra,
( + Piano Concerto No. 2, 2 Ballads for Orchestea and Piano; Four Dances of Nasreddin Hoja and Fantasy Pieces)
TROPPE NOTE/CAMBRIA CD-1404 (1999)



AHMET ADNAN SAYGUN
(1907-1991, TURKISH)

Born in Izmir. As a youth he sang in the chorus of his elementary school and he took piano lessons. He then worked as a music teacher and won a scholarship to study music in Paris. His first teacher at the Paris Conservatory was Eugène Borrel and then he attended Vincent d’Indy’s composition classes at the Schola Cantorum. Returning home, he taught counterpoint at the Music Teachers School and became briefly conductor of the Ankara Presidential Symphony Orchestra. He continued his academic career at the Istanbul Municipal Conservatory and later taught composition at the Ankara State Conservatory. He composed operas, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and choral works.

Symphony No. 1, Op. 29 (1953)

Howard Griffiths/Northern Sinfonia
( + Concerto da Camera)
KOCH SCHWANN MUSICA MUNDI 3-6746-2 (2000)

Ari Rasilainen/Rheinland-Pfalz State Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2)
CPO 999819-2 (2002)

Symphony No. 2, Op. 30 (1958)

Ari Rasilainen/Rheinland-Pfalz State Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 1)
CPO 999819-2 (2002)


Symphony No. 3, Op. 39 (1961)

Fedor Glushchenko/USSR State Academic Symphony Orchestra
( + Arutyunyan: Festive Overture)
MELODIYA A10-00569 (LP) (1989)

Ari Rasilainen/Rheinland-Pfalz State Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 5)
CPO 999968-2 (2004)

Symphony No. 4, Op. 53 (1976)

Ari Rasilainen/Rheinland-Pfalz State Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Violin Concerto and Suite)
CPO 777043-2 (2005)

Symphony No. 5, Op. 70 (1984)

Ari Rasilainen/Rheinland-Pfalz State Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 3)
CPO 999968-2 (2004)




THEODOR SCHAEFER
(1904-1969, CZECH)

Born in Telč He studied composition with Jaroslav Kvapil at the Brno Conservatory and completed his composition studies in Vitězslav Novák’s masterclass in Prague. He taught at music schools in Kutná Hora and Brno and then theory and composition at the Brno Conservatory, moving up to the Academy where he became a professor. He conducted amateur choirs and orchestras in Kutná Hora and Brno. He composed some works for the stage as well as orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works.

Symphony, Op. 25 (1959-62)


Jiří Waldhans/Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra
PANTON 11 0371 (LP) (1975)



BOGUSŁAV SCHÄFFER
(b.1929, POLISH)

Born in Lwów (now in Ukraine). In Kraków, he studied musicology with Zdzisław Jachimecki at the University while studying composition with Artur Malawski at the State Higher School of Music. He first worked as a music critic but has mostly worked since as a composer and teacher. He taught at the Kraków Academy and later joined the staff of the Salzburg Mozarteum. He composed an enormous catalogue of works in many genres and many styles, both traditional and advanced. His other Symphonies are: Symphony-Music for Orchestra (1967), Symphony in 9 Pieces for 9 Soloists and Orchestra (1973), Sinfonia (1988), Nos. 4 (1993), 5 "Sinfonietta for Chamber Orchestra" (1995), 6 (1996) and 7 (1997).

Little Symphony "Scultura" (1960)


Andrzej Markowski/Poznan Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1965)
( + Moszumanska-Nazar: Interpretations, Woytowicz: Symphony #3 and Dobrowolski: Music for Orchestra)
MUZA SX 2315 (LP) (1960s) ( first appeared on a non-commercial 1965 WARSAW AUTUMN LP XW-573/574)



MIKULÁŠ SCHNEIDER-TRNAVSKÝ
(1881-1958, SLOVAK)

Born in Trnava (original name Schneider). He studied composition at the Conservatories of Budapest (with János Koessler), Vienna (with Hermann Grädener) and Prague (with Karel Stecker). He was the choirmaster of Trnava Cathedral for almost a half century and later was also a music school inspector. He mostly wrote sacred and incidental music, art songs and arrangements of folk music but also an operetta and some orchestral and chamber works.

Symphony in E minor "Reminiscence" (1955-6)

Ondrej Lenárd/Bratislava Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Pribina's Oath, Violin Sonata and Choral Songs)
OPUS 9110 1093-4 (2 LPs) (1981)




ERWIN SCHULHOFF
(1894-1942, CZECH)

Born in Prague, He first studied privately, and then from 1904 at the Prague Conservatory in the piano class of Jindřich z Albestu Kàan and was also taught briefly by Josef Jiránek, a pupil of Bedřich Smetana. From here he moved to Vienna to the Horaksche Klavierschule where he was a piano pupil of Willi Thern and then studied composition with Max Reger at the Leipzig Conservatory and completed his training at the Cologne Conservatory. He taught piano privately and was also on the faculty of the Prague Conservatory. He perished in the Holocaust. An extremely prolific composer, he composed operas, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works.

Symphony No. 1, Op. 50 (1925)


George A. Albrecht/Philharmonia Hungarica
( + Symphonies Nos. 2 and 3)
CPO 999251-2 (1994)

Vladimir Válek/Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2)
SUPRAPHON 112160-2 (1995)

Israel Yimon/Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Festliches Vorspiel and Suite for Chamber Orchestra)
KOCH SCHWANN 31437-2 (1995)


Symphony No. 2, Op. 81 (1932)

George A. Albrecht/Philharmonia Hungarica
( + Symphonies Nos. 1 and 3)
CPO 999251-2 (1994)

Gerd Albrecht/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Haas: Study for Strings, Klein: Partita and Ullmann: Symphony No.2)
ORFEO C337941A (1994)

James Conlon/Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 5 and Suite for Chamber Orchestra)
CAPRICCIO 67080 (2004)

Ernst Theis/Austrian Chamber Symphony
( + Double Concerto for Flute and Piano and Mautner: United Colours)
MUSICAPHON 56829 (2000)

Vladimir Válek/Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 1)
SUPRAPHON 112160-2 (1995)

Marcello Viotti/Saarbrücken Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Suite for Chamber Orchestra and Ogelala: Ballettmysterium)
ARTE NOVA ARTE NOVA 7432127802-2 (1993)

Israel Yimon/Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 3 and Concerto for String Quartet and Winds)
KOCH SCHWANN 31543-2 (1995)


Symphony No. 3, Op. 85 (1935)

George A. Albrecht/Philharmonia Hungarica
( + Symphonies Nos. 1 and 2)
CPO 999251-2 (1994)

Vladimir Válek/Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 5)
SUPRAPHON 112161-2 (1996)

Israel Yimon/Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2 and Concerto for String Quartet and Winds)
KOCH SCHWANN 31543-2 (1995)


Symphony No. 4, Op. 88 for Baritone and Orchestra "Spanish" (1936-7)

Vladimir Válek/Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 6)
SUPRAPHON 112162-2 (1997)


Symphony No. 5, Op. 89 "À Romain Rolland" (1938-9)

James Conlon/Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2 and Suite for Chamber Orchestra)
CAPRICCIO 67080 (2004)

Gunther Schuller/West German Radio Symphony Orchestra, Cologne
( + Piano Concerto No. 2)
KOCH SCHWANN 31597-2 (1995)

Vladimir Válek/Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 5)
SUPRAPHON 112161-2 (1996)


Symphony No. 6, Op. 94 for Baritone, Chorus and Orchestra "Symphony of Freedom" (1940-1)

Vladimir Válek/Roman Janál (baritone)/Kühn Mixed Choir/Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 6)
SUPRAPHON 112162-2 (1997)


Symphony for Mezzo-Soprano and Orchestra, Op. 26 "Landschaften" (1918-9)

Gerd Albrecht/Doris Soffel (mezzo-soprano)/Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin
( + Menschheit and Bourgeois Gentilhomme: Suite)
ORFEO C056031A (2004)


Symphonia Germanica (1919)

Werner Herbers/Panc Daalder (percussion)/Ebony Band
( + Wolkenpumpe and Bass Nachtigall)
CHANNEL CLASSICS 9997 (1997)

 

JAN SEIDEL
(1908-1998, CZECH)

Born in Nymburk. He studied composition at the Prague Conservatory, taking composition classes under Alois Hába and Josef Bohuslav Foerster. Later he worked in Prague's progressive theaters, writing incidental music. After the war, he helped develop the Czech recording industry and was the chief dramaturgist at the Prague National Theater; he eventually became chairperson of both the Committee of the Prague Spring International Music Festival and the Union of Czech Composers. His one unrecorded symphony is subtitled "Prologue" (1942).

Hunting Sinfonietta for Horn and Small Orchestra (1965-6)

Frantisek Vajnar/Vladimira Bouchalová (horn)/Musicians of Prague
( + Matys: Written by Grief into Silence and Hlobil: Symphony No. 6)
SUPRAPHON 1 19 1399 (LP) (1973)



TIBOR SERLY
(1901-1978, HUNGARIAN > USA)

Born in Losonc. He was born into a musical family that emigrated to New York in 1905. After initial musical studies with his father, he attended the Budapest Royal Academy where he studied composition with Zoltán Kodály, violin with Jenő Hubay and orchestration with Leo Weiner. On his return to America, he played the violin and viola in several orchestras and conducted his own music as well. When Béla Bartók and his wife arrived as refugees, Serly did his utmost to support them and also helped to complete or arrange some of Bartók's ultimate works. He composed ballets, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 1 (1931), 3 for String Orchestra (1956-8) and 4 in 4 Cycles for String Orchestra (1960).

Symphony No. 2 for Woodwinds, Brass and Percussion (1932)

Tibor Serly/Vienna Symphony Orchestra Winds and Percussion
( + Piano Concertino 3 x 3)
MUSICAL HERITAGE SOCIETY MHS 3360 (LP) (1976)



KAZIMIERZ SEROCKI
(1922-1981, POLISH)

Born in Toruń. He studied at the Łódż Academy with Kazimierz Sikorski for composition and Stanisław Szpinalski for piano and then did further work in Paris with Nadia Boulanger and Lazar Lévy. He initially pursued a career as a pianist but then chose composition as his main thrust and formed with Tadeusz Baird and Karol Stryja in a modernist composers group. He composed orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. His Symphonies are: Nos. 1 (1952) and 2 for Soprano, Baritone, Chorus and Orchestra "Symfonia Piesni" (Symphony of Songs) (1953, rev. 1959).

Sinfonietta for 2 String Orchestras (1956)

Witold Rowicki/Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Lutos·awski: Funeral Music and Baird: 4 Essays)
MUZA XL 0072 (non-commercial WARSAW AUTUMN LP) (1950s)
(original commercial release: PHILIPS 835 261 AY) (1960s)




ZDENĚK ŠESTÁK
(b.1925, CZECH)

Born in Citoliby u Loun. He entered the Prague Conservatory where he studied composition with Emil Hlobil and Miroslav Krejčí while also studying musicology at Prague University. In addition to composing, he became a scholar specializing in 18th-century Czech music. He composed orchestral, chamber, instrumental, vocal and choral works. His unrecorded Symphonies are: Nos. 1 "Symphonic Fantasy (Variations)" (1966), 5 "Chronos" (1978) and 6 "Eternal Unrest of Heart" (1979).

Symphony No. 2 (1970)


Josef Hrnčíř/Czechoslovak Radio Symphony Orchestra, Prague
( + Symphony No. 4, Cello Concerto No. 1 and Concerto for String Orchestra and Capturing a Point in Time)
CZECH RADIO CR0598-2 (2 CDS) (2013)
(original LP release: PANTON 110576) (1975)


Symphony No. 3 (1971)

Jaromir Nohejl/Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra, Olomouc
( + Jirašek: Festival Overture and Pauer: Canto Festivo)
PANTON 110320 (LP) (1972)


Symphony No. 4 for String Orchestra (1973)

František Vajnar/Prague Chamber Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2, Cello Concerto No. 1 and Concerto for String Orchestra and Capturing a Point in Time)
CZECH RADIO CR0598-2 (2 CDS) (2013)

MAREK SEWEN
(b.1930, POLISH)

Born in Poznań He graduated from the Music Academy in Poznań where he studied the viola, composition and conducting. He was a violist with the Poznań Philharmonic Orchestra and then with the Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra. He then also conducted both in Poland and abroad. He composed orchestral, instrumental, choral and vocal works as well as film scores and music for children. He wrote 2 further Symphonies: Nos. (2) for Tenor, Orator, Chorus and Orchestra (Oratorio-Symphony) "Will not Stop the Cantor's Song" (2003 ) and 3 for Soprano, Tenor, Chorus and Orchestra "The Pilgrim" (2004).

Symphony (No. 1) for Tenor and Orchestra "Sinfonia Sacra" (1995)

Marek Sewen/Paulos Raptis (tenor)/Olsztyn Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Stabat Mater and Meditation for Flute)
DUX RECORDS 0114 (2000)




YORGOS SICILIANOS
(1922-2005, GREEK)

Born in Athens. He studied harmony with Marios Varvoglis at the Hellenic Conservatory and with George Sklavos at the Athens Conservatory where he also continued his studies of counterpoint and fugue. He then studied with Ildebrando Pizzetti at the Accademia di Santa Cecilia in Rome and with Darius Milhaud and Tony Aubin at the Paris Conservatory. In addition, he went for further study in America with Walter Piston at Harvard, Boris Blacher at Tanglewood and with Vincent Persichetti at the Juilliard School. Returning home, he was appointed head of music services to the National Broadcasting Institute and held a number of other administrative posts and taught at the Pierce College of Music in Athens. He composed ballets, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. His other Symphonies are an unnumbered Symphony in B minor, Op. 3 (1941-7) and Symphony No. 2, Op.58 (1994–7).

Symphony No. 1, Op. 14 (1956)


Dimitri Mitropoulos/New York Philharmonic (rec. 1958)
( + Dragatakis: Koitoiki)
ARKHEIO 91065 (LP) (1987)



KAZIMIERZ SIKORSKI
(1895–1986, POLISH)

Born in Zurich to Polish parents. He graduated in from the Chopin Conservatory. in Warsaw an then completed his musical studies with Nadia Boulanger in Paris. He taught composition and theory at the higher schools of music in Łódż, Poznań and Warsaw, serving as director of the latter, and was president of the Chopin Society. He was the father of Polish composer Tomasz Sikorski. His output was predominantly orchestral, with several concertos (horn, flute, trumpet, bassoon, trombone) and 5 other symphonies: No. 1 (1919), No. 2 (1921), No. 3 (1955), No. 4 (1969), and No. 5 (1978-79).

Symphony No. 6 (1983)

Gurer Aykal/Presidential Symphony Orchestra, Ankara
( + T. Sikorski: La Notte)
MUZA SX 2432 (WARSAW AUTUMN non-commercial LP) (1985)

 

ALI DOGAN SINANGIL
(b. 1934, TURKISH)

Born in Konya. After beginning his musical studies at the Lycée de Galatasaray in Istanbul. He studied the scores of Olivier Messaien and the Second Viennese School before going to Germany where his attended courses given by, among others, Hermann Scherchen, Bruno Maderna and Pierre Boulez. He has composed mostly orchestral and chamber works including Symphonies Nos. 2 (1978), 3 (1983) and 4 (2002).

Symphony No. 1 (1970)

Ottavio Ziino/Istanbul State Symphony Orchestra
( + Mevlana Oratorio, Improvisation I and Suite for Strings)
GALLO GLO 836 (1995)



NIKOS SKALKOTTAS
(1904-1949, GREEK)

Born in Halkis, Evia. At the age of five he began violin lessons with his father and uncle and 5 years later entered the Athens Conservatory. After graduating, he won a scholarship to the Berlin Hochschule für Musik, where he studied the violin with Willy Hess and took some composition lessons with Paul Juon and Robert Kahn. Influenced by his friend Dimitri Mitropoulos, he gave up his promising career as a violinist in order to become a composer. Still in Berlin, he studied composition with Philip Jarnach and orchestration with Kurt Weill. Ultimately however, it was his studies with Arnold Schoenberg at the Preussische Akademie der Künste that were his most important inspirations. Back in Greece, he earned a living as a violinist while composing at a furious pace until his early death. His large catalogue includes a ballet, incidental music, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. The orchestral works include a Sinfonietta in B flat major (1948-9).

Symphony in One Movement "The Return of Odysseus" (1943-4)

Miltiades Caridis/Danish Radio Symphony Orchestra (rec. 1979)
( + Kalomiris: Symphony No. 1)
KOCH SCHWANN CD 311110 (1990)

Nikos Christodoulou/BBC Symphony Orchestra
( + 36 Greek Dances)
BIS CD-1333-4 (2 CDs) (2003)

Gunther Schuller/Tanglewood Symphony Orchestra
(included in collection: " Greek Avant-Garde Music of the 20th Century")
ETEBA BANK (5 non-commercial CDs) (1997)


Classical Symphony for Wind Orchestra, 2 Harps and 8 Double Basses (1947)

Choo Hoey /Hellenic Radio and Television National Symphony Orchestra (rec. 1975)
( + Mitropoulos: The Burial)
ERT SA / EPA 1997



LUCIJAN ŠKERJANC
(1900-1973, SLOVENE)

Born in Graz, Austria-Hungary. His initial studies were in Ljubljana and at the Prague Conservatory before attending the Vienna Academy where he took composition with Joseph Marx and then completed his studies at the Schola Cantorum under Vincent d’Indy for composition and at the Basle Conservatory under Felix Weingartner for conducting. He taught music in Ljubljana and was appointed composition teacher first at its Conservatory and then at the Ljubljana Academy of Music and also worked as a conductor. He composed orchestral, chamber, piano, choral and vocal works. His unrecorded Symphonies are: Nos. 2 (1938) and 3 (1941).

Symphony No. 1 (1931)


Uroš Lajovic/Slovene Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Solemn Overture, Dramatic Overture, 5 Lyrical Melodies for Cello and Orchestra and Harp Concerto)
SLOVENSKA FILHARMONIA SF 90036

Symphony No. 4 in B major for String Orchestra (1942-4)

En Shao/Slovene Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Mendelsohn: Symphony No. 3)
SLOVENSKA FILHARMONIA SF 994011 (1994)

Symphony No. 5 (1943)

Anton Kolar/Slovene Philharmonic Orchestra
HELODON FLP 10-008 (LP) (1970s)

Sinfonietta (Dixtuor) for Chamber Orchestra (1958)

Uroš Lajovic/RTV Ljubljana Chamber Orchestra
( + Ramovš: Nocturne, Golob: Nocturne, Merku: Slovene Rhapsody, Lebic: Tangram)
RTV LJUBLJANA LD 0544 (LP) (1980)




DANE ŠKERL
(1931-2002, SLOVENE)

Born in Ljubljana. He studied composition with Lucian Škerjanc at the Ljubljana Academy of Music and then continued his studies in Austria and at the Cologne Electronic Music Studios and elsewhere in Germany. He pursued carrers as conductor and teacher, teaching at various Ljubljana music schools as well as at the Sarajevo Music Academy before his appointment as teacher of composition at the Ljubljana Academy. He composed ballets, orchestral, chamber and vocal works. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 1 (1949), 3 (1965), 5 (Symphony Concertante) for Brass Quintet and Orchestra (1981) and 6 for Orchestra and Cello "Rhapsodic" (1987) as well as School Sinfoniettas Nos. 1 (1964), 2 for String Orchestra (1971) and 3 for Woodwinds, Brass ans Percussion (1972).

Symphony No. 2 "Monotematica" (1963)


Samo Hubad/RTV Ljubljana Symphony Orchestra
( + Šrebotnjak: Harp Concerto)
HELIDON FLP 10006 (LP) (1970s)

Symphony No. 4 "Abbreviata" (1963)

Anton Kolar/Slovene Philharmonic Orchestra
( + School Simfonietta No. 2 for Strings, Concertos for Orchestra Nos. 1 and 2 and Contrasts)
RADIO SLOVENIA Ed. DSS 200029 (c. 2000)

Symphony No. 7 "Trentana" (1992)

Loris Voltolini/Slovene Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 8, Serenade for Strings and Musica Funèbre)
RADIO SLOVENIA Ed. DSS 997010 (1997)

Symphony No. 8 "With Bells" (1994-5)

Uroš Lajovic/Slovene Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 7, Serenade for Strings and Musica Funèbre)
RADIO SLOVENIA Ed. DSS 997010 (1997)

A School Sinfonietta No. 2 (1971)

Anton Kolar/Slovene Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 4, Concertos for Orchestra Nos. 1 and 2 and Contrasts)
EDICIJ DSS 200029




STANISŁAW SKROWACZEWSKI
(b.1923, POLISH > USA)

Born in Lwów (now in Ukraine). He made his début as a pianist on Polish Radio at the age of 11 and as a conductor and composer soon thereafter. He began studies in conducting, composition, musicology and philosophy at Lwów Conservatory and did graduate studies in Kraków in 1945. After winning the Szymanowski Composition Prize, he studied composition in Paris with Nadia Boulanger as well as conducting with Paul Kletzki. He had an eminent conducting career in Poland, America and England. He composed a ballet, film and theater scores as well as orchestral and chamber works. He began composing at the age of 7 and soon had completed his Symphony No. 1, (1930). But like most of his pre-1946 work, his wartime scores have been lost. His other numbered symphonies are these: No. 2 (c. 1945), No. 3 (c. 1946) and No. 4 (1954). He has a further unrecorded symphony, the unnumbered Symphony for Strings (1947-49).

Symphony "In Memory of Ken Dayton" (2003)

Stanisław Skrowaczewski/Deutsche Radio Philharmonie, Saarbrücken Kaiserslautern
( + Music at Night and Il Piffero dela Notte)
OEHMS CLASSICS OC712 (2009)




JOSIP SLAVENSKI (ŠTOLCER)
(1896-1955, CROATIAN)

Born in Čakovec, 11 May 1896; d Belgrade, 30 Nov 1955). After preliminary musical training from his father, he entered the Budapest Conservatory where his teachers included Zoltán Kodály and Albert Siklós. After World War I. he went to study in Vitězslav Novák's master class and then at the Prague Conservatory. He then returned to Croatia and taught at the music school of the Zagreb Music Academy before moving permanently to Belgrade where he taught first at the Stanković School ofr Music and then at the music school of the Belgrade Academy where he became a professor of composition. He composed orchestral, chamber, piano, choral and vocal works.

Sinfonia Orienta (Religiophonia) for Soloists, Chorus, and Orchestra (1934)

Borivoje Simic/Aleksandra Ivanovic (alto)/Dušan Cvejic (tenor)/Lazar Ivkov (baritone)/Žarko Cvejic (bass)/Belgrade Radio Television Chorus/Belgrade Radio Television Symphony Orchestra
RTB LP 2507 (LP) (1970s)

Zhika Zdravkovich/various Croatian vocal soloists/Belgrade Philharmonic Orchestra and Chorus
DECCA LXT 5057/LONDON LL 1216 (LP) (1957)




KLEMENT SLAVICKÝ
(1910-1999, CZECH)

Born in Tovačov, Moravia. After receiving a basic musical education from his father, he studied at the Prague Conservatory with Karel Boleslav Jiřák for composition, Pavel Dědeček for conducting and and František Stupka for viola. He then attended the master classes of Josef Suk and Václav Talich. He received a conducting appointment with the Czech Radio but eventually devoted himself primarily to composing. He composed orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works as well as film scores and folksong arrangements. He earlier wrote Sinfoniettas Nos. 1 (1939-40) and 2 (1962).

Sinfonietta No. 3 (Concerto for Orchestra) (1980)

Zdeněk Košler/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + V. Neumann: Trumpet Concerto and Šestak: Actualization of an Instant—Symphonic Variations)
SUPRAPHON 11119 3209 (1982)

Libor Pešek/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Kučera: Spartacus)
SUPRAPHON 1110 3915 (LP) (1986)

Sinfonietta No. 4 for Keyboards, Strings, Percussion and Soprano "Pax Hominibus in Universo Orbi" (1984)

Jiří Bělohlávek/Brigita Sulcová (soprano)/ Rudolf Pellar (speaker)/Václav Rabas (organ)/Prague Symphony Orchestra
( + Psalms)
PANTON 81 1142-2 931 (1995)
(original LP release: PANTON 810707) (1985)

 

PAVEL SLEZAK
(b. 1941, CZECH )

He was born in Brno and graduated from the conservatory there in 1960. He then studied composition with Theodor Schaeffer and Miloslav Ištvan at the Janáček Academy in Brno (1964-69); he later taught oboe and composition in Kromeriz (1963-1991). His unrecorded Symphonies are Nos. 1 "Highland," Op. 32 (1969-89), 2 "August Day," Op. 29 (1969) and 3 "Amorosa," Op. 37 (1971).

Symphony No. 4, Op. 84 "Moravia," (2003)

Stanislav Vavrinek/Moravian Philharmonic Olomouc
( + Ruzicka: Symphony No. 4, Peska: 20 x 20, Lejsek: Preludes, and Mayer: Symphonia Islandia, movement III only)
THE MORAVIAN COMPOSERS' CLUB BRNO "LIVE" 3 (promo CD) (2006)



JAN SLIMAČ EK
(b. 1939, CZECH)

Born in Klec. He studied music at the Higher School of Music in Kromenz and then under Miloslav Kabeláč at the Prague Conservatory. Since 1981 he has been primarily an administrator in Czech composer organizations and a radio producer in Plzen.

Sinfonietta for Strings (1982)

Josef Blacky/Plzen Radio Orchestra
( + Musica per Orchestra, Quattro Intermezzi, De Amicitia, and Musica e Canto)
CESKY ROZHLAS PLZEN CR0165-2-031 (2000)




BEDŘICH SMETANA
(1824-1884, CZECH)

Born in Litomyšl, Bohemia. He was naturally gifted as a pianist and gave his first public performance at the age of six. He then studied music under Josef Proksch in Prague. He taught piano to children and starting composing instrumental and vocal pieces. He spent some time teaching and composing in Göteborg, Sweden and on his return home, his operas received performances in Prague and he was appointed principal conductor of the Royal Provincial Czech Theatre. He became one of the great men of Czech music as composer, conductor and critic. He composed 8 operas as well as orchestral, chamber and piano works. Before his death, he had begun sketching a new Symphony. His cycle of 6 symphonic poems "Má Vlast" is perhaps the most iconic work of Czech nationalist music.

Symphony in E major, Op. 6 "Festive" (1853-54, rev. 1881)

Zdeněk Košler/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Mozart: Oboe Concerto and Sinfonia Concertante, K. 297b)
SUPRAPHON SU 0180-2 031 (1996)

Theodore Kuchar/Janá·ek Philharmonic Orchestra, Ostrava
( + Má Vlast, Richard III, Haakon Jarl, Wallenstein's Camp, Shakespeare Festival March, Ceremonial Prelude in C, To Our Lasses Polka, The Peasant Woman Polka, The Bartered Bride: Overture and 3 Dances, Doktor Faust Overture, Festive Overture in C, Festive Overture in D, Prague Carnival: Introduction and Polonaise and March of the National Guard)
BRILLIANT CLASSICS 93634 (3 CDs) (2008)

Karel Šejna/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Festive Overture in D, Dvo·ák: The Cunning Peasant: Overture and Škroup: The Tinkers Overture)
SUPRAPHON SU 111914 (1996)
(original LP release: SUPRAPHON SUA ST 50875/CROSSROADS 22 16 0192) (1967)

Vladimír Válek/Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Má Vlast, Richard III, Haakon Jarl, Wallenstein's Camp, Shakespeare Festival March, Festive Overture in C, Georgina Polka, Louisina Polka and To Our Lasses Polka)
SUPRAPHON SU 3916-2 (3 CDs) (2007)

Lothar Zagrosek/ÖRF Symphony Orchestra
MARCO POLO 8.223120 (1987)





MILOŠ SOKOLA
(1913-1976, CZECH)

Born in Bučovice, Moravia. He studied the violin with Oldřich Vávra and composition with Vilem Petrželka at the Brno Conservatory before continuing his composition studies under Vitězslav Novák and Jaroslav Křička in Prague. Appointed by Václav Talich, he earned his living as a violinist in the Prague National Theatre Orchestra. This steady income enabled him to compose regularly without the need to have his works performed publicly. He produced an opera as well as orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works.

Sinfonia Variazione (1976)

Libor Pešek/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Passacaglia, Toccata and Fugue)
PANTON 81 018 (LP) (1989)




VLADIMIR SOMMER
(1921-1997, CZECH)

Born in Dolní Jiřetín, near Most. He studied at the Prague Conservatory with Bedřich Voldan for violin and Karel Janeček for composition) and at the Prague Academy of Music with Pavel Bořkovec for composition. He then worked as music editor for Czech Radio foreign broadcasts, creative secretary to the Czech Composers’ Union and as lecturer in composition at the Prague Academy of Music. He was then appointed lecturer at Prague University where he became professor of music theory. He composed orchestral, chamber, instrumental, vocal and choral works. He wrote a Symphony for Strings, Piano and Timpani (1977) and Vocal Symphony No. 2 for Mezzo, Choruses and Orchestra "Sinfonia da Requiem" (1978).

Vocal Symphony (No. 1) for Mezzo-Soprano, Reciter, Chorus and Orchestra (1958)

Igor Buketoff/Nancy Williams (mezzo)/Peter Ustinov (reciter)/Ambrosian Singers conducted by John McCarthy/London Symphony Orchestra
( + Fišer: 15 Prints after Durer's "Apocalypse" and Klusak: First Invention)
RCA LSC-3181 (LP) (1971)

Václav Neumann/Věra Soukupová (mezzo)/Ottakar Brousek (reciter)/Czech Philharmonic Chorus/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Cello Concerto and Antigone Overture)
PANTON 81 9028-2 (2000)
(original LP release: SUPRAPHON SUA ST 58651) (1965)




JÓZSEF SOPRONI
(b.1930, HUNGARIAN)

Born in Sopron. He studied composition with János Viski at the Budapest Academy of Music. He taught solfège and composition at the Budapest Conservatory and was made professor of counterpoint, solfège and theory at the Academy. He has composed an opera, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. His later Symphonies are: Nos. 4 (1994); 5 (1995) 6 (1995).

Symphony No. 1 (1975, rev. 1980)


Adam Medvecky/Budapest Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2)
HUNGAROTON SLPX 12453 (LP) (1983)

Symphony No. 2 "The Seasons" (1977)

Adam Medvecky/Budapest Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2)
HUNGAROTON SLPX 12453 (LP) (1983)

Symphony No. 3 for Female Voice, Bass- Baritone, Chorus and Orchestra "Sinfonia da Requiem" (1979-80)

Adam Medvecky/Ilona Tokody (soprano)/Gábor Németh (bass-baritone)/Budapest Symphony Orchestra
( + Cello Concerto No. 2)
HUNGAROTON SLPX 12645 (LP) (1987)




VLADIMÍR SOUKUP
(b.1930, CZECH)

Born in Prague. He started to study composition privately with Zděnek Hůla and completed his professional education at the Prague Academy of Performing Arts as a pupil of Jaroslav Řídký. He has composed operas, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 1 "Youth" (1954) and 4 "Symphony da Camera" (1969).

Symphony No. 2 (1962)

Jaromir Nohejl/Czechoslovak Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Tausinger: Sinfonia Slovacca)
PANTON 8110 0183 (LP) (1981)

Symphony No. 3 "Song of Joy" (1964)

Mario Klemens/Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Riedlbauch: Deadly Rondos)
PANTON 8110 0456 (LP) (1984)




MICHAŁ SPISAK
(1914-1965, POLISH)

Born in Dąbrowa Górnicza. He studied at the Katowice Conservatory where ihe received a diploma in the violin and composition and also took composition lessons with Kazimierz Sikorski in Warsaw. He went to Paris where he studied with Nadia Boulanger and remained there until his death but did not lose contact with musical developments in his homeland. He primarily composed orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works.

Symphonie Concertante No.1 (1947)


Kurt Sanderling/Berlin Symphony Orchestra
( + Lutos·awski: String Quartet and Go´recki: Elementi per Tre Archi)
MUZA XW 0569 (LP) (1965)


Symphonie Concertante No.2 (1956)

Stanisław Wisłocki/Warsaw National Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra
( + Concerto Giocoso)
MUZA SXL 0726 (LP) (c. 1970)




PETKO STAINOV
(1896-1977, BULGARIAN)

Born in Kazanluk. Blind since childhood, he studied music at the Sofia Institute for the Blind and was then active as a pianist in his native town. Then he studied composition with Alexander Wolf and the piano with in Ernst Münch at the Dresden Conservatory. On his return to Bulgaria he became a piano teacher at the Sofia Institute for the Blind and held various musical administrative posts. He composed orchestral and choral works.

Symphony No. 1 in A minor (1945)

Vasil Stefanov/Bulgarian Television and Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Vladigerov: Jewish Poem)
BALKANTON BCA 0324 (LP) (1960s)

Symphony No. 2 in C minor (1949)

Vladi Simeonov/Bulgarian Television and Radio Symphony Orchestra
BALKANTON BCA 11388 (LP) (1980s)




MIHAELA STĂNCULESCU-VOSGANIAN
(b.1961, ROMANIAN)

Born in Ploieşti. She studied composition with Myriam Marbe at the Music Academy of Bucharest where she became lecturer in counterpoint after having taught piano in Ploieşti. She has composed a ballet and film scores as well as orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works.

Symphony No. 1 for 3 Groups of Instruments and String Orchestra (1987)

Ludovic Bács/Romanian National Radio Chamber Orchestra
UMCR CDMVCD-1101 (1997)


Symphony No. 2 for Organ, Percussion and String Orchestra "Parallel Times" (1994-5)

Cristian Brancusi/Romanian National Radio Chamber Orchestra
(included in collection: "Romanian Women Composers")
UMCR-ADA ADD-189


Sax Symphony-Concerto (1997)

Barrie Webb/Emil Sein (sax)/Arad Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Iorgulescu: Hypostasis II, Niculescu: Chant-Son, F. Popovici: Triple Concerto and Vieru: Centaurus)
EDITURĂ MUZICALĂ EM 009 (2001)




GEORGE STEPHĂNESCU
(1843-1925, ROMANIAN)

Born in Bucharest. He studied harmony and the piano with Johann Andreas Wachmann at the Bucharest Conservatory and at the Paris Conservatory he was a pupil of Laurent Réber for harmony and Daniel François Auber and Ambrise Thomas for composition. Returning to Romania, he taught singing and opera at the Bucharest Conservatory and conducted at the Bucharest National Theatre. He composed music for the stage as well as orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. His Symphony is the first one written by a Romanian.

Symphony in A major (1869)


Emil Simon/Cluj-Napoca Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Popovici: Codex Caioni and Csisky: Songs of Bravery)
ELECTRECORD ELCD 102 (1990)
(original LP release: ELECTRECORD STM-ECE 0816) (1971)




PENCHO STOYANOV
(b.1931, BULGARIAN)

Born in Sofia, son of composer Vesselin Stoyanov. He studied the violin with Nedyalka Simeonova and composition with Parashkev Khadzhiev and Pancho Vladigerov at the Sofia State Academy He also studied at the Moscow Conservatory where his teachers included Aram Khachaturian for composition and Sergei Protopopov and in Paris with Olivier Messiaen and Tony Aubin. He became a renowned music theoretician and professor of composition. He composed orchestral, chamber, instrumental and choral works. His other Symphonies are Nos. 1 (1958), 3 "Sinfonietta" (.1971) and 4 for Bass, Speaker and Orceshtra ‘Vyara’ (Faith) (1974) as well as Symphony-Cantata for Bass, Soprano, Organ and Orchestra "Records of the Beginning" (1983) and Sinfonietta “Aquarelles from Tarnovo” (1985).

Symphony No. 2 (1971)

Vasil Stefanov/Bulgarian Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Raichev: Leipzig 33)
BALKANTON 1353 (LP) (1970s)




VESSILIN STOYANOV
(1902-1969, BULGARIAN)

Born in Shumen. He studied composition with Franz Schmidt at the Vienna Hochschule für Musik and also took private piano and orchestration lessons while in that city. After returning to Bulgaria, he first worked as a concert pianist then as a conductor and professor of composition and theory at the Sofia Conservatory. He later became director of the Conservatory and eventually director of the Sofia National Opera. He composed operas, incidental music, a ballet, film scores as well as orchestral, instrumental and vocal works

Symphony No. 1 in B minor (1962)

Vasil Stefanov/Bulgarian Television and Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Vladigerov: Jewish Poem)
BALKANTON BCA 506 (LP) (1960s)

Symphony No. 2 "The Great Preslav" (1969)

Ivan Vulpe/Bulgarian Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Vladigerov: Vardar Rhapsody, Humoresque + miscellaneous songs and arias)
BALKANTON BXA 11374-5 (2 LPs) (1980s)




EUGEN SUCHOŇ
(1908-1993, SLOVAK)

Born in Pezinok. The son of an accomplished musician and teacher, as a child he played the piano, organ and violin. He attended the Bratislava Gymnasium and at the Slovak Music School. He worked as a pianist before studying at the Bratislava Academy of Music and Drama where his teachers included Libuše Adamcová-Svobodová for piano, Frico Kafenda for composition and Jozef Vincourek for conducting. Lastly, he studied composition in Vitězslav Novák master classes at the Prague Conservatory. On returning to Bratislava, he taught the piano and theory at the Academy of Music and Drama and at the music school in Pezinok and then he became a teacher at the Bratislava State Conservatory. He composed operas, ballets, orchestral, chamber, instrumental, choral and vocal works.

Symfonietta in D major (1924, rev. 1977)

Ewald Danel /The Bohdan Warchal Slovak Chamber Orchestra
( + Serenade and Symphonic Fantasy on BACH)
SLOVAK PHILHARMONIC SLF 0020-2-131 (2008)

Symfonietta Rustica (1954-5)

Ĺudovit Rajter/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Highlanders' Suite)
SUPRAPHON SUF 20097 (LP) (1950s)

Robert Stankovsky/Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Fantasy and Burlesque for Violin and Orchestra and Symphonic Fantasy on BACH)
RADIO BRATISLAVA RB03142031 (2007)

Ladislav Slovák/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Metamorphosen)
OPUS 9110 0639 (LP) (1978)




REZSŐ SUGÁR
(1919-1988, HUNGARIAN)

Born in Budapest. He studied composition with Zoltán Kodály at the Lizst Academy of Music. After teaching at a Budapest secondary school and at the Municipal High School for Music, he was appointed to teach composition at the Budapest Conservatory and was later a professor of composition at the Lizst Academy of Music. He composed a dance-play, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. He also composed a Chamberr Symphony (1973).

Sinfonia a Variazione (1970)

András Ligeti/Budapest Symphony Orchestra
( + Concerto in Memoriam Béla Bartók and Epilogus)
HUNGAROTON HCD 31189 (1996)




JOSEF SUK
(1874-1935, CZECH)

Born in Křecoviče, Bohemia. He learned the piano, the violin and the organ from his father, then entered the Prague Conservatory where he studied the violin with Antonín Bennewitz, theory with Josef Bohuslav Foerster, Karel Knittl and Karel Stecker and from 1888 chamber music with Hanuš Wihan. After graduation, he stayed the Conservatory for special tuition in chamber music with Wihan and composition with Antonín Dvořák. He then played second violin in the Czech Quartet that gained an international reputation. He was Dvořák's favorite pupil and son-in-law. He was appointed professor of composition for the master classes of the Prague Conservatory and taught an eminent gallery of composers of the next generation. He composed orchestral, chamber, piano ad vocal works.

Symphony (No. 1) in E major, Op. 14 (1897-99)

Dalia Atlas/Philharmonia Hungarica
( + Dvo·ák: Symphonic Variations)
IMP PCD 1112 (1985)

Jiří Bělohlávek/BBC Symphony Orchestra
( + Ripening )
CHANDOS CHSA 5081 (2010)

Tomáš Netopil/Prague Symphony Orchestra
( + Dvo·ák: In Nature and Carnival Overtures)
SUPRAPHON SU 3941-2 (2008)

Václav Neumann/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1979)
( + Ostrcil: Calvary Variations)
SUPRAPHON 111964-2 (1994)
(original LP release: SUPRAPHON 1110 3390) (1984)


Symphony (No. 2) in C minor, Op. 27 "Asrael" (1905-06)

Vladimir Ashkenazy/Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra
ONDINE SACD ODE 11325 (2009)

Jiří Bělohlávek/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
CHANDOS CHAN 9640 (1998)

Jiří Bělohlávek/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 2008)
( + Britten: Sinfonia da Requiem)
SUPRAPHON SU 40952 (2 CDs) (2012)

Claus Peter Flor/Malaysian Philharmonic Orchestra
BIS SACD-1776 (2009)

Rafael Kubelik/Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (rec. 1981)
PANTON 81 1101-2011 (1994)

Sir Charles Mackerras/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
SUPRAPHON SU40432 (2011)

Václav Neumann/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + A Summer's Tale, Praga, Ripening, Fairy Tale and Epilogue)
SUPRAPHON SU 3864-2 (4 CDs) (2006)
(original release: SUPRAPHON 11104411 {2 LPs}) (1980s)

Libor Pešek/Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra
( + A Summer's Tale)
VIRGIN DE VIRGIN 628530-2 (2 CDs) (2010)
(original CD release: VIRGIN CLASSICS VC 791221-2) (1991)

Kirill Petrenko/Berlin Comic Opera Orchestra
CPO 777001-2 (2004)
Peter Schneider/Montpellier Philharmonic Orchestra
ACTES SUD AT34105 (2002)

Yevgeny Svetlanov/USSR State Symphony Orchestra
RUSSIAN DISC RD CD 11 011 (1993)

Václav Talich/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Dvo·ák: Stabat Mater)
SUPRAPHON SU 3830-2 (2 CDs) (1993)
(original release: SUPRAPHON LPM 85-7 {3 LPs}) (1952)

Vladimír Válek/Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Fantastic Scherzo)
PRAGA PR 250018 (1992)

Walter Weller/Belgian National Orchestra
FUGA LIBERA FUG 557 (2009)




STJEPAN ŠULEK
(1914-1986, CROATIAN)

Born in Zagreb. He studied the violin with Václav Huml at the Zagreb Academy of Music where he also attended Blagoje Bersa's composition class. He was appointed professor of violin and then composition at this school. He was one of the most important Croatian composition teachers and was also active as a chamber musician and conductor of the Zagreb Radio Chamber Orchestra. He composed operas, orchestral, chamber, instrumental, choral and vocal works. His unrecorded Symphonies are: Nos. 1 (1944), 2 "Eroica" (1946), 4 (1954) and 5 (1963.

Symphony No. 3 in E minor (1948)

Pavle Dešpalj/Croatian Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 8, Classical Concertos No. 1, 2 and 4)
CROATIAN RADIO CD ORF 299 (2 CDs) (2003)


Symphony No. 6 (1966)


Stjepan Šulek/Zagreb Radio Television Symphony Orchestra
JUGOTON LSY-66016 (LP) (1976)


Symphony No. 7 (1979)

Pavle Dešpalj/Zagreb Philharmonic Orchestra
JUGOTON LSY-66087 (LP) (1979)


Symphony No. 8 in F major (1981)

Pavle Dešpalj/Croatian Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 3, Classical Concertos No. 1, 2 and 4)
CROATIAN RADIO CD ORF 299 (2 CDs) (2003)


DANILO ŠVARA
(1902-1981, SLOVENE)

Born in Ricmanje, near Trieste (now in Italy). After private piano studies in Vienna, he continued studying the piano with Fritz Malata and conducting with Hermann Scherchen in Frankfurt. After a period as répétiteur and conductor at the Ljubljana Opera, he attended the Hoch Conservatory in Frankfurt where his teachers included Bernard Szekles for composition and Ludwig Rottenberg for conducting. He then worked as a music critic, conductor and teacher of conducting at the Ljubljana Academy of Music. He composed operas, ballets, orchestral, chamber and vocal works. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 2 (1935) and 3 (1950).

Symphony No. 1 (1933)


Igor Švara/Slovenian Radio Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Sinfonia da Camera in Modo Istriano)
EDICIJ DSS 200552


Sinfonia da Camera in Modo Istriano for String Orchestra (1957)

Alun Francis/Slovenian Philharmonic String Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 1)
EDICIJ DSS 200552

Danilo Švara/Slovenian Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Lajovic: Capriccio and Caprice)
HELIDON FLP 10011 (LP) (1975)





TOMAS SVOBODA
(b.1939, CZECH > USA)

Born in Paris to American parents of Czech descent. His Symphony No. 1 (1956), completed before any formal composition study, was given its première by the Prague Symphony Orchestra. He then studied percussion, composition and conducting at the Prague Conservatory and composition at the Prague Academy). He then settled in America, where he studied at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles with Ingolf Dahl and Halsey Stevens. He was appointed professor of music at Portland State University, Oregon. He has composed orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. His unrecorded Symphonies are: Nos. 2, Op.41 (1964), 3 for Organ and Orchestra, Op. 43 (1965), 5, Op. 92 "In Unison" (1978) and 6 for Clarinet and Orchestra, Op.137 as well as Sinfonietta, Op. 60 "à la Renaissance" (1972).

Symphony No. 1, Op. 20 "Of Nature" (1956, rev. 1984)


James DePriest/Oregon Symphony
( + Marimba Concerto and Overture of the Season)
ALBANY TROY 604 (2003)

Symphony No. 4, Op. 69 "Apocalyptic" (1976)

Lawrence Leighton Smith/Louisville Orchestra
( + Ex Libris and F. Goossen: Orpheus Singing)
LOUISVILLE LS 790 (LP) (1979)




BOLESŁAW SZABELSKI
(1896-1979, POLISH)

Born in Radoryz, Luków. He studied the piano and organ with Jan Łysakowski at the Warsaw Musical Society and later with Mieczysław Surzynski at the Warsaw Conservatory. After World War I, he took various posts as organist before returning to the Conservatory to study composition first with Roman Statkowski and later then with Karol Szymanowski. He taught organ and composition at the Katowice Conservatory. He composed orchestral, chamber, instrumental and choral works. His earlier unrecorded Symphonies are: Nos. 1 (1926, incomplete), 2 for Soprano, Chorus and Orchestra (1932) and 3 (1951) and there is also a Sinfonietta for Orchestra and Percussion (1946).

Symphony No. 4 (1957)

Karol Stryja/Polish Radio National Symphony Orchestra, Katowice
( + Verses for Piano and Orchestra)
MUZA SX 1828 (LP) (1980)

Symphony No. 5 for Chorus, Organ and Orchestra (1968)

Andrzej Markowski/Polish National Philharmonic Chorus/Polish National Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Toccata, Étude, Concerto Grosso, Aphorismes "9", Preludes and Flute Concerto)
OLYMPIA OCD 300 (1988)
(original LP release: MUZA SXL 0547) (c. 1970s)





FERENC SZABÓ
(1902-1969, HUNGARIAN)

Born in Budapest. He studied composition at the Budapest Academy of Music with Leo Weiner, Albert Siklós and then Zoltán Kodály. He combined his musical and Communist political interests by taking part in leading workers' choirs and writing music for performance by the masses while seeking new types of mediation between high art and popular culture. These activities forced him to emigrate through Berlin to the USSR where he became a respected figure in Soviet musical life and only returned to Hungary when the political climate changed after World War II. He composed an opera, a ballet and ilm scores as well as orchestral, chamber, instrumental, choral and vocal works. His orchestral catalogue includes a Sinfonietta for Chamber Orchestra (1935) (also arranged for a domra orchestra).

Symphony "Memento" (1952)

László Somogyi/Hungarian Radio Symphony Orchestra
QUALITON HLPX 130 (LP) (1950s)

 

WITOLD SZALONEK
(1927-2001, POLISH)

Born in Czechowice-Dziedzice. He studied at the State Higher School of Music in Katowice taking piano with Wanda Chmiełowska and composition with Bolesław Woytowicz. Then he went to Paris to continue his studies with Nadia Boulanger and began to teach composition at the Katowice School becoming head of the Department of Composition and Theory. He composed orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works.

Little Symphony B-A-C-H for Piano and Orchestra (1979-81)

Anton Nanut/Ljubljana Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Szymanski: Lux Aeterna and Dobrowolski: Music for Tape and Bass Clarinet)
MUZA SX 2430 (LP) (1982)



KAROL SZYMANOWSKI
(1882-1937, POLISH)

Born in Tymoszówka, near Kiev. His musical education first took place at home and later at a music school in nearby Elisavetgrad (now Kirowograd). Moving to Warsaw, he had private lessons in harmony with Marek Zawirski and in counterpoint and composition with Zygmunt Noskowski. He joined with other young composers Grzegorz Fitelberg, Ludomir Rózycki and Apolinary Szeluto to form the group "Young Poland" to promote their own music as well as the music of other Polish composers. He travelled widely and absorbed many exotic inflences into his music. He did some teaching and became rector of the Warsaw Conservatory. His catalogue includes operas, ballets, orchestral, chamber, instrumental, choral and vocal works. He is considered Poland's greatest composer after Chopin.

Symphony No. 1 in F minor, Op. 15 (1906-7)

Valery Gergiev/London Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2)
LSO LIVE LSO0731 (2013)

Karol Stryja/Polish State Philharmonic Orchestra, Katowice
( + Symphony No. 2)
NAXOS 8.553683 (2000)
(original CD release: MARCO POLO 8.223248) (1989)

Antoni Wit/Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 4, Concert Overture and Étude No. 3)
NAXOS 8.570722 (2009)


Symphony No. 2 in B flat major, Op. 19 (1909-10)

Leon Botstein/London Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Concert Overture, Songs of the Infatuated Muezzin and "Slopiewnie)
TELARC CD-80567 (2000)

Henryk Czyz/ Łódź Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra
( + King Roger: Roxana's Song and Etude in B flat minor)
MUZA SXL 981/AURORA AUR 5060 (LP) (1978)

Antal Dórati/Detroit Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 3 and Bartók: 2 Pictures)
DECCA 4256 252 (1990)
(original LP release: DECCA SXDL 7524/LONDON LDR 71026) (1981)

Grzegorz Fitelberg/Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 4)
MUZA L 056 (LP) (1950s)

Edward Gardner/BBC Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 4 and Concert Overture)
CHANDOS CHSA 5115 (2013)

Valery Gergiev/London Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2)
LSO LIVE LSO0731 (2013)

Okku Kamu/Copenhagen Philharmonic Orchestra
( + N.V. Bentzon: Pezzi Sinfonici and Shostakovich: The Bolt-2 Pieces)
CLASSICO CLASSCD 129 (2003)

Jacek Kasprzyk/Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 3 and 4, Harnasie,Mazurkas Nos. 1 and 2 and Variations for Piano)
EMI CLASSICS GEMINI 585539-2 (2 CDs) (2003)
(original release: HMV SLS 5242 {3 LPs}) (1982)

Witold Rowicki/Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 3 and 4, Violin Concertos Nos. 1 and 2, Concert Overture, Harnasie, Stabat Mater and Litany)
LYS LYS 554-6 (3 CDs) (2001)
(original LP release: MUZA SX 2355) (1970s)

Vassili Sinaisky/BBC Philharmonic
( + Symphony No. 4)
CHANDOS CHAN 9478 (1996)

Karol Stryja/Polish State Philharmonic Orchestra, Katowice
( + Symphony No. 1)
NAXOS 8.553683 (2000)
(original CD release: MARCO POLO 8.223248) (1989)

Takao Ukigaya/Pomeranian Philharmonic Orchestra, Bydgoscz
( + Symphony No. 4)
THOROFON CTH 2106 (1991)

Antoni Wit/Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 3)
NAXOS 8.570721 (2008)


Symphony No. 3, Op. 27 for Tenor or Soprano, Chorus and Orchestra "Song of the Night" (1914-16)

Pierre Boulez/Steve Davislim (tenor)/Wiener Singverein/ Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Violin Concerto No. 1 and interviews)
DEUTSCHE GRAMMOPHON 4778771 (2 CDs) (2010)

Tomasz Bugaj/Jadwiga Gadulanka (soprano)/Berlin Capella/Pomeranian Philharmonic Orchestra, Bydgoszcz
( + Zieritz: Zigeunerkonzert for Violin and Orchestra)
POLYPHONIA POL 63015 (LP) (1987)

Norman Del Mar/Philip Langridge (tenor)/BBC Singers/BBC Chorus/BBC Symphony Orchestra (rec. 1983)
( + Symphony No. 4 and Panufnik: Symphony No. 8)
CARLTON BBC RADIO CLASSICS IMP 9124 (1995)

Antal Dórati/Ryszard Karczykowski (tenor)/Kenneth Jewell Chorale/Detroit Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2 and Bartók: 2 Pictures)
DECCA 4256 252 (1990)
(original LP release: DECCA SXDL 7524/LONDON LDR 71026) (1981)

Vladimir Fedoseyev/Naira Asatryan (soprano)/V. Popov Choir of the Moscow Choral Academy /Tchaikovsky Symphony Orchestra
( + B. Tchaikovsky: Theme and 8 Variations and Vainberg: Symphony No. 6)
RELIEF CR 991095 (2010)

Valery Gergiev/Toby Spence (tenor)/London Symphony Chorus/London Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 4 and Stabat Mater)
LSO LIVE LSO0739 (2013)

Mariss Jansons/Rafal Bartminski (tenor)/Bavarian Radio Chorus/Bavarian Radio Symhoniy Orchestra
( + Lutosławski: Concerto for Orchestra and A. Tchaikovskyi: Symphony No. 43)
BR KLASSIK 900107 (2011)

Kazimierz Kord/Stefania Woytowicz (soprano)/Warsaw National Philharmonic Chorus/Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Stabat Mater and Litany)
SCHWANN MUSICA MUNDI AMS 3538 (LP) (1982)

Valery Polyansky/Vsevolod Grivnov (tenor)/Russian State Symphony Cappella, Russian State Symphony Orchestra
( + Stabat Mater and Kurpie Songs for Chorus)
CHANDOS CHAN 9937 (2001)

Simon Rattle/Jon Garrison (tenor)/City of Birmingham Choir/City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra
( + Litany to the Virgin Mary and Stabat Mater)
EMI GREAT RECORDINGS OF THE 20TH CENTURY 61593 (2006)
(original CD release: EMI CLASSICS CDC 5551212) (1994)

Witold Rowicki/Stefania Woytowicz (soprano)/Warsaw National Philharmonic Chorus/Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 2 and 4, Violin Concertos Nos. 1 and 2, Concert Overture, Harnasie, Stabat Mater and Litany)
LYS LYS 554-6 (3 CDs) (2001)
(original LP release: MUZA SX 0149/SUPRAPHON 1 12 1467) (1974)

Jerzy Semkow/Wiesław Ochman (tenor)/Krakow Polish Radio and Television Chorus/Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 2 and 4, Harnasie,Mazurkas Nos. 1 and 2 and Variations for Piano)
EMI CLASSICS GEMINI 585539-2 (2 CDs) (2003)
(original release: HMV SLS 5242 {3 LPs}) (1982)

Tadeusz Strugała/Stefania Woytowicz (soprano)/Krakow Radio Chorus/Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra, Krakow
( + Stabat Mater and Fragments from Poems of Jan Kasprowicz)
KOCH SCHWANN 3-1265-2 (1993)

Karol Stryja/Wiesław Ochman (tenor)/Polish National Philharmonic Chorus/Polish National Philharmonic Orchestra, Katowice
( + Symphony No. 4 and Concert Overture)
NAXOS 8.553684 (1997)
(original CD release: MARCO POLO 8.223290) (1990)

Antoni Wit/Ryszard Minkiewicz (tenor)/Warsaw Philharmonic Choir/Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2)
NAXOS 8.570721 (2008)


Symphony No. 4, Op. 60 for Piano and Orchestra "Symphonie Concertante" (1932)

Miroslav Jacek Blaszczyk/Elzbieta Wiedner-Zajac (piano)/Silesian Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra
( + Paderewski: Polish Fantasy and Chopin: Krakowiak Rondo)
DUX DUX0320 (2005)

Dennis Burkh/Mescal Wilson (piano)/Ostrava Janá·ek Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Violin Concerto No. 1)
CENTAUR RECORDS CRC 2153 (1993)

Mark Elder/Piotr Paleczny (piano)/BBC Singers/BBC Chorus/BBC Symphony Orchestra (rec. 1983)
( + Symphony No. 3 and Panufnik: Symphony No. 8)
CARLTON BBC RADIO CLASSICS IMP 9124 (1995)

Edward Gardner/Louis Lortie (piano)/BBC Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2 and Concert Overture)
CHANDOS CHSA 5115 (2013)

Valery Gergiev/Denis Matsuev (piano)/London Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 3 and Stabat Mater)
LSO LIVE LSO0739 (2013)

James Judd/Ewa Kupiec (piano)/Bamberg Symphony Orchestra
( + Lutos·awski: Piano Concerto)
KOCH 3-6414-2 (1996)

Kazimierz Kord/Felicja Blumental (piano)/ Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Katowice
(+ Variations for Piano and Chopin: Piano Concerto No. 2)
BRANA RECORDS BR0030 (2006)
(original LP release: UNICORN RHS 347) (1977)

Kazimierz Kord/Piotr Paleczny (piano)/Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Harnasie)
CD ACCORD ACD027 (1997)

Adrian Leaper/Alfredo Perl (piano)/Grand Canary Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Grieg: Piano Concerto)
ARTE NOVA 34059-2 (1993)

Simon Rattle/Leif Ove Andsnes (piano)/City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra
( + Violin Concertos Nos. 1 and 2)
EMI CLASSICS 557777-2 (2008)
(original release: EMI CLASSICS 56823-2 {2 CDs}) (1999)

Witold Rowicki/Jan Ekier (piano)/Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 3 and 4, Violin Concertos Nos. 1 and 2, Concert Overture, Harnasie, Stabat Mater and Litany)
LYS LYS 554-6 (3 CDs) (2001)
(original LP release: MUZA L 356) (1960s)

Witold Rowicki/Tadeusz Zmudziński (piano)/Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2 and Concert Overture)
MUZA/POLSKIE NAGRANIA PNCD 062 (1990)

Jerzy Semkow/Peter Paleczny (piano)/Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 2 and 3, Harnasie,Mazurkas Nos. 1 and 2 and Variations for Piano)
EMI CLASSICS GEMINI 585539-2 (2 CDs) (2003)
(original release: HMV SLS 5242 {3 LPs}) (1982)

Vassili Sinaisky/Howard Shelley (piano)/BBC Philharmonic
( + Symphony No. 2)
CHANDOS CHAN 9478 (1996)

Karol Stryja/Tadeusz Zmudzinski (piano)/Polish National Philharmonic Orchestra, Katowice
( + Symphony No. 3 and Concert Overture)
NAXOS 8.553684 (1997)
(original CD release: MARCO POLO 8.223290) (1990)

Takao Ukigaya/Bogdan Czapiewski (piano)/Pomeranian Philharmonic Orchestra, Bydgoscz
( + Symphony No. 4)
THOROFON CTH 2106 (1991)

Alfred Wallenstein/Artur Rubinstein (piano)/Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Liszt: Piano Concerto No. 1 and Falla: Nights in the Gardens of Spain)
RCA VICTOR RED SEAL 09026 63032-2 (1999)
(original LP release: RCA VICTOR LM 1744) (1955)

Alfred Walter/Bogdan Czapiewski (piano)/RTBF Symphony Orchestra
( + Bartók: Piano Concerto No. 3 and Shostakovich: 6 Songs to Poems by Marina Tsvetayeva)
PAVANE ADW 7204 (1989)

Piotr Wijatkowski/Andrzej Pikul (piano)/Lublin Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Tansman: Suite for 2 Pianos)
DUX DUX0146 (2000)

Antoni Wit/Jan Krzysztof Broja (piano)/Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 1, Concert Overture and Étude No. 3)
NAXOS 8.570722 (2009)




EMIL TABAKOV
(b.1949, BULGARIAN)

Born in Rousse. He graduated from the Sofia State Academy of Music where he studied double bass under Todor Toshev, composition under Marin Goleminov and conducting under Vladi Simeonov. He became one of Bulgaria's leading conductors and led the Rousse Philharmonic, Sofia Soloists Chamber Ensemble and the Sofia Philharmonic. He has composed ballets, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal woks. His unrecorded Symphonies are: Nos. 2 (1983), 4 (1998), 5 (2000), 6 (2002) and a Symphony Concertante for Violin, Vibraphone, Marimba, Bells and Mixed Choir (1996-7).

Symphony No. 1 (1981)

Emil Tabakov/Sofia Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Concert Piece for Orchestra)
BALKANTON BCA 11760 (LP) (1980s)

Symphony No. 3 (1987)

Emil Tabakov/Sofia Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Astral Music)
BALKANTON 030077 (1990)

 

JENŐ TAKÁCS
(1902-2005, HUNGARIAN > AUSTRIA)

Born in Cinfalva, Hungary. He studied at the Academy of Music and Performing Arts in Vienna with Joseph Marx for composition and Felix Weingartner for piano and then at the University of Vienna with Hans Gál for counterpoint and Guido Adler for music science. Leading a peripatetic life, he taught in Egypt and the Philipines where he took a keen interest in the local music, he then returned to Hungary where he taught at the music school at Szombathely and was director of the Pécs Conservatory. He then went to the United States for an appointment to the University of Cincinnat before eventually settling permanently in Austria. He composed ballets, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works.

Sinfonia Breve, Op. 108 (1981)

Janos Petro/Savaria Symphony Orchestra
( + Eine Kleine Tafelmusik, Klange und Farben, Dialoge and Trio-Rhapsodie)
AMADEO CLASSICS 423 520-1 (LP) (1987)



ALEXANDRE TANSMAN
(1897-1986, POLISH > FRANCE)

Born in Łódź. Trained at the University of Warsaw where his most prominent teacher was Pioter Rytel, he immigrated to France in 1919 and embarked on a musical career as a pianist and composer. He went to America during World War II and made his living as a conductor and composer of film scores but returned to Paris after the war. He composed prolifically and his catalogue includes operas, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal music. His unrecorded Symphony No. 1 dates from 1917.

Symphony No. 2 in A minor (1926)

Oleg Caetani/Melbourne Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 3 and Quatre Mouvements pour Orchestre)
CHANDOS CHSA 5065 (2008)

Symphony No. 3 (Symphonie Concertante for Piano Quartet and Orchestral Accompaniment) (1931)

Oleg Caetani/Wilma Smith (violin)/Katharine Brockman (viola)/David Berlin (cello)/Caroline Almonte (piano)/Melbourne Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2 and Quatre Mouvements pour Orchestre)
CHANDOS CHSA 5065 (2008)

Symphony No. 4 in C sharp minor (1939)

Oleg Caetani/Melbourne Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 5 and 6)
CHANDOS CHSA 5041 (2006)

Marc Nalecz-Niesiołowski/Białystok Podlasie Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Variations on a Theme of Frescobaldi, Nun Kommt der Heiden Heiland and 4 Polish Dances)
DUX DUX0542 (2007)

Israel Yinon/Bamberger Symphoniker
( + Arnoux: Bric à Brac)
KOCH SCHWANN 3-6558-2 (2000)

Symphony No. 5 in D minor (1942)

Oleg Caetani/Melbourne Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos.4 and 6)
CHANDOS CHSA 5041 (2006)

Meir Minsky/Czecho-Slovak State Philharmonic
( + Stèle in Memoriam d'Igor Stravinsky and Quatre Mouvements pour Orchestre)
MARCO POLO 8.223379 (1993)

Symphony No. 6 for Chorus and Orchestra "In Memoriam" (1943)

Oleg Caetani/Melbourne Chorale/Melbourne Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 4 and 5)
CHANDOS CHSA 5041 (2006)

Symphony No. 7 "Lyrique" (1944)

Oleg Caetani/Melbourne Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 8 and 9)
CHANDOS CHSA 5054 (2007)

Symphony No. 8 "Musique pour Orchestre" (1948)

Oleg Caetani/Melbourne Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 7 and 9)
CHANDOS CHSA 5054 (2007)

Rafael Kubelik/Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra (rec. 1950)
(included in collection: "Anthology of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra 1950 - 60")
Q DISC MCCL 97018 (14 CDs) (2003)

Symphony No. 9 (1957-8)

Oleg Caetani/Melbourne Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 7 and 8)
CHANDOS CHSA 5054 (2007)

Sinfonia Piccola (1952)

Oleg Caetani/Orchestra della Svizzera Italiana
( + Sinfoniettas Nos. 1 and 2 and Symphonie de Chambre)
CHANDOS CHAN 10574 (2009)

Israel Yinon/Virtuosi di Praga
( + Sinfoniettas Nos. 1 and 2 and Divertimento)
KOCH SCWANN 3-6593-2 (2000)

Symphonie de Chambre (1960)

Oleg Caetani/Orchestra della Svizzera Italiana
( + Sinfoniettas Nos. 1 and 2 and Sinfonia Piccola)
CHANDOS CHAN 10574 (2009)

Sinfonietta No. 1 (1924)

Oleg Caetani/Orchestra della Svizzera Italiana
( + Sinfonietta No. 2, Sinfonia Piccola and Symphonie de Chambre)
CHANDOS CHAN 10574 (2009)

Israel Yinon/Virtuosi di Praga
( + Sinfonia Piccola, Sinfonietta No.2 and Divertimento)
KOCH SCWANN 3-6593-2 (2000)

Sinfonietta No. 2 (1978)

Oleg Caetani/Orchestra della Svizzera Italiana
( + Sinfonietta No.1, Sinfonia Piccola and Symphonie de Chambre)
CHANDOS CHAN 10574 (2009)

Israel Yinon/Virtuosi di Praga
( + Sinfonia Piccola, Sinfonietta No.1 and Divertimento)
KOCH SCWANN 3-6593-2 (2000)




DIMITÄR TÄPKOV
(b.1929, BULGARIAN)

Born in Sofia. He studied composition at the Sofia State Academy with Marin Goleminov. He was head of the music department of Sofia Radio, general secretary of the Bulgarian Composers' Union, director of the National Opera and professor of composition at the Academy and at the University of Shumen.He composed orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. His other Symphonies are: No. 2 for Voice and Orchestra (1991), Sinfoniettas for Strings Nos. 1 (1966) and 2 (1967) and Sinfonietta (1971)).

Symphony Breve for Orchestra and Organ "1878 AD" (1978)

Vasil Stefanov/Bulgarian National Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Harp Concerto and Tanev: Divertimento-Concertante)
BALKANTON BCA 10506 (LP) (1980s)

Microsymphony for Strings (1992

Plamen Djurov/Sofia Soloists
( + Pipkov: Symphony No. 4, Nikolov: Meditations and Pironkov: Requiem for an Unknown Young Man)
GEGA GD 273 (2002)




CORNEL Ţ ĂRANU
(b.1934, ROMANIAN)

Born in Cluj. After studying composition with Sigismond Toduţă at the Dima Conservatory, Cluj, he went on to study in Paris with Olivier Messiaen and Nadia Boulanger and also attended the Darmstadt summer courses. He was appointed senior lecturer in composition at the Dima Conservatory and became conductor of the Ars Nova Ensemble. He has composed operas, film scores, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. His unrecorded Symphonies are: No. 5 (1987), Sinfonietta Giocosa (1968) and Sinfonietta for Strings "Pro Juventute" (1984), Symphony da Requiem for Choir and Orchestra (2005) and Sax Sympho for Sax Solo and Orchestra Saramandji for Orchestra (2008).

Symphony No. 1 "Sinfonia Brevis" (1962)

Mircea Cristescu/Cluj Napoca Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 2, 3 and 4)
ELECTRECORD EDC 470 (2004)

Symphony No. 2 "Aulodica" (1975-6)

Emil Simon/Cluj Napoca Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Niculescu: Symphony No. 2 and Bentoiu: Symphony No. 5)
OLYMPIA OCD 416 (1991)
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 3 and 4)
ELECTRECORD EDC 470 (2004)
(original LP release: ELECTRECORD ST-ECE 1806) (1980s)

Symphony No. 3 "Signes" (1984)

Ludovic Bács/Romanian Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 2 and 4)
ELECTRECORD EDC 470 (2004)
(original LP release: ELECTRECORD ST-ECE 3789) (1980s)

Symphony No. 4 "Ritornele" (1987)

Cristian Mandael/Cluj Napoca Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra
( + Symphonies Nos. 1, 2 and 3)
ELECTRECORD EDC 470 (2004)
(original LP release: ELECTRECORD ST-ECE 3789) (1980s)




BÉLA TARDOS
(1910-1966, HUNGARIAN)

Born in Budapest. He studied the piano at the National Conservatory in Budapest and composition with Zoltán Kodály at the Liszt Academy of Music. He earned a living in various non-musical jobs before he started conducting workers’ choirs and was held appointed as music editor of a publishing house, general manager of the National Philharmonic Concert Bureau and director of Editio Musica. As a composer, he specialized in choral music but also wrote an opera, orchestral, chamber and instrumental works.

Symphony "In Memoriam Martyrum" (1960)


Miklós Erdélyi/Hungarian Radio and Television Symphony Orcheestra
( + Horusitzky and 3 Sonnets from Shakespeare)
HUNGAROTON SLPX 1190 (LP) (1960s)




JAN TAUSINGER
(1921-1980, CZECH)

Born in Piatra Neamt, Romania. He studied composition at the Bucharest Conservatory with Dimitrie Cuclin, Mihail Hora and Alfred Mendelssohn then after settling in Czechoslovakia, he continued his studies with Alois Hába and Pavel Bořkovec at the Prague Academy. He conducted the radio orchestras in Bucharest, Ostrava and Plzeň and then was head of what would become the Ostrava Conservatory. Afterwards, he held other admimistative positions. He composed an opera, ballet, orchestra, chamber, keyboard and vocal works. His orchestral catalogue also includes Symphony No. 1 "Osvobození" (The Liberation) (1950–52).

Sinfonia Bohemica for Baritone, Male Chorus, Harpsichord, Trumpet and Orchestra
(1973-5)


Jiří Bělohlávek/Prague Philharmonic Chorus/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Hanuš: Prague Nocturnes)
PANTON 11 0541 (LP) (1976)

Otakar Trhlik/Ostrava Philharmonic Chorus/Janacek Philharmonic, Ostrava
( +L. Kubik: PIano Concerto, and Kohoutek: Sunshine)
PANTON 11 0628 (LP) (1976)

Sinfonia Slovacca (1979)

Ladislav Slovák/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Soukup: Symphony No. 2)
PANTON 8110 0183 (LP) (1981)

 

CORNELIA TĂUTU
(b. 1938, ROMANIAN)


Born in Odorhei. She studied with Ion Dumitrescu, Nicolae Buicliu, Myriam Marbe, Aurel Stroe, Tudor Ciortea, and Stefan Niculescu at the Bucharest Conservatory then spent a year at Long Island University studying composition with Raoul Pleskow. She has worked on Romanian radio musical programs. Her music is highly advanced and she has an unrecorded Sinfonietta (1986).

Symphony No. 1 "1907" (1987)

Ludovic Baci/Romanian Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Inventions, Engravings and Dice)
ELECTRECORD ST-ECE 03735 (LP) (c. 1989)




ALEKSANDAR TEKELIEV
(b.1942, BULGARIAN)

Born in Svilengrad. At the Sofia State Music Academy, he studied composition with Vesselin Stoyanov and then continued his studies in composition and orchestration in Budapest with Attila Bozay and in Paris with Michel Filippo. He worked as chief editor at the Bulgarian National Radio and became professor of composition and orchestration at the Sofia State Academy of Music. He composed ballets, an opera, orchestral, chamber and instrumental works. His output also includes Chamber Symphony No. 3 for 12 Cellos "De Profundis Spiritus" (1994).

Chamber Symphony No. 1 for String Orchestra (1973)

Stoyan Angelov/Sofia Chamber Orchestra
( + Tapkov: 6 Bagatelles, Abrashev: Concerto for Two Pianos and String Orchestra and Kostov: Poem)
BALKANTON BCA 1714 (LP) (1970s)

Chamber Symphony No 2 for String Orchestra "In Memory of My Mother" (1975)

Kamen Goleminov/Sofia Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Disturbing Ways)
BALKANTON BCA 10210 (LP) (1980s)

Symphony No. 4 "Symphony Requiem" for Female Folk Choir and Orchestra (2002)

Naiden Todorov/Cosmic VoicesFemale Folk Choir/
Bulgarian National Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Roots and Symphonic Suite: Happy Birthday)
GEGA GD 315 (2007)




JIŘÍ TEML
(b.1935, CZECH)

Born in Vimperk. He studied theory and composition with Bohumil Dušek and Jiří Jaroch. He began his musical career as a producer and head of music at Plzeň Radio. He joined Czech Radio in Prague as producer of classical music programmes. He has composed children's operas as well as orchestral, chamber and vocal works. He composed his Symphony No. 3 "Kafka" in 1994.

Symphony No.1 for Strings, Harp and Timpani "People and Sources" (1976)


Josef Hrnčíř/Dagmar Platinová (harp)/Ivo Kieslich (timpani)/Czechoslovak Radio Symphony Orchestra, Prague
( + Kucera: Amoroso and Havelka: Nonet)
SUPRAPHON 119 2239 (LP) (1977)

Symphony No.2 "The War with the Newts" (1987)

Jiří Malát/Czechoslovak Radio Symphony Orchestra, Prague
( + Kvech: R.U.R. and Kalabis: Diptych for Strings)
PANTON 810838 (LP) (1988)




EDE TERÉNYI (EDUARD TERÉNY)
(b.1935, ROMANIAN)

Born in Tîrgu-Mures. He studied the piano at the Music Lyceum in Tîrgu-Mures with Jósef Trózne and then took composition with Gabor Jodál at the Dima Conservatory in Cluj. He then was a tutor, lecturer and professor at this school for over 5 decades. He has concentrated on composition throughout his musical career. He composed orchestral, chamber, instrumental, vocal and choral works. His other Symphonies are: "Brâncusiana" (1965), Symphony for 2 Percussionists (1978, rev. 2007), "Space and Light" (1988), "Mountains, Forests, Dreams" (1988), "Legend of Transylvania" (1993) and " 5 Kodály Portraits" (1997) and a series of Chamber Symphonies for Strings with the titles: Music in C minor (1979), "Tinódi's World (1983), Gershwin Serenades (1986), "Media Paraphrases" (1990-2), "The Seven Towered Castle" for Violin and Chamber Orchestra (1993), "Depart: In Memoriam Benjamin Britten" (1996), "Liturgy of Green Forests" (1998) and "Codex Books from Transylvania" (1998).

Chamber Symphony No. 2 for String Orchestra "In Memoriam Valentin Bakfark" (1978)

Gyula Hamza/Tirgu-Mures Philharmonic Chamber
( + Toduţă: Stampe and Boldizsar: Patru Piese)
ELECTRECORD ST-ECE 1897 (LP) (1970s)




MIKIS THEODORAKIS
(b.1925, GREEK)

Born in Chios. He first studied in Athens with Philoktitis Economides and later at the Paris Conservatory with Olivier Messiaen and Eugène Bigot. In Paris, he wrote music for film and collaborated with the Royal Ballet, the Covent Garden and the Stuttgart Ballet. He founded the Athens Little Orchestra and the Piraeus Musical Organization. His life has been divided between composition and political activism. He has composed operas, ballets, incidental music, orchestral, vocal, choral and chamber works as well as film scores and popular music. There is no available information about his 5th and 6th Symphonies.

Symphony No. 1 (1953)

Mikis Theodorakis/Piraeus Symphony Orchestra
DELTA TS 5001 (LP) (1966)

Mikis Theodorakis/ St. Petersburg State Academic Capella Symphony Orchestra
( + Adagio for Flute, Clarinet, Trumpet and String Orchestra)
INTUITION INT 3176-2 (1997)


Symphony No. 2 for Children's Choir, Piano and Orchestra "The Song of the Earth"
(1980-81)


Mikis Theodorakis/Cyprien Katsaris (piano)/Children's Choir/Luxembourg Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Piano Concerto No. 1 and Suite No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra)
PIANO 21 P21 027-A (2 CDs) (2007)


Symphony No. 3 for Soprano, Chorus and Orchestra (1984)

Heinz Rogner/Els Bolkestein (soprano)/Chorus and Orchestra of the Komischen Opera, Berlin
ETERNA 827739 (LP) (1981)


Symphony No. 4 for Soprano, Mezzo, Narrator, Chorus and Orchestra without Strings "Symphony of Choral Odes" (1986-7)

Loukas Karytinos/Aleka Drakopoulu (soprano)/Kiki Morfaniou (mezzo)/ Leda Tassopoulu (narrator)/Athens Philharmonia Chorus/Orchestra Athens Philharmonia Orchestra
ADDA CD 581013 (1987)



Symphony No. 7 for Soprano, Mezzo, Tenor, Bass, Chorus and Orchestra "Spring Symphony" (1983)


Herbert Kegel/Kari Lövaas (soprano)/Violetta Madjarova (mezzo)/Sergei Larin (tenor)/Gunter Emmerlich (bass)/Prague Radio Chorus and Children's Chorus/Lithuanian State Philharmonic Chorus/Dresden Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1987)
INTUITION INT 3131-2 (1994)

Dmitr Kitayenko/Jolanta Ciurilaite (soprano)/Austa Stasiounaite (mezzo)/Sergei Larin (tenor)/ Vladimir Proudnikov (bass)/Latvian State Academic Chorus/Kaunus State Chorus /Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra
CHANT DU MONDE LDC 278.787 (1987)
(original LP release: MELODIYA S10 21685-6) (1984)


Sinfonietta for Piano, Flute and String Orchestra "Symphonietta" (1947)

Mikis Theodorakis/Henning Schmiedt (piano)/International Frankfurt Chamber Orchestra
( + State of Siege: Film Suite)
INTUITION INT 3259-2 (1999)




VLADIMIR TICHY
(b.1946, CZECH)

He studied composition at the Prague Conservatory, continued composition studies with Jiří Pauer at the Academy of Music and Arts in Prague and then took a course in Siena under Franco Donatoni. He was manager of sound archives at the Academy of Music and Arts and taught theoretical subjects at the Conservatory for Young People with Impaired Vision and later taught composition analysis at the Academy of Music and Arts.

Symphony No. 2 for 15 Strings (1980)


Jiří Malát/Suk Chamber Orchestra
( + Kvech: String Quartet No.4 and Jerábek: Cello Sonata)
PANTON 8111 0380 (1984)


Symphony No. 3 (1984)

Vladimir Nohejl/Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra, Olomouc
( + Hlobil: Cello Concerto)
PANTON 8110 0442 (1985)


 

SIGISMUND TODUŢĂ
(1908-1991, ROMANIAN)

Born in Simeria. He studied harmony and counterpoint with Marţian Negrea and the piano with Ecaterina Fotino-Negru at the Dima Conservatory, Cluj. He continued his studies in Rome at the Accademia di Santa Cecilia as a pupil of Ildebrando Pizzetti for composition and Alfredo Casella for piano and also took a doctorate in musicology at the Pontificio Istituto di Musica Sacra. Back in Romania, he was appointed teacher of theory, harmony and composition at the Cluj Conservatory where he became rector and also produced a number of important musicological works. His catalogue contains operas, orchestral, chamber, instrumental, choral and vocal works. His unrecorded Symphonies are Nos. 1 (1954), 2 for Organ and Orchestra "In Memoria lui Georges Enescu" (1956), 3 "Ovid" (1957) and 4 (1961) as well as a Sinfonietta (1977).

Symphony No. 5 (1976-7)

Emil Simon/Cluj-Napoca Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Concerto for Strings No. 2)
ELECTRECORD STM-ECE 01380 (LP) (1965-74)


 

VÁCLAV JAN TOMÁŠEK
(1774-1850, CZECH)

Born in Skuteč, Bohemia. Largely self-taught in music, Tomášek pursued his studies in his spare time. He worked as a piano teacher in Prague and taught a large number of important future composrrs. He is considered the dominant musical figure in Prague during the first half of the 19th century. Most of his compositions were for the piano but he also wrote orchestral, chamber and vocal works. His other Symphonies are in C major (1801) and E-flat major (1805).

Symphony in D major, Op. 30 (1807)

Vladmir Válek/Dvoŕák Chamber Orchestra
( + Vranicky: Aphrodite Symphony)
SUPRAPHON CO-2438 (1988)
(original LP release: SUPRAPHON 11103910) (1984)




VITOMIR-VOJA TRIFUNOVIĆ
(1916-2007, SERBIAN)

Born in Bukovica, near Kraljevo. He graduated from the composition department at the Belgrade Music Academy where his teachers were Stanojlo Rajičič, Josip Slavenski and Milenko Živković. After graduation he devoted some time to pedegogic work and founded and headed a music school. He has also been been a music editor and advisor at Radio Belgrade. He has composed orchestral,,chamber and vocal works. He composed a Symphony No. 3 "In Memory of Dmitri Shostakovich" (1986).

Symphony No. 1 (1979)

Mladen Jagust/Belgrade Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Violin Concerto)
JUGOTON LSY-6642 (LP) (1981)

Symphony No. 2 (1983)

Vanco Cavdarski/Belgrade Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Concertante Music and Magnifico Overture)
RTB 2130904 (LP) (1986)




VÁCLAV TROJAN
(1907-1983, CZECH)

Born in Plzeň. At the Prague Conservatory, he studied the organ with Bedřich Wiedermann, conducting with Otakar Ostrčil and Pavel Dědeček and then continued his studies in the composition master classes of Josef Suk and Vitězslav Novák. He also attended Alois Hába’s classes in quarter-tone and sixth-tone music. He worked as a music teacher, music manager for Prague Radio (1937–45), composer for the State Cartoon Film Company and lecturer in theater and film music at the Prague Academy. Most of his music is for the stage and for films but he also composed some orchestral and chamber works.

Sinfonietta Armoniosa for Chamber Orchestra (1970)

Prague Chamber Orchestra
( + Krejcí: Nonet-Divertimento)
PANTON 22 0348 (LP) (1972)




TSVETAN TSVETANOV
(1931-1982, BULGARIAN)

Born in Sofia. He studied composition with Pancho Vladigerov and Parashkev Khadzhiev at the Bulgarian State Conservatory in Sofia. He then taught harmony at the Conservatory becoming lecturer and then professor. He composed operas, ballets, incidental music and film scores as well as orchestral chamber and vocal works.

Symphony No. 1 "Revolutionary" (1965)

Ivan Vulpe/Burgas Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Ballad about Botev's Kiss, Prayer from Botev Peak and Back to the Feat)
BALKANTON BCA 1300/427 (LP) (c. 1980)

Symphony No. 2 (1969)

Vasil Stefanov/Bulgarian Television and Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Kyurchiysky: Symphony-Requiem)
BALKANTON BCA 1211 (LP) (1970s)

Symphony No. 3 "1923" (1972)

Vasil Stefanov/Bulgarian Television and Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + The Ladder)
BALKANTON BCA 1572 (LP) (1970s)




ZBIGNIEW TURSKI
(1908-1979, POLISH)

Born in Konstancin, near Warsaw. He studied composition with Piotr Rytel and conducting with Walerian Bierdiajew at the Warsaw Academy. He was a music producer at Polish Radio in Warsaw and afterwards developed a career as a conductor. He composed operas, ballets, orchestral, chamber and vocal works. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 1 "Sinfonia da Camera" (1947) and 3 (1955).

Symphony No. 2 "Sinfonia Olimpica" (1948)

Andrzej Markowski/Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Violin Concerto No. 1 and Malawski: Overture))
OLYMPIA OCD 327 (1990)
(original LP release: MUZA SXL 0486) (1968)

 

ROMUALD TWARDOWSKI
(b.1930, POLISH)

Born in Vilnius, Lithuania. He studied at the State Conservatory of the Lithuanian Republic in Vilnius and continued his compositional studies at the State Higher School of Music in Warsaw with Bolesław Woytowicz. After graduating,, he studied for one year with Nadia Boulanger in Paris. He later taught at the Warsaw Academy of Music. His compositions include operas, ballets, orchestral, chamber and vocal works.

Little Symphony for Piano, Strings and Percussion (1959)

Andrzej Gebski/Edward Wolanin (piano)/Zenon Brzewski Warsaw String Orchestra
( + Tryptych of the Virgin Mary, Concerto Breve, Old Polish Concerto, Serenade and Oberek)
ACTE PRÉAMBLE AP0120 (2007)




VIKTOR ULLMANN
(1898-1944, CZECH)

Born in Teschen, Austria-Hungary (now Český Těšín, Czech Republic). He had studied theory with Josef Polnauer and also piano with Eduard Steuermann before he entered Vienna University to study law. He then enrolled in Arnold Schoenberg's composition seminar. At Schoenverg's recommendation, he worked on the committee of the Verein für Musikalische Privataufführungen but then moved to Prague where he joined the music staff of the Neues Deutsches Theater under Alexander von Zemlinsky, becoming chorus master, répétiteur and conductor. He composed prolifically up until his premature death in the Holocaust. His surviving catalogue includes, operas, orchestral,,chamber, instrumental, choral and vocal works. He composed a Concerto for Orchestra (Symphonietta), Op. 4 (1928), but that work is lost.

Symphony No. 1 in D minor "Von Meiner Jugend" (reconstructed in part by B. Wulff, 1944/1995)


Gerd Albrecht/Brussels Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2, Der Zerbrochene Krug: Overture, Don Quixote and Variations and Fugue on a Hebrew Folksong)
GLOSSA 922208 (2010)

James Conlon/Cologne Gürzenich Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 2, Don Quixote and 6 Lieder)
CAPRICCIO RECORDS 67017 (2003)


Symphony No. 2 in D major (reconstructed in part by B. Wulff, 1944/1989) (based on his Piano Sonata No. 7)

Gerd Albrecht/Brussels Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 1, Der Zerbrochene Krug: Overture, Don Quixote and Variations and Fugue on a Hebrew Folksong)
GLOSSA GDSA 922208 (2010)

Gerd Albrecht/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Haas: Study for Strings, Klein: Partita and Schulhoff: Symphony No.2)
ORFEO C337941A (1994)

James Conlon/Cologne Gürzenich Orchestra
( + Symphony No. 1, Don Quixote and 6 Lieder)
CAPRICCIO RECORDS 67017 (2003)

Israel Yinon/Brunn State Philharmonic
( + Piano Concerto and Variations, Fantasy, and Double Fugue for Piano)
BAYER RECORDS BR 100 228 (1993)





BORIS ULRICH
(1931-1983, CROATIAN)

Born in Zagreb. He studied art history and music in Zagreb. He was an engineer at Radio Television Zagreb and also performed as a pianist.

Sinfonia Vespro for Chamber Group and Orchestra (1974)

Josef Daniel/Acezantes/Zagreb Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Echo, Choral and Scena)
JUGOTON LSY 61217 (LP) (1970s)




MILOŠ VACEK
(1928-2012, CZECH)

Born in Horní Rove, near Pardubice. He studied the organ at the Prague Conservatory and composition with František Pícha and Jaroslav Řídký at the Prague Academy of Musical Arts . He has worked primarily as a freelance composer. His compositions include operas, ballets, film scores, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works.

Symphony (No. 1) "May" (1974)


Josef Hrnčíř/Czechoslovak Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Hlobil: Path of the Living and Sternwald: Homecoming)
PANTON 11 0551 (LP) (1975)

Symphony No. 2 (1986)

Jaromir Nohejl/Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra, Olomouc
( + Podešva: Symphony No. 8)
PANTON 81 0480 (LP) (1988)




DALIBOR VAČKÁŘ
(1906-1984, CZECH)

Born in Korčula, Croatia, the son of composer-conductor Václav Vackár (1881-1954)). He studied the violin with Rudolf Reissig and composition with Otakar Šín at the Prague Conservatory and then took that school's master classes in violin with Karel Hoffmann and composition with Josef Suk. Afterwards, he played the violin in the Prague Radio Orchestra and worked as a film scenario writer. He then devoted himself almost exclusively to composing. He composed ballets and film scores as well as orchestral , chamber, instrumental and vocal works. His other Symphonies are Nos. 1 "Optimistic" (1941), 2 for Alto, Chorus and Orchestra "The Chosen Land" (1947), 4 "Peace" (1949-50) and 5 "Pro Juventute" (1983) and Symfonietta No. (1) for Strings, Horn, Timpani and Piano (1947).

Symphony No. 3 in E minor "Smoking Symphony" (1947-8)

Karel Ančerl/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1962)
( + Concerto for String Quartet, Concerto for Harpsichord, Wind Instruments and Percussion, Appelatio for Orchestra and Choir, Monograms, Extempore 84, Songs for Sewing Time, A Prayer for a Dead Soldier, Unfold Oh Flower and A Toast to Friendship)
CZECH RADIO CR0353201-2 (2 CDs) (2007)


Sinfonietta No. 2 "Jubilee" (1983)

Jan Hališka/Gottwaldov State Symphony
( + Hanuš: Passacaglia Concertante, and Jirásek: Dramatic Etudes)
PANTON 8110 0630 (LP) (1986)



JÁNOS VAJDA
(b.1949, HUNGARIAN)

Born in Miskolc. At the Liszt Academy of Music, Budapest he studied choral conducting with István Párkai and composition with Emil Petrovics. He worked as a répétiteur for the Hungarian Radio and Television Chorus and then enrolled at the Amsterdam's Sweelinck Conservatory to continue his studies in composition. He became a professor at the Budapest Academy. His catalogue includes operas, ballets, orchestral, chamber and vocal works. Among his other orchestral works are a Retrograde Symphony (19800 and a Chamber Symphony for String Orchestra (2001).

Sinfonietta for String Orchestra (2002)


Imre Kollár/Debrecen Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Titanic and Once or Never)
HUNGAROTON HCD 32336 (2005)




JIŘÍ VÁLEK
(1923-2005, CZECH)

Born in Prague. He studied composition in Jaroslav Ř ídký's master class at the Prague Conservatory. He then privately studied philosophy, aesthetics, the history of music and music theory. He became creative secretary of the newly established Union of Czechoslovak Composers, was a senior staff member of the Panton publishing house and then became the Artistic Director of Supraphon. Academically, he was professor of composition at Prague Conservatory and then associate professor of composition at the Prague Academy of Music Arts. His enormous catalogue of compositions includes music dramas, oychestral, chamber and pianoworks but his cycle of Symphonies forms the center of his output. The unrecoded ones are: Nos. 1 for Trumpet, Piano and Orchestra "Year 1948" (1948), 2 for Chamber Orchestra "Classical" (second version for 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes and Chamber String Orchestra {1957}), 3 for Soprano and Tenor Saxophone and Orchestra "Romantic" (1957-63), 4 for Mezzo Soprano, Baritone, Wind Orchestra, Piano and Percussion Instruments "Dialogues with an Inner Voice" (1964-65), 15 (Symphony-Oratorio) tribute to Czech patriot for Baritone, Bass, Women' s Choir and Orchestra "Sarcastic" (1986) and 16 for Bass-Baritone and Orchestra "Neter" (1987) and also Symfonietta for Large Orchestra (1945).

Symphony No. 5 "Guernica" (1968)

Eduard Fischer/Czechoslovak Radio Symphony Orchestra, Prague
( + K. Reiner: Concertante Suite, Sixta: Asynchronia, Hrusovsky: Musica Nocturna, Dvorácek: Quattro Episodi, Režác: Piano Concerto, Kardoš: Partita and Grešak: Ameby)
SUPRAPHON 1101601 (3 LPs) (1975)

Symphony No. 6 for Flute, Piano, Percussion Ensemble and Chamber Orchestra "Ekpyrosis" (1969)

Eduard Fischer/Jiri´ Válek (flute)/Prague Chamber Soloists
( + Pauer: Intrada and Initials)
PANTON 11 0642 (LP) (1977)

Symphony No. 7 for Chamber Orchestra, Piano and Percussion Ensemble "Pompeian Frescoes" (1970)

Otakar Trhlik/Janá·ek Philharmonic, Ostrava
( + Bárta: Symphony No. 3)
PANTON 11 0393 (LP) (1973)


Symphony No. 8 for Soprano and Orchestra "Hic Sunt Homines" (1971)

Otakar Trhlík/Jarmila Vrchotová-Patová (soprano)/Janá·ek Philharmonic, Ostrava
( + Symphony No. 9)
SUPRAPHON 110 1569 (LP) (1974)


Symphony No. 9 (Triple Concerto) for Violin, Viola, Cello and String Orchestra "Renaissance" (1971)

Eduard Fischer/Jiri Tomášek (violin)/Hubert Simaček (viola)/Vacal Bernácek (cello)/Prague Chamber Soloists
( + Symphony No. 8)
SUPRAPHON 110 1569 (LP) (1974)


Symphony No. 10 (Double Concerto) for Violin, Piano and Orchestra "Baroque" (1973)

Vladimir Valek/Ji·í Tomášek (violin)/Josef Ružicka (piano)/Dvo·ák Orchestra
( + Hlobil: Symphony No. 7 and Seidel: Prelude Giocosa)
PANTON 119 1577 (LP) (1974)

Vladimir Valek/Ji·í Tomášek (violin)/Josef Ružicka (piano)/Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Flosman: Violin Concerto No. 2)
SUPRAPHON 110 1750 (LP) (1975)


Symphony No. 11 for Violin, Viola, Piano, Wind Quintet and Orchestra "Revolutionary" (1974)

Eduard Fischer/Ji·í Tomášek (violin)/Hubert Simaček (viola)/Josef Ružicka (piano)/Czechoslovak Radio Symphony Orchestra, Prague
( + Šestak: Concerto for String Orchestra)
PANTON 110553 (LP) (1975)


Symphony No. 12 (Symphony-Concerto for Violin, Viola and Orchestra "Shakespearean" (1975)

Libor Pešek/Ji·í Tomášek (violin)/Hubert Simaček (viola)/Czechoslovak Radio Symphony Orchestra, Prague
( + Rychlik: Wind Octet)
PANTON 81100349 (LP) (1976)


Symphony No. 13 for Mixed Choir and Orchestra "Gothic" (1978)

Eduard Fischer/Prague Radio Chorus/Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Podešva: Symphony No. 4)
SUPRAPHON 1110 3399 (LP) (1984)


Symphony No. 14 for 2 Pianos and Orchestra "Trionfale" (1983)

Libor Pešek/Hana Dvo·áková and Stanislav Bogunia (pianos)/Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Kvech: Symphony in E flat)
PANTON 81100517 (LP) (1985)




ZENO VANCEA
(1900-1990, ROMANIAN)

Born in Bocşa-Vasiova. He studied music at Lugoj and at the Dima Conservatories of Cluj with Augustin Bena and then composition with Ernst Kanitz at Vienna's Neues Wiener Konservatorium. He had an eminent academic career, first as professor of music history, theory and harmony and and then director at the Tîrgu Mureş Conservatory, then professor of counterpoint and music history at the Timişoara Conservatory and subsequently professor of music history and counterpoint at the Bucharest Conservatory. He also founded and directed the Tîrgu Mureş State Philharmonic; he was secretary and vice-chairman of the Romanian Composers’ Union and editor-in-chief of the Bucharest journal Muzica.He composed a ballet, orchestral, chamber, choral and vocal works as well as film scores and incidental music. His Sinfonietta (No.1) is from 1948.

Sinfonetta No. 2 (1967)

Emanuel Elenescu/Romanian Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + String Quartet No. 5)
ELECTRECORD ST-ECE 1077 (LP) (1970s)




SÁNDOR VERESS
(1907-1992, HUNGARIAN > SWITZERLAND)


Born in Kolozsvár, Hungary (now Cluj, Romania). He attended the Budapest Academy of Music where his teachers included Zoltán Kodály for composition and Béla Bartók for piano and also studied with László Lajtha at the Hungarian Ethnographical Museum. After working with Bartók at the ethnographic collection of the Budapest Academy of Sciences, he taught at the Budapest Academy of Music. He iemigrated to Switzerland in 1949 where he taught at the Bern Conservatory and the University of Bern and also was a guest lecturer in America. He composed in most genres including opera, ballet, orchestral, chamber and vocal works. Some of his other orchestral pieces are a Concertos for Violin, Piano and Clarinet, "Hommage à Paul Klee" and "Musica Ungaresca."

Symphony No. 1 in C major "Hungarian Greetings on the 2600th anniversary of the Japanese Dynasty" (1940)

Kunihiko Hashimoto/Symphony Orchestra for the Celebration of Imperial 2600 (rec. 1940)
( + Pizzetti: Symphony in A)
ROHM MUSIC FOUNDATION CD 3 (2002)
(from JAPENESE POLYDOR 78s)

Támas Pál/Savaria Symphony Orchestra
( + Dances for String Orchestra Nos 1 - 4 and and Clarinet Concerto)
HUNGAROTON HCD 32118 (2004)

Symphony No. 2 "Sinfonia Minneapolitana" (1954)

János Meszaros/North Hungarian Symphony Orchestra Miskolc
( + Katica from Térszil)
MGB CD 6130 (1996)




ANATOL VIERU
(1926-1998, ROMANIAN)

Born in Iaşi. After attending the Bucharest Conservatory, where his teachers included Paul Constantinescu, Theodor Rogalski, Constantin Silvestri and Wilhelm Klepper, he entered the Moscow Conservatory as a pupil of Aram Khachaturian. He finished his musical studies at the Dima Conservatory of of Cluj-Napoca. He worked as a conductor at the Bucharest National Theatre and then chief editor of Muzica, the journal of the Romanian Composers' Union. He was appointed a teacher of orchestration at the Bucharest Conservatory where he also taught composition. His activities as a lecturer took him to Western Europe, Israel and America. He composed operas and film scores as well as orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. His unrecored Symphonies are: 6 "Exodus" (1989) and 7 "The Year of the Silent Sun" (1992–3) as well as Simfonia de Camera (1962), Sinfonietta (1975) and Sinfonia Concertante for Cello and Orchestra (1987).

Symphony #1 "Ode to Silence" (1966)

Ludovic Bács/Romanian Radio and Television Symphony
( + Narration II)
ELECTRECORD ST-CS 0199 (LP) (1987)


Symphony No. 2 (1973)


Ludovic Bács/Romanian Radio and Television Symphony
( + Symphony No. 4 and Psalm)
OLYMPIA OCD 449 (1995)
(original LP release: ELECTRECORD ST-ECE 3973) (1979)

Symphony No. 3 "Earthquake Symphony" (1978)

Anatol Vieru/Romanian Radio and Television Symphony
( + Taragot and Joseph and His Brothers)
OLYMPIA OCD 419 (1995)
(original LP release: ELECTRECORD ST-ECE 3973) (1979)

Symphony No. 4 (1982)

Emil Simon/Cluj-Napoca Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra (rec. 1983)
( + Symphony No. 2 and Psalm)
OLYMPIA OCD 449 (1995)

Symphony No. 5 for Chorus and Orchestra (1984-5)

Ludovic Bács/Romanian Radio Chorus/Romanian Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Concerto for Violin, Cella and Orchestra)
OLYMPIA OCD 409 (1995)
(original LP release: ELECTRECORD ST-ECE 3247) (1986)





DEMIS VISVIKIS
(b.1951, GREEK)

Born in Cairo, Egypt to Greek parents. He started learning the piano with his father and went on to study at the National Conservatory in Athens. He settled in Paris where he explored various types of experimental music. He started studying harmony, counterpoint, fugue, orchestration and composition with Julien Falk at the Paris Conservatory where he also studied conducting with Georges Tzipine and had further piano instruction as well. He has composed orchestral, chamber and piano works. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 1 "Chants des Espaces Stellaires" (1992-4) and 3 "The Fountains of Depth" (2006).

Symphony No. 2 "The Way to Victory" (2002)

Alkis Panayotopoulos/Bulgarian National Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Raftopoulos: Cries of the Night, Travlos: Old Tower and Drelas: I Walk)
LYRA CD 1043 (2004)




PANCHO VLADIGEROV
(1899-1978, BULGARIAN)

Born in Zürich to Bulgarian parents. He studied theory and the piano as well as composition with Dobri Hristov in Sofia before going to Berlin for private lessons in composition with Paul Juon and then at the Staatliche Akademische Hochschule für Musik in Berlin, he studied composition with Friedrich Gernsheim and Georg Schumann as well as the with Leonid Kreutzer at the Akademie der Künste. He worked for Max Reinhardt at the Deutsches Theater in Berlin as a composer and conductor before returning to Sofia where he was appointed professor of piano, chamber music and composition at the State Academy of Music. He composed an opera, ballet, incidental music, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. Practically all of his music has been recorded.

Symphony No. 1 in D minor, Op. 33 (1939)

Alexander Vladigerov/Bulgarian National Radio Symphony Orchestra
(included in collection: "Pancho Vladigerov - The Complete Works, Volume III)
BALKANTON BCA 10840-46 (7 LPs) (1980s)


Symphony No. 2 in B flat major for String Orchestra, Op. 44 "May" (1949)

Alexander Vladigerov/Bulgarian National Radio Symphony Orchestra
(included in collection: "Pancho Vladigerov - The Complete Works, Volume III)
BALKANTON BCA 11148-54 (7 LPs) (1980s)

Alexander Vladigerov/Rousse Philharmonic Orchestra
BALKANTON BCA 551 (LP) (1960s)




JAN VÁCLAV VOŘÍŠEK
(1791-1825, CZECH)

Born in Vamberk, Bohemia. His father taught him music and he also had lessons in piano and composition from Václav Jan Tomášek. Working in Vienna, he became friends with composers Louis Spohr, Ignaz Moscheles, Johann Nepomuk Hummel and especially Franz Schubert and was a conductor of the Friends of Music Society. He became an esteemed composer of music for orchestra, voice and piano and is often considered the first Czech romantic composer.

Symphony in D major, Op. 24 (1821)

Petr Altrichter/Southwest German Radio Orchestra, Baden-Baden
( + Lukaš: Piano Concerto No. 3)
ARTE NOVA 432130482-2 (1995)

Karel Ančerl/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Mozart: Violin Concerto No. 3 and Bassoon Concerto)
SUPRAPHON SU 3678-2 (2003)
(original LP release: SUPRAPHON LPM 33) (1954)

Karel Ančerl/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra (rec. 1966)
( + Haydn: Symphony No. 104, Brahms: Symphony No. 2, Smetana: Ma Vlast- From Bohemia's Meadows and Forests, Tabor and Blanik and Bartered Bride-Overture)
TAHRA TAH 405-6 (2 CDs) (2001)

Jiří Bělohlávek/Prague Philharmonia
( + Mozart: Symphony No. 38)
SUPRAPHON SU 3713-2 (2003)

Michael Bialoguski/New Philharmonia Orchestra
( + Martinů: Symphony No. 6)
UNICORN RHS 309 (LP) (1971)

Paul Freeman/Czech National Symphony Orchestra
( + Mass in B flat)
CEDILLE RECORDS CDR 90000 058 (2001)

Thomas Hengelbrock/Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen
( + Schubert: Symphony No. 1)
DEUTSCHE HARMONIA MUNDI DHM 05472 77379-2 (1997)

Libor Hlavácek/Pardubice Chamber Phulharmonia
( + Stamitz: Symphonies in A, B and G)
PANTON 8112012 (1990)
(original LP release: PANTON 81100369)

Dirk Joeres/West German Sinfonia Orchestra
( + 6 Impromptus for Piano)
REGIS FRC 9101 (1990)

Sir Charles Mackerras/English Chamber Orchestra
( + Dvořák: Czech Suite, Romance for Violin and Orchestra, Suk: Summer Tale, Fantastic Scherzo, Fantasy for Violin and Orchestra, Janáček: Jealousy, Elgar: Enigma Variations, Delius: Brigg Fair, Song of the High Hills and On Hearing the First Cuckoo in Spring
DECCA 4757061 (3CDs) (2005)
(original LP release: PHILIPS 6500 203) (1972)

Sir Charles Mackerras/Scottish Chamber Orchestra
( + Arriaga: Symphony in D and Los Esclavos Felices Overture)
HYPERION CDA66800 (1995)

Ivan Pařik/Prague Chamber Orchestra
( + Bravura Variations and Introduction and Rondo Brillant)
SUPRAPHON 11103868 (LP) (1986)

Prague Chamber Orchestra
( + Reicha: Symphony in E flat)
SUPRAPHON SUAST50007 (LP) (1962)

František Vajnar/Prague Chamber Orchestra
( + Reicha: Symphony in E flat)
EMI CO65 36660/SUPRAPHON 11102634 (LP) (1981)




SAMO VREMŠAK
(1930-2004, SLOVENE)

Born in Kamnik. He studied composition with Marjan Kozina at the Ljubljana Academy of Music and served there as a professor. He was also a conductor of the Choir of the Slovenian Philharmonic. He composed orchestral, chamber and choral works. His Symphony (No. 1) (1956) was his graduation work at the Academy and there is also Symphony No. 3 (1989) and Simfonietta in Modo Classico in Due Tempi for Chamber Orchestra (1988).

Symphony No. 2 (1972-3)

Anton Nanut/Slovenian Philharmonic Orchesrtra
( + Child-Murderess in a Dungeon, Sonatina in due Tempi, Eight Songs to Gipsy Poetry, Four Songs, and Solomon's Song of Songs)
EDICIJ DSS 200024


Sinfonietta in Modo Classico (1988)

Anton Nanut/Slovenian Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Seven Miniatures, Lebic: Queensland Musc and Srebotnjak: Slovenica and Trumpet and Devil)
RTS SAZAS DD 0144

 

CHARIS VRONDOS
(b.1951, GREEK)

Born in Vitina-Arcadia. He began his music studies in the Greek Conservatory of Lefkada and then took piano lessons with Eleni Zioga in Athens and also attended seminars in electronic music. Later on he was a student of Yannis Papaioannou in counterpoint. He has worked as a music critic and has written several books on various musical subjects and has also worked at the Greek State Radio. He has composed works in various genres and styles. His orchestral output includes Symphonies Nos. 2 (1986) and 3 (1986).:

Symphony No. 1 (1982)

Rudolf Werthen/Ljubliana Radio and Television Orchestra
( + Dragatakis: Symphony No. 1 and Violin Concerto)
LYRA CD 0061 (2001)
(original LP release: GREEK DISCOGRAPHY 91015) (1986)





BOLESŁAW WOYTOWICZ
(1899-1980, POLISH)

Born in Dunajowce, Podolia (now in Ukraine). He studied the piano with Aleksander Michałowski at the Chopin High School of Music in Warsaw where he also studied composition with Felicjan Szopski and Witold Maliszewski. He then embarked on a performing career that took him throughout Europe and America and went for further studies in Nadia Boulanger’s class in Paris. After World War II, he was appointed to positions at the Conservatories in Katowice and in Kraków. He composed a ballet, orchestral, chamber, piano and vocal works. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 1(1938) and 2 (1945).

Symphony No. 3 for Piano and Orchestra "Sinfonia Concertante" (1963)

Jan Krenz/Bołeslaw Woytowicz (piano)/Polish Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Moszumanska-Nazar: Interpretations, Schaffer: Little Symphony and Dobrowolski: Music for Orchestra)
MUZA SX 2315 (LP) (1960s)

 

FRANCISZEK WOZNIAK
(1932–2009, POLISH)

Born in Rowicz. He studied composition with Tadeusz Szeligowski at the Poznan State Higher Music School. He composed concertos, sonatas, and cantatas but no orchestral symphonies.

Symphony for Percussion (1970)

Jerzy Zgodzinski/Poznan Percussion Ensemble
( + Gardo: Triptych for Percussion, Niewiadomska: Tinta e Ritmo for Percussion, and Bauer: Divertimento for 2 Pianos and Percussion)
MUZA SXL 0809 (LP) (1973)




ALEKOS XENOS
(1912-1995, GREEK)

Born in Zakynthos. He studied music with the Zakynthos Philharmonic's conductor and later studied at the Athens Conservatory with Dimitrii Mitropoulos, Philoctetes Economides and George Sklavos In addition to composing he wrote several musicological articles for newspapers and journals.

Symphony No. 2 "Of Peace" (1968)

Alkis Panayotopoulos/Bulgarian National Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Antoniou: Symphony No. 1 and Dragatakis: Symphony No. 3)
LYRA CD 1041(2004)




ALEXANDER YOSIFOV
(b.1940, BULGARIAN)

Born in Sofia, the son of composer Yosko Yossifov. He graduated from the Sofia State Academy of Music where he studied composition with Pancho Vladigerov, conducting with Konstantin Iliev and piano with Zheni Kovacheva. He became professor at this school and at the New Bulgarian University. An extremely prolific composer, .he wrote over 1,500 compositions in all music genres: including operas, ballets, cantatas; orchestral, chamber, instrumental and choral works as well as music for children, popular songs and folksong and folk dance arrangements. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 2 (1969), 3 for Solo Bass and Orchestra (1970) and 6 "Polyphony" (1992), Sinfonie Concertante for Cello and Orchestra (1984) and Sinfonia Breve for String Orchestra (1988).

Symphony No. 1 in A minor "Sinfonietta" (1968)

Vasil Stefanov/Bulgarian Television and Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Tsvetanov: Overture)
BALKANTON BCA 1070 (LP) (1970s)

Symphony No. 4 "April Insurgents" (1975)

Vasil Stefanov/Bulgarian Television and Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Tsvetanov: Overture)
BALKANTON BCA 1969 (LP) (1970s)


Symphony No. 5 "Proto-Bulgarians" (1980)

Vasil Kazandjiev/Bulgarian National Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Youth Overture)
BALKANTON BCA 1300/409 (LP) (c.1980)

Sinfonietta for Chamber Orchestra (1966)

Vasil Lolov/Bulgarian Television and Radio Collegium for Chamber Music
( + Gabichvadze: Chamber Symphony No. 2
BALKANTON BKA 1404 (LP) (1970s)




YOSKO YOSIFOV
(1911- 2001, BULGARIAN)

Born in Kazanlak. He graduated from the Sofia State Academy of Music where he studied composition with Dobri Hristov and Pancho Vladigerov.He worked as a choral, operatic and orchestral conductor and also worked for Bulgarian Radio. He composed operas, operettas, orchestral, chamber and choral works. The orchestral works include 9 Symphonies (1942-96).
.

Symphony No. 5 (1975)

Dobrin Petkov/Plovdiv State Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Bassoon Concerto)
BALKANTON 2101 (LP) (1970s)


Symphony No. 6 in A minor (c. 1980)

Ivan Marinov/Varna Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra
( + Overture 1300)
BALKANTON BCA 1300/408 (LP) (c.1980)




EUGENE ZADOR (JENŐ ZÁDOR)
(1894-1977, HUNGARIAN > USA)

Born in Bátaszék. He studied with Richard Heuberger at the Vienna Music Academy, Max Reger in Leipzig and with Fritz Volbach at Münster University. From 1921 he taught at the Vienna City Conservatory and became an honorary teacher at the Liszt Academy of Music, Budapest. At the outset of World War II, he left Hungary and settled in Hollywood, where he orchestrated more than 120 film scores. He also composed operas, ballets, orchestral, chamber and vocal works. His other Symphonies are: Nos. 1 "Romantic" (1922), 2 "Sinfonia Tecnica" (1932) and 3 "Tanzsymphonie" (1937).

Symphony No. 4 "Children's Symphony" (1941)

Amerigo Marino/anonymous orchestra
( + Elwell: Dance of the Merry Dwarfs, Villa-Lobos: Little Train of the Caipira, Leo: Arietta, Schubert Schubert: The Bee, Schumann: Wild Horseman, Happy Farmer, Liadov: Music Box and Gounod: Funeral March of a Marionette)
BOWMAR BOL 64 (LP) (1965)

Mariusz Smolij/Budapest Symphony Orchestra
( + Five Contrasts, Aria and Allegro, Hungarian Capriccio and Csardas Rhapsody)
NAXOS 8.572548 (2012)

 

ISADORA ŽEBELJAN
(b. 1967, SERBIAN)

Born in Belgrade. She studied composition at the Belgrade Music Academy with Vlastimir Trajkovic, a student of Olivier Messiaen, and since 2002 has held the position of Professor of Composition at the Belgrade Music Academy. She has composed operas, incidental music, film scores, orchestral, chamber, choral and vocal works.

Symphony in 3 Movements "Escenas Picaras"

David Porcelijn/Janáček Philharmonic Orchestra (1990-2)
( + The Horses of St. Mark, The Minstrel's Dance, Elegy for Orchestra and Rukoveti)
CPO 777670-2 (2011)




LUBOMÍR ŽELEZNÝ
(1925-1979, CZECH)

Born in Ostrava. He was a private student of Karel Boleslav Jirák and then studied composition with Karel Janeček at the Prague Conservatory and then Pavel Borřovec at the Prague Academy of Musical Arts. He worked for Czech Radio. He composed orchestral, chamber and vocal works.

Symphony No. 1 (1963)

Jiří Bělohlávek/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Viola Concerto)
PANTON 8110 0173 (LP) (1981)


Symphony (No. 2) for Small Orchestra (1971)

Miloš Konvalinka/Musici de Praga and Chamber Harmony members
( + Flosman: Concertante Music)
PANTON 11 0314 (LP) (1972)




ILJA ZELJENKA
(1932-2007, SLOVAK)

Born in Bratislava. He took private lessons in harmony and counterpoint with Ján Zimmer and studied the piano with Rudolf Macudzinski. Subsequently, he studied composition with Ján Cikker at the Bratislava Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. He worked as dramaturge for the Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra and as producer and lecturer for Czechoslovak Radio in Bratislava. Later on, he taught at the Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. His large catalogue covers most genres from opera to works for solo instruments and voices. His unrecorded Symphonies are: Nos. 1 (1953), 2 in C for String Orchestra (1961), 3 (1972), 5 (1985), 6 (1998), 7 for Soprano, Baritone, Chorus and Orchestra (1998), 8 (2001) and 9 (2003) as well as Symfoniettas Nos. 1 for Strings "Giocosa", 2 for Chamber Orchestra
(2000) and No. 3 (2001)

Symphony No. 4 "Ballet Symphony" (1978)

Ondrej Lenard/Orchestra of the Smetana Theater in Prague
OPUS 9111 0563 (LP) (1979)



MACIEJ ZIELIŃSKI
(b. 1971, POLISH)

Born in Warsaw. He graduated from the Fryderyk Chopin University of Music in Warsaw, where he studied composition with Marian Borkowski and from the Royal Academy of Music in London, where he studied with Paul Patterson. He hascomposed orchestral, chamber and vocal works.

V Symphony (2013)

Łukasz Borowicz/Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
( + Elemen T)
DUX RECORDS DUX0988 (2014)

 

JÁN ZIMMER
(1926-1993, SLOVAK)

Born in Ružomberk.. He studied the organ, the piano with Anna Kafendová and composition with Eugen Suchoň at the Bratislava Conservatory before continuing his studies in composition under Ferenc Farkas at the Budapest Music Academy and had further training in Salzburg. He worked for Czechoslovak Radio and then taught theory and the piano at the Bratislava Conservatory. Afterwards, he devoted himself to composition and performance as a concert pianist. He composed operas, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works. He composed 12 Symphonies. The following have not been recorded: Nos. 2, Op. 26 (1958), 3, Op. 33 (1959), 4, Op. 37 for Soprano, Tenor, Mixed Chorus and Orchestra (1959), 5, Op.44 (1961), 6, Op. 51 "Improvisata" (1965), 7, Op.54 (1966), 8 Op.68 (1971), 9, Op.72 (1973, 10 for Strings and Woodwinds, Op.82,"Homage à J. Haydn" (1979), 11, Op. 98 (1980) and 12, Op.107 for Orchestra, Organ and Tape (1986).

Symphony No. 1, Op. 21 (1955)

Ladislav Slovák/Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
( + Jaroch: Symphony No. 2)
SUPRAPHON SUA 18505 (LP) (1960s)

 

ALADÁR ZOLTÁN
(1929-1978, ROMANIAN)

Born in Martinis of Hungarian descent. He studied composition with Gábor Jodál and Wilhelm Demian at the Cluj Academy where he served as assistant lecturer in harmony. In Tîrgu-Mureş , was a music editor, , conducted the Song and Dance Ensemble, worked as head of department at the radio studio and became director of the Tîrgu-Mureş Philharmonic Orchestra. He composed dance scenes, orchestral, chamber, instrumental and vocal works.

Symphony No. 1 (1963)

Emil Simon/Cluj Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra
( + Csiky: 2 Pieces for Orchestra and Terenyi: The Wonderful Bird)
ELECTRECORD ST-ECE 0907 (LP) (1977)


Symphony No. 2 "In Praise of the Homeland" (1972)

Szalman Lóránt/Tîrgu-Mures Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra
( + Csiky: Prelude, Fugue and Postlude and: Szabó: Parmi des Éclats de Verre)
ELECTRECORD STM-ECE 01504 (LP) (1971)

 


AGATA ZUBEL
(b. 1978, POLAND)

Born in Wrocław. She studied composition in the class of John Wichrowski and singing under the direction of Danuta Paziuk-Zipser at the Karol Lipinski Music Academy in Wrocław and continyed her studies at the Enschede Conservatory in the Netherlands. She not only composes but is well-known as a singer of music by contemporary composers. She has composed mostly orchestral, chamber, instrumental and voval works. Her unrecorded Symphony No. 1 was written in 2002.

Symphony No. 2 (2005)

Wojciech Czepiel/Symphony Orchestra of the Academy of Music in Cracow
( + Bujarski: Peirene and Nono: Das atmende Klarsein)
WARSAW AUTUMN 2006-CD No. 4, POLMIC 022 (non-commerical) (2007)

Symphony No. 3 for Double-Bell Trumpet and Orchestra (2008-2009)

Rene Gulikers/Marco Blaauw, double-bell trumpet/Polish Orchestra Sinfonia Iuventus
( + L. Andriessen: The Hague Hacking, Kulenty: Twenty-Five, and Stanczyk: Nibiru)
WARSAW AUTUMN 2010-CD No. 3, POLMIC 063 (non-commerical) (2011)


LOVRO ŽUPANOVIĆ
(b.1925, CROATIAN)

Born in Šibenik. He studied musicology at the Academy of Music in Zagreb and was awarded a doctorate at the University of Ljubljana. He also studied composition in Ljubljana under Lucijan Škerjanc and taught in schools in Zagreb culminating in the department of musicology at the Zagreb Academy of Music.His compositions also include an opera, string quartets, cantatas and music for piano and organ.

Sinfonietta for Chamber Orchestra (1954)

Pavle Dešpalj/Zagreb Radio Television Symphony Orchestra
( + Chitara Octocorda, Causeries, Microsuite and Matoš's Triptych)
JUGOTON LSY 66051 (LP) (1979)




WOJCIECH ZIEMOWIT ZYCH
(b.1976, POLISH)

Born in Warsaw. He studied composition at the Kraków Academy with Marek Stachowski and then with Peter-Jan Wagemans at at the Rotterdam Conservatory. Thus far, he has composed mostly orchestral and instrumental works.

Symphony No.1 (2001-2)

Szymon Bywalec/New Music Orchestra, Katowice
( + Lason: Chamber Music No. 5, R. Berger: Convergence III and Lubin: Rum-Cum)
WARSAW AUTUMN 2002 CD No. 2 (non-commercial CD)

Przemysław Fiugajski/Podlasie Opera and Philharmonic Orchestra, Bialystok
( + Bass Clarinet Concerto and Stirrings of the Will)
DUX DUX0722 (2010)


* * * * * * * * * *

APPENDIX

The composer paragraphs above include lists of unrecorded symphonies by those already represented but what follows is a list of such works by East-Central European and Balkan composers whose symphonies are thus far totally unrecorded. The list is quite extensive though by no means exhaustive. Unlike the Discography above, composers from Albania, Bosnia-Herzogovina, Kosovo and Montenegro are represented. The large number of symphonies displayed below is a real indication of the impact made by the symphony in this part of Europe from its gradual appearance to the present day.

Ábrányi, Emil (1882-1970, Hungarian): 2 Symphonies.
Abrashev, Bozhidar (1936-2006, Bulgarian): 3 Symphonies.
Adamík, Josef (1947-2009, Czech): 3 Symphonies.
Ajdinovič, Jacek Wiktor (b. 1985, Polish): 3 Symphonies.
Alexiev, Alexey (1950-2000, Bulgarian): Symphony.
Ambros, Vladimir (1891-1956, Czech): 3 Symphonies, Sinfonietta.
Anbild, Karol (1925-2008, Polish): 3 Symphonies.
Ančerl, Karel (1908-1973, Czech): Sinfonietta.
Andreev, Georgi (b.1969, Bulgarian): Symphony.
Andreevska, Jana (b.1967, Macedonian): Sinfonietta.
Arel, Bülent (1919-1990, Turkish): 3 Symphonies.
Arma, Paul (1905-1987, Hungarian): Symphony.
Arnaoudov, Georgi (b.1957, Bulgarian): 2 Symphonies.
Astriab, Jan (1937-2005, Polish): Chamber Symphony.
Atanackovič, Slobodan (b.1937, Serbian): Sinfonia da Festa, Sinfonia Eterofonica.
Avramov, Evgenii (b.1929, Bulgarian): Chamber Symphony.
Avramovski, Risto (1943-2007, Macedonian): 6 Symphonies.
Axman, Emil (1887-1949, Czech): 6 Symphonies.
Badinski, Nikolay (b.1937, Bulgarian): 3 Symphonies.
Baginski, Zbigniew (b.1949, Polish): 3 Symphonies.
Ballata, Zeqirja (b.1943, Kosovar): Symphony.
Balyozov, Roumen (b.1949, Bulgarian): 4 Symphonies.
Banasik , Marcin Filip (b. 1982, Polish): Symphony No. 1.
Barberis, Mansi (1899-1986, Romanian): Symphony No. 1.
Bargielski, Zbigniew (b.1937, Polish): Sinfonia.
Bartók, Béla (1881-1945, Hungarian): Symphony in E flat major.
Bartovský, Josef (1884-1964, Czech): 2 Symphonies.
Basarab, Mircea (1921-1995, Romanian): Sinfonietta.
Bázlik, Igor (b.1941, Slovak): Sinfonietta.
Bergamo, Petar (b.1930, Croatian): 2 Symphonies.
Bezděk, Jiří (1961, Czech): 2 Symphonies.
Blatný, Josef (1891-1980, Czech): Sinfonia Brevis, Chamber Symphony.
Błażewicz, Marcin (b.1937, Polish): 2 Sinfonias.
Blodek, Vilém(1834-1874, Czech): Symphony in D minor.
Bodnár, Norbert (b.1956, Slovak): 2 Symphonies.
Bogusławski, Edward (1940-2003, Poland): Symphony for Chorus and Orchestra, Symphonie Concertante.
Bohác, Josef (1929-2006, Czech): Symphony in A, Little Symphony.
Bohociu, Ioan (1874-1944, Romanian): Sinfonia Romantica.
Bojoncă, Alecu (b.1963, Macedonian): Symphony.
Bortnowski, Martin (b.1972, Polish): 2 Symphonies.
Bošnjak, Jugoslav (b.1954, Serbian): Sinfonia-Passacaglia.
Božič, Darijan (1933, Slovene): Symphony.
Brânduş, Nicolae (1935, Romanian): Ballad Symphony.
Brediceanu, Mihai (1920-2005, Romanian): Symphony.
Brkanovič, Ivan (1906-1987, Croatian): 5 Symphonies.
Bruchenthal, Mihai (1908-1989, Romanian): 2 Symphonies.
Bruzdowicz, Joanna (b.1943, Polish): 2 Symphonies.
Brzowski, Jósef (1803-1888, Polish): Grand Dramatic Symphony.
Buicliu, Nicolae (1906-1974, Romanian): 3 Symphonies.
Bukowski, Ryszard (1940-2003, Polish): 7 Symphonies, Sinfonietta.
Burghauser, Jarmil (1921-1997, Czech): 3 Symphonies.
Burian, Emil F. (1904-1959, Czech): 2 Symphonies
Burlas, Ladislav (b.1927, Slovak): 2 Symphonies.
Bury, Edward (1919-1995, Polish): 8 Symphonies.
Buttykay, Ákos (1871-1935, Hungarian): 2 Symphonies.
Bužarovski, Dimitrije (b.1952, Macedonian): 3 Symphonies.
Chagrin, Francis (1906-1972, Romanian): 2 Symphonies.
Cipra, Milo (1906-85, Croatian): 2 Symphonies, Sinfonietta.
Ciortea, Tudor (1903-1982, Romanian): Sinfonietta Silvana.
Ciuntu, Paul (1866-1918, Romanian): Symphony in A minor.
Chlubna, Osvald (1893-1971, Czech): 3 Symphonies.
Csíky, Boldizsár (Balthasar) (b.1937, Romanian): Symphony.
Czajkowski, Andrzej (1935-1982, Polish): Sinfonia.
Czarnecki, Sławomir (b.1949, Polish): Sinfonietta, Symphonie Concertante.
Dąbrowski, Florian (1913-2002, Polish): Sinfonia.
Dafov, Yordan (b.1940, Bulgarian): 4 Symphonies.
Dandara, Liviu (1933-1991, Romanian): Sinfonietta Lirica.
Dębski, Krzesimir (b.1953, Polish): 2 Symphonies.
Decsényi, János (b.1927, Hungarian): 3 Symphonies, Sinfonietta.
Demian, Wilhelm (b.1910, Romanian): Symphony No. 1.
Denev, Tsvetan (b.1946, Bulgarian): Symphony
Despić, Dejan (b.1930, Serbian): Symphony in D minor.
Devčić, Natko (1914-1997, Croatian): Symphony.
Diamandiev, Andrei (b.1961, Bulgarian): 2 Symphonies, Sinfonietta for Strings.
Dibák, Igor (b.1947, Slovak): Chamber Symphony.
Dimov, Ivan (b.1927, Bulgarian): 2 Symphonies.
Dizdari, Limos (b.1942, Albanian): Symphony No. 1.
Dobos, Kálmán (b.1931, Hungarian): Symphony.
Dobronić, Antun (1878-1955, Croatian): 8 Symphonies.
Dobrowolski, Andrzej (1921-1990, Polish): Symphony No. 1.
Dobrzyński, Ignacy Feliks (1807-1867, Polish): 2 Symphonies.
Drożdżewski, Piotr (b.1948, Polish): Sinfonia da Camera.
Duchnowski, Grzegorz (b.1971, Poland): 4 Symphonies.
Duniecki, Stanisław (1839-1870, Polish): Symphony.
Dziewulska, Maria (1909-2006, Polish): 4 Symphonies.
Dziewulski, Eugeniusz (1889-1978, Polish): Sinfonietta.
Eliezer, Bentzion (1920-1993, Bulgarian): Sinfonietta for Strings
Emmert, František (b.1940, Czech): 24 Symphonies.
Enacovici, George (1891-1965, Romanian): Symphony in E minor.
Erdener, Turgay (b.1957, Turkish): Symphony, A Sea Symphony.
Faltus, Leoš (b.1937, Czech): 4 Symphonies.
Faragó, Béla (b. 1961, Hungarian): Symphony. No. 1, Sinfonietta.
Farkas, Ödön (1851-1912, Hungarian): Symphony; Rákóczy Symphony.
Feguš, Maksimiljan (b.1948, Slovene): Symphony No. 1.
Feldman, Ludovic (1893-1987, Romanian): Symphony in D, Sinfonia da Camera.
Filev, Ivan (b.1941, Bulgarian): Sinfonietta for Strings.
Firulescu, Octav (b 1959, Romanian): Symphony No. 1.
Fischer, Jan (1921-2006, Czech): Symphony No. 1.
Fišer, Luboš (1935-1999, Czech): 2 Symphonies.
Fitelberg, Grzegorz (1879-1953, Polish): 2 Symphonies.
Fitelberg, Jerzy (1903-1951, Polish): Sinfonietta, Sinfonia.
Folprecht, Zdeněk (1909-1961, Czech): 4 Symphonies.
Fotek, Jan (b.1928, Polish): 2 Symphonies.
Fribec, Krešimir (19081996, Croatian): 2 Symphonies.
Frid, Géza (1904-1989, Polish): Symphony, Symphonietta for Strings.
Friemann, Witold (1889-1977, Polish): 3 Symphonies.
Gaál, Jenő (1906-1980, Hungarian): 2 Symphonies.
Gabryś, Ryszard (b.1942, Polish): Sinfonietta Concertante
Galinescu, Gavril (1883-1960, Romanian): 2 Symphonies.
Ganev, Dimitar (1895-1970, Bulgarian): 2 Symphonies.
Gárdonyi, Zoltán (1906-1986, Hungarian): Symphony, Sinfonietta.
Gerbič, Fran (1840-1917, Slovene): 2 Symphonies.
Gheciu, Diamandi (1892-1980, Romanian): Symphony of Liberation.
Gheorghiu, Valentin (b.1928, Romanian): 2 Symphonies.
Gjini, Vinçenc (b.1935, Kosovar): 3 Symphonies, Sinfonietta.
Gjoni, Simon (1927-1991, Albanian): Symphony.
Glinkowski, Aleksander (1941-1991, Polish): Sinfonia Mesta e Tranquilla.
Gniot, Walerian (1902-1977, Polish): Sinfonietta, Sinfonia.
Godár, Vladimír (b.1956, Slovak): 2 Symphonies, Sinfonia Giocosa.
Golabovski, Sotir (b.1937, Macedonian): Symphony.
Golestan, Stan (1875-1956, Romanian): Symphony in G minor.
Górecki, Mikolaj (b.1971, Polish): Symphony No. 1, Sinfonietta.
Goshev, Jordan (b.1960, Bulgarian): Symphony.
Grigoriu, Theodor (b.1926, Romanian): Sinfonia Cantabile.
Grubba, Gedymin (b.1981, Polish): Sinfonia Jubilate.
Gryska, Piotr (b.1976, Polish): 2 Sinfoniettas.
Hába, Karel (1898-1972, Czech): 2 Symphonies.
Harizanos, Nikos (b.1969, Greek): Symphony No. 1.
Harašta, Milan (1919-1946, Czech): 2 Symphonies.
Hatrík, Juraj (b.1941, Slovak): Symphony No. 1, Sinfonietta.
Hawel, Jan Wincenty (b.1936, Polish): 6 Symphonies.
Hidas, Frigyes (1928-2007, Hungarian): Symphony
Hnilicka, Alois (1826-1909, Czech): 2 Symphonies.
Horusitzky, Zoltán (1903-1985, Hungarian): Symphony.
Horvat, Stanko (b.1930, Croatian: Sinfonietta, Sinfonia.
Hristoskov, Petar (b.1917, Bulgarian): Concerto-Symphony.
Hrovat, Vladimir (b.1947, Slovene): Sinfonietta, Sinfonia Concertante.
Hrušovský, Ivan (1927-2001, Slovak): 2 Symphonies.
Hubay, Jenő (1858-1937, Hungarian): 4 Symphonies.
Hurník, Ilja (b.1922, Czech): Symphony in C, Sinfonietta.
Ibrahimi, Feim (1935-1997, Albanian): 2 Symphonies.
Ijac, Vasile (1899-1976, Romanian): 5 Symphonies.
Ikonomov, Boyan (1900-1973, Bulgarian): 4 Symphonies.
Ikonomov, Stefan (1937-1994, Bulgarian): Symphony for Strings.
Ilievski, Kiril (b.1955, Bulgarian): 3 Symphonies.
Iorgulescu, Adrian (b.1951, Romanian): 3 Symphonies.
Jabłoński, Henryk Hubertus (1915-1989, Polish): 2 Symphonies.
Janeček, Karel (1903-1974): 2 Symphonies, Sinfonietta.
Jarda, Tudor (1922-2007, Romanian): 3 Symphonies.
Jasinski, Marek (b.1949, Polish): Symphony.
Jelescu, Paul (1901-1989, Romanian): Sinfonie Română.
Jeremiáš, Otakar (1892-1962, Czech): 2 Symphonies.
Jevtic, Ivan (b.1947, Serbian): 4 Symphonies.
Jiráčková, Marta (b.1932, Czech): 2 Symphonies.
Jordanov, Danko (b.1959, Bulgarian): Symphony Triptych.
Joteyko, Tadeusz (1872-1932, Polish): Symphony in C.
Julea, Nicolae (1908-1986, Romanian): 4 Symphonies.
Junger, Erwin (b.1931, Romanian): 3 Symphonies.
Kamienski, Lucian (1885-1964, Polish): Sinfonia Paschalis.
Kandov, Alexander (b.1949, Bulgarian): Youth Symphony.
Kantuser, Bozidar (1921-1999, Slovene): 4 Symphonies.
Karatanassov, Vesselin (b.1966, Bulgarian): Youth Symphony.
Karača, Igor (b.1974, Bosnian): 3 Symphonies.
Karastoyanov, Asen (1893-1976, Bulgarian): 4 Symphonies.
Karastoyanova, Helene (b.1933, Bulgarian): Sinfonietta for Strings.
Kardos, István (1891-1975, Hungarian): 4 Symphonies.
Karel, Rudolf (1880-1945, Czech): 3 Symphonies.
Kątski, Antoni (1817-1899, Polish): Symphony in A minor.
Kazacsay, Tibor (1892-1977, Hungarian): Satiric Symphony.
Kazandzhiev, Vasil (b.1934, Bulgarian): 5 Symphonies, Sinfonia Concertante, Sinfonietta.
Kazuro, Stanislaw (1881-1961, Polish): Wiosna Symphony.
Khristov, Dimitar (b.1933, Bulgarian): 3 Symphonies, Sinfonietta for Strings.
Kiełb, Krystian (b.1971, Polish): Chamber Symphony, Sinfonietta for Strings.
Kiesewetter, Tomasz (1911-1999, Polish): 3 Symphonies.
Kirigin, Ivo (1914-1964, Croatian): Symphony.
Kisielewski, Stefan (1911-1991, Polish): 2 Symphonies, Chamber Symphony, Symphony for 15 Performers, Symphony in a Square
Klega, Miroslav (1926-1993, Czech): Symphony.
Klinkova, Zhivka (b.1924, Bulgarian): 5 Symphonies, Sinfonietta.
Koci, Akil Mark (b.1936, Kosovar): Symphony, Sinfonietta.
Kocsár, Miklós (b.1933, Hungarian): Sinfonietta for Strings.
Kodalli, Nevit (1924-2009, Turkish): Symphony in C, Sinfonietta for Strings.
Koffler, Józef (1896-1944, Polish): 4 Symphonies.
Kókai, Rezso (1906-1962, Hungarian): Symphony in E flat.
Komorous, Rudolf (b.1931, Czech ):3 Symphonies.
Kondracki, Michał (1902-1984, Polish): Little Highlander Symphony, Victory Symphony.
Kopecky, Ivo (b.1947, Slovak): Symphony.
Kopelent, Marek (b.1932, Czech): Symphony.
Koprowski, Piotr PaweŁ (b.1947, Polish): 5 Symphonies.
Kořínek, Miloslav (1925-1998, Slovak): Symphony.
Kos, Božidar (b.1934, Slovene): Sinfonietta for Strings.
Košut, Michal (b.1954, Czech): 2 Symphonies.
Koszewski, Andrzej (b.1922, Polish): Sinfonietta for Strings.
Kotev, Angel (b.1951, Bulgarian): Symphony 1.
Kotoński, Włodzimierz (b.1925, Polish): 3 Symphonies.
Kounadis, Arghyris (b.1924, Greek): Sinfonietta.
Koundouroff, Aristotelis (1896-1969, Greek): Sinfonietta.
Koushev, Viatcheslav (b.1951, Bulgarian): Sinfonietta.
Kowalski-Banasewicz, Bartosz (b.1977, Polish): 2 Symphonies.
Kowalski, Július (1912-2003, Slovak): 7 Symphonies, Sinfonietta, Sinfonietta Concertante.
Králík, Václav (1891-1951, Czech): 2 Symphonies.
Krejčí, Mirolslav (1891-1964, Czech): 3 Symphonies.
Krenz, Jan (b.1926, Poland): 3 Symphonies.
Křička, Jaroslav (1882-1969, Czech): Spring Symphony, Sinfonietta, Sinfonietta Semplice.
Krivokapič, Igor (b.1965, Slovene): 4 Symphonies.
Krushev, Iovcho (b.1957, Bulgarian): Symphony.
Krupowicz, Stanisław (b.1952, Polish): Symphony.
Krzanowski, Andrzej (1951-1990, Polish): 2 Symphonies.
Kubelík, Jan (1880-1940, Czech): Symphony.
Kučera, Václav (b.1929, Czech): Symphony.
Kulenty, Hanna (b.1961, Polish): 3 Symphonies.
Kupkovič, Ladislav (b.1938, Slovak): 6 Sinfonias.
Kvapil, Jaroslav (1892-1958, Czech): 4 Symphonies.
Kwiatkowski, Ryszard (1931-1993, Poland): 4 Symphonies.
Kydionatis, Konstantinos (1908-1996, Greek): 4 Symphonies.
Łabuński, Feliks (1892-1979, Polish): 2 Symphonies.
Lakešič, Ilija (1908-1973, Montenegrin): Symphony in G.
Lambov, Kiril (b. 1955, Bulgarian): Chamber Symphony.
Lara, Kozma (b.1930, Albanian): Symphony.
Lefeld, Jerzy (1898–1990, Polish): 2 Symphonies.
Lejava, Marián (b.1976, Slovak): Chamber Symphony.
Lerescu, Sorin (b.1953, Romanian): 4 Symphonies.
Lhotka, Fran (1883-1962, Croatian): Symphony.
Lhotka-Kalinski, Ivo (1913-1987, Croatian): Symphony in E flat, Sinfonietta.
Lovec, Vladimir (1922-1992, Slovene): 2 Symphonies.
Lučić, Franjo (1889-1972, Croatian): 2 Symphonies.
Łukaszewski, Paweł (b.1968, Polish): Sinfonietta.
Machl, Tadeusz (1922–2003, Polish): 6 Symphonies.
Magdalenič, Miroslav (1906-1969, Croatian): Symphony in F minor.
Magdič, Josip (b.1937, Croatian): Symphony.
Makedonski-Taskov, Kiril (1925-1984, Macedonian): 5 Symphonies.
Maklakiewicz, Jan Adam (1899-1954, Polish): 2 Symphonies.
Malawski, Artur (1904-1957, Polish): 2 Symphonies, Sinfonietta.
Maliszewski, Witold (1873-1939, Polish): 4 Symphonies.
Malovec, Jozef (b.1933, Slovak): 2 Symphonies, Chamber Symphony.
Mančev, Tome (b.1950, Macedonian): 4 Symphonies, Symphoniette.
Marbe, Myriam (1931-1997, Romanian): Symphony No. 1, Symphonia.
Martinček, Dušan (1936-2006, Slovak): Symphony In Memoriam J. Haydn.
Matičič, Janez (b.1926, Slovene): 2 Symphonies.
Major, Gyula (1858-1925, Hungarian): 6 Symphonies.
Mechura, Leopold (1804-1870, Czech): 6 Symphonies
Mendelsohn, Alfred (1910-1966, Romanian): 9 Symphonies.
Mihalovici, Marcel (1898-1985, Romanian): 5 Symphonies.
Mikula, Zdenko (b.1916, Slovak): Sinfonietta.
Milcoveanu, Dumitru (1914-1985, Romanian): Symphony No. 1.
Miletič, Miroslav (b.1925, Croatian): Symphony for Winds.
Minkin, Tsenko (b.1959, Bulgarian): 2 Symphonies.
Mizerit, Klaro Marija (1914-2007, Slovene): 5 Symphonies.
Mociulschi, Adrian (b.1973, Romanian): 2 Symphonies.
Modr, Antonín (1898-1983, Czech): 2 Symphonies, Sinfonietta.
Moór, Emanuel (1863-1931, Hungarian): 8 Symphonies.
Morawski-Dąbrowa, Eugeniusz (1876-1948, Polish): 6 Symphonies.
Moss, Piotr (b.1949, Polish): Symphony in 10 Parts, Chamber Symphony, Sinfonie Concertante, Sinfonietta.
Moutafchiev, Stefan (1942-1997, Bulgarian): Sea Symphony.
Mykietyn, Paweł (b.1971, Polish): 2 Symphonies.
Nastasijević, Svetomir (1902-1979, Serbian): 2 Symphonies.
Natanson, Tadeusz (1927-1990, Polish): 7 Symphonies, Symphoniette Classique.
Natra, Sergiu (b.1924, Romanian): 2 Symphonies.
Navrátil, Karel (1867-1936, Czech): 2 Symphonies.
Negrea, Marţian (1893-1973, Romanian): Sinfonia Primavera.
Nelhybel, Václav (1919-1996, Czech): Symphony, Sinfonietta Concertante, 3 Symphonies for Band.
Nenov, Dimitar (1901-1953, Bulgarian): 2 Symphonies.
Nenov, Vesselin (b.1957, Bulgarian): 2 Symphonies.
Nešvera, Josef (1842-1914, Czech): Symphony in G minor.
Neumann, Věroslav (1931-2006, Czech): Chamber Symphony.
Niewiadomski, Stanisław (1859-1936, Polish): 2 Symphonies.
Nikodemowicz, Andrzej (b.1925, Polish): Symphony.
Nikolov, Dimitar (b.1945, Bulgarian): 4 Symphonies.
Nikolovski, Vlastimir (1925-2001, Macedonian): 2 Symphonies.
Novák, Jan (1921-1984, Czech): Symphonia Bipartita.
Novák, Pavel (b.1957, Czech): 2 Symphonies, Chamber Symphony No. 1.
Novák, Vitězslav (1870-1949, Czech): Autumn Symphony, May Symphony.
Nowakowski, Józef (1800-1865, Polish): 2 Symphonies.
Nowowiewski, Feliks (1877-1946, Polish): 5 Symphonies.
Osterc, Slavko (1895-1941, Slovene): Symphony "Ideals".
Palkovský, Oldřich (1907-1983, Czech): 6 Symphonies.
Pallandios, Menelaos (1914-1970, Greek): Symphony in B.
Pałłasz, Edward (b.1936, Polish): Symphony.
Panayotov, Milen (b.1945, Bulgarian): Symphony.
Pašćan-Kojanov, Svetolik (1892-1971, Serbian): Symphony in D.
Patachich, Iván (1922-1993, Hungarian): 2 Symphonies, Sinfonietta Savariensis.
Paunović, Milenko (1889-1924, Serbian): 2 Symphonies.
Pavlov, Filip (b.1949, Bulgarian): Sinfonietta.
Peçi, Aleksandër (b.1951, Albanian): 2 Symphonies.
Pelikán, Miroslav (1922-2006, Czech): Symphony.
Perkowski, Piotr (1901-1990, Polish): 2 Symphonies, Sinfonia Drammatica.
Perlea, Jonel (1900-1970, Romanian): Symphony in C, Sinfonia Concertante.
Petra Basacopol, Carmen (b.1926, Romanian): Symphony.
Petri , Norbert (1912-1978, Romanian): Symphony in D minor.
Petrov, Petar (b.1949, Bulgarian): 6 Symphonies.
Petrova, Mara (1921-1997, Bulgarian): Symphony “April 1876”.
Petrovics, Emil (b.1930, Hungarian): Symphony for Strings.
Pibernik, Zlatko (b.1926, Croatian): 2 Symphonies.
Pícha, František (1893-1964, Czech): Christmas Symphony for String Orchestra.
Piliński, Stanisław (1839-1905, Polish): Symphony in F minor.
Piňos, Alois (1925-2008, Czech): Symphony Apollo XI
Podéšť, Ludvík (1921-1968, Czech): Symphony.
Pokorný Petr (1932-2008, Czech): Lyrical Symphony.
Popov, Alexandr (b.1927, Bulgarian): Sinfonietta for Strings.
Popov, Todor (1921-2000, Bulgarian): Symphony, Children’s Sinfonietta for Strings.
Popovici, Timotei (1870-1950, Romanian): 3 Symphonies.
Porfetye, Andreas (b.1927, Romanian): 3 Symphonies.
Pospíšil, Juraj (1931-2007, Slovak): 7 Symphonies, Chamber Sinfonietta.
Poturlian, Artin (b.1927, Bulgarian): 2 Symphonies.
Radev, Ruslan (b.1957, Bulgarian): Symphony in 3 Parts.
Radić, Dušan (1929-2010, Serbian): Symphony, Sinfonietta.
Radnai, Miklós (1892-1935, Hungarian): Symphony of the Magyars.
Raţiu, Adrian (1928-2005, Romanian): 2 Symphonies.
Řehoř, Bohuslav (b.1938, Czech): 4 Symphonies.
Reiner, Karel (1910-1979, Czech): Symphony.
Remenkov, Stefan (1923-1988, Bulgarian): 3 Symphonies, Sinfonietta, Sinfonietta Concertante.
Rey, Cemal Reşit (1904-1985, Turkish): 3 Symphonies.
Ribári, Antal (b.1924, Hungarian): 3 Symphonies, Sinfonietta.
Riedlbauch, Václav (b.1947, Czech): 2 Symphonies.
Rogowski, Ludomir (1881-1954, Polish): 7 Symphonies.
Rojko, Uroš (b.1954, Slovene): Sinfonia Concertante.
Rudziński, Witold (1913-2004, Polish): : 2 Symphonies.
Rut, Josef (1926-2007, Czech): 4 Symphonies.
Rybář, Jaroslav (b.1942, Czech): Symphony.
Rytel, Piotr (1884-1970, Polish): 3 Symphonies.
Salva, Tadeáš (1937-1995, Slovak): 5 Symphonies, Sinfonietta for Strings.
Samaras, Christos (b.1956, Greek): Symphony No. 1, Symphonia Humana, Chamber Symphony.
Saudek, Vojtech (b.1951, Czech): Symphony, Sinfonietta.
Sedláček, Bohuslav (b.1928, Czech): Sinfonietta.
Shagunov, Georgi (1875-1948, Bulgarian): 6 Symphonies.
Shupo, Sokol (b.1954, Albanian): 2 Symphonies.
Šijanec, Marjan (b.1950, Slovene): Mirage Symphony.
Siklós, Albert (1878-1942, Hungarian): 3 Symphonies.
Sikora, Elżbieta (b.1943, Polish): Symphony No. 1.
Silyanovski, Triphon (1923-2005, Bulgarian): 3 Symphonies.
Šimandl, Karel (b.1963, Czech): 2 Symphonies.
Šimíček, Jan (b.1942, Czech): 2 Symphonies, Chamber Symphony.
Simon, Emil (b.1936, Romanian): Symphony in D.
Širola, Božidar (1889-1956, Croatian): Symphony in E minor, Sinfonia Concertante, Sinfonietta for Strings.
Šiša, Pero (1956, Croatian): 6 Symphonies.
Šivic, Pavel (1908-1995, Slovene): 3 Symphonies
Sixta, Jozef (1940-2007, Slovak): 2 Symphonies.
Slabakov, Yulian (b.1957, Bulgarian): Symphony.
Sławiński, Adam (b.1935, Polish): Symphony in C minor.
Sojar Voglar, Črt (b.1976, Slovene): 2 Symphonies, Sinfonia "'In Stile Classico', Sinfonietta for String Orchestra.
Soltys, Mieczysłav (1863-1929, Polish): 2 Symphonies.
Soltys, Adam (1890-1968, Polish): 2 Symphonies.
Spassov, Bojidar (b.1949, Bulgarian): Symphony.
Spassov, Ivan (1934-1996, Bulgarian): 4 Symphonies.
Srebotnjak, Alojz (b.1931, Slovene): Sinfonietta.
Šrom, Karel (1904-1981, Czech): 2 Symphonies.
Stanislav, Josef (1897-1971, Czech): Red Army Symphony.
Statkova, Silvia (b.1964, Bulgarian): Symphony.
Stefanov, Pavel (1899-1961, Bulgarian): Symphony.
Stibilj, Milan (b.1929, Slovene): Symphony.
Stojowski, Zygmunt (1869-1946, Polish): 2 Symphonies.
Stolpe, Antoni (1851-1872, Polish): Symphony in A minor.
Stoykov, Todor (1932-1993, Bulgarian): 3 Symphonies.
Strmić, Nikola (1839-1896 Croatian): Sinfonia Fantastica in E, Sinfonia in F.
Štuhec, Igor (b.1932, Slovene): 2 Symphonies, Symphony Eleutheria, Sinfonietta.
Suchý, František (1902-1977, Czech): 4 Symphonies.
Suda, Stanislav (1865-1931, Czech): Symphony "A Life at Dusk".
Sugár, Miklós (b.1952, Hungarian): Sinfonia.
Sunder, Kemal (b.1933, Turkish): 3 Symphonies.
Szałowski, Antoni (1907-1973, Polish): Symphony; Sinfonietta.
Székely, Endre (1912-1989 Hungarian): Symphony, Sinfonietta Concertante.
Szelényi, István (1904-1972, Hungarian): 3 Symphonies.
Szeluto, Apolinary (1884-1966, Polish): 28 Symphonies.
Szervánszky, Endre (1911-1977, Hungarian): Symphony.
Szokolay, Sándor (b.1931, Hungarian): 3 Symphonies, Sinfonia Romana, Hungarian Choral Symhony, Sinfonietta.
Tanev, Alexandar (1928-1996, Bulgarian): Sinfonietta.
Tarmakov, Russi (b.1949, Bulgarian): Symphony.
Trudić, Božiidar (1911-1989, Serbian): 2 Symphonies.
Tsenova, Julia (b.1948, Bulgarian): Sinfonia con Piano Concertante.
Tura, Yalçin (b.1934, Turkish): Symphony, 1956; Chamber Symphony.
Tüzün, Ferit (1929-1977, Turkish): Symphony.
Ukmar, Vilko (1905-1991, Slovene): 3 Symphonies.
Usmanbaş, İlhan (b.1921, Turkish ): 3 Symphonies.
Varkonyì, Béla (1878-1947, Hungarian): Symphony.
Vásárhelyi, Zoltán (1900-1977, Hungarian): Symphony.
Vécsey, Jenő (1909-1966, Hungarian): Symphony-Concerto.
Veit, Václav (1806-1864, Czech): Symphony in E minor.
Vincze, Imre (1926-1969, Hungarian): 3 Symphonies.
Vlad, Roman (b.1919, Romanian): Sinfonia all’antica, Sinfonietta.
Vlad, Ulpiu (b.1945, Romanian): 2 Symphonies, Sinfonia Brevis, Sinfonia Concertante
Vomáčka, Boleslav (1887-1965, Czech): Symphony in F.
Vorlová, Slavá (1894-1973, Czech): Symphony JM.
Vostřák, Zbyněk (1920-1985, Czech): Sinfonia.
Vučković, Vojislav (1910-1942, Serbian): 3 Symphonies.
Weinberger, Jaromír (1896-1967, Czech): Lincoln Symphony.
Weis, Karel (1862-1944, Czech): Symphony in C minor.
Wieniawski, Józef (1837-1912, Polish): Symphony in D.
Wiłkomirski, Kazimierz (1900-1995, Polish): Sinfonia Concertante.
Winkler, Adalbert (b.1930, Romanian): 2 Symphonies.
Wiszniewski, Zbigniew (1922-1999, Polish): Sinfonia da Camera.
Zadeja, Çesk (1927-1997, Albanian): Symphony No. 1.
Zaimov, Velislav (b.1951, Bulgarian): 14 Symphonies.
Zajc, Ivan (1832-1914, Croatian): 2 Symphonies.
Źeleński, Władysław (1837-1921, Polish): 2 Symphonies.
Zielińska, Lidia (b.1953, Poland): Little Atrophic Symphony .
Zirra, Alexandru (1883-1946, Romanian): 3 Symphonies.
Živković, Mirjana (b.1936, Serbian): Sinfonia Polifonica.
Zografski, Tomislav (1934-2000, Macedonian): Symphonia Concertante, Sinfonietta.
Zoras, Leonidas (1905-1987, Greek): 2 Symphonies.
Zonić, Edin Dino (b.1966, Bosnian): Symphony.
Zorzor, Stefan (b.1932, Romanian): Aarhus Symphony.


 

* * * * * * * * * *



SOURCES OF INFORMATION

(1) BOOKS

Clough, Francis F. and C.J. Cuming. The World's Encyclopedia
of Recorded Music
(including Supplements) in 3 vols. London:
Sidgwick and Jackson, 1952-57.

Contemporary Czechoslovak Composers (edited by Čeněk Gardavský). Prague and Bratislav: Panton, 1965.

Viorel Cosma. Muzicieni din Romănia: Lexicon Bibliografic, Volume I. Bucharest: Editura Muzicală, 1989.

The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, 2d ed., in 29
vols., edited by Stanley Sadie and John Tyrrell. New York:
Grove, 2000.

Layton, Robert (ed.). A Guide to the Symphony. Oxford: Oxford
University Press, 1995.

Simpson, Robert. The Symphony, 2 vols. New York: Drake
Publishers, 1972.

Slonimsky, Nicolas. Baker's Biographical Dictionary of
Musicians
, 8th edition. New York: Schirmer Books, 1992.

Slonimsky, Nicolas. Baker's Biographical Dictionary of 20th
Century Classical Musicians
(edited by Laura Kuhn). New York:
Schirmer Books, 1997.

Thompson, Oscar (ed). The International Cyclopedia of Music
and Musicians
, updated 11th edition. New York: Dodd, Mead and
Co., 1985.

 

(2) CATALOGS

ASCAP Symphonic Catalog. 3rd ed. (1977)

Gramophone Classical Record Catalogue (retitled: Gramophone
Classical Catalogue) (1953-1996)

Schwann Long Playing Record Catalog (retitled: Schwann 1 –
Record and Tape Guide and Schwann Opus) (1949-2001)

Supraphon Long Playing Records Catalogue 1960

Supraphon Catalogue 1976

 

(3) WEBSITES

LIBRARY CATALOGUES AND NATIONAL COMPOSER INFORMATION SITES

British Library Sound Archive http://www.bl.uk/collections/sound-archive/nsa.html

Budapest Music Center http://database.bmc.hu

Library and Archives Canada http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/lac-bac/search-recherche/all-tout.php?Language=eng

Library of Congress http://catalog.loc.gov/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?DB=local&PAGE=First

Music Centre Slovakia http://www.hc.sk/src/odi_zoznam_skladatelov.php?lg=en

Musica.cz (Czech Composers) http://www.musica.cz/composers.html

New York Public Library Research Catalog http://catnyp.nypl.org/

Polish Culture http://www.culture.pl/en/culture/

Polish Music Center http://www.usc.edu/dept/polish_music/composer/composer.html

SIGIC (Slovene Composers) http://www.sigic.si/index.php?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=98

Union of Bulgarian Composers http://www.ubc-bg.com/en

 

OTHER SITES

Amazon (UK) http://www.amazon.co.uk

Amazon (USA) http://www.amazon.com

Arcodiva Catalog (Czech Composers) http://www.musicweb-international.com/arcodiva/ARCO_DIVA_catalogue.htm

Arkiv Music http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/main.jsp

Ars Antiqua/Mikrokosmos http://www.mikrokosmos.com/

BIS Records http://www.bis.se/index.php

Canfield's Classical Reference classicalreference.com/

Chandos Records http://www.chandos.net

Crotchet http://www.crotchet.co.uk

Dutton Vocalion Records http://www.duttonvocalion.com

EMI/Virgin Classics http://www.emiclassics.com

Gramophone Archive http://www.gramophone.net

Hyperion Records http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk

MDT Records http://www.mdt.co.uk/MDTSite/pages/home/default.asp

MusicWeb International http://www.musicweb-international.com

MuziekWeb (Centrale Discotheek Rotterdam) http://www.muziekweb.nl/menu/shared/cat/pica/index.php

Naxos Records http://www.naxos.com

Parnassus Classical LP Vinyl Records and CDs http://www.parnassusrecords.com/old_site/oldcatalogs.htm

 

COMPOSER AND CONDUCTOR SITES

Many contemporary composers have their own websites and others can be found on the websites of their publishers. There are also websites for earlier composers and conductors that are maintained by societies that promote their music and recordings. These can be found by typing the composer's name into any search engine.

 

© 2014 MICHAEL HERMAN

 

 



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